April 29, 2015

Diabetes Types & IR ~ IMPORTANT!

Posted in AGING, ASPARTAME, DIABETES, FYI BITS - LIFESTYLE CHANGES, LIFESTYLE CHANGES tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 6:06 pm by PCOSLady

IMPORTANT !!!!
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For IR (Insulin Resistant) & Diabetic Types
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FACT: There is no long term research showing the Diabetes Association’s way as being healthy…
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IR & Diabetics: Start to EAT
~ Low Carb…
~ All the good fats you want…
~ All the proteins you want…
~ All the non-starchy veggies you want…
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You will realize you have;
~ No sugar spikes ever after a meal!
~ In months you will lose weight…
~ Get healthier by the month…
~ Be off medications in 4- 6 months…
~*Your body will be getting healthier inside!
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Thank Dr Schwartzbien MD who helped Suzanne Somers with her book Get Skinny on Fabulous Food…
~ There is no long term research showing the Diabetes way as being healthy…
~ The new way you prove the old way wrong after the first meal!
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Best wishes in getting healthy in a few months!
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You see progress day by day…
~
Christie
PCOS Lady
http://PCOSLady.wordpress.com/
pcoslady@mail.com
~
Sites to look at:
~
Dr Berg’s Body Type Quiz
~ Learn which hormone is driving YOU!
~    http://www.drberg.com/body-type-quiz
~
Now Loss
~ How to to look good naked… By Adrian Bryant
~   http://www.nowloss.com/
~
Aspartame Poison by way of side effects
~   https://pcoslady.wordpress.com/2012/04/02/aspartame-side-effects/
~
Misdiagnosed
~   https://pcoslady.wordpress.com/2012/08/28/top-100-misdiagnosed-diseases/
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Sugar Names
~   https://pcoslady.wordpress.com/2014/07/25/sugar-names/
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Lifestyle Changes
~    https://pcoslady.wordpress.com/category/lifestyle-changes/
~
Parasitology Center Inc: Parasitologist in Scottsdale, AZ Dr.Omar Amin
~   
www.parasitetesting.com
~    ALL 250,000 types of bad parasites are tested here!
(50,000 types are yeast!)
~
Canidida MD ~ Yeast is with symptoms

~    http://www.candidamd.com/candida/symptoms.html

~
Be in the know!
All your symptoms count!
IT’s YOUR BODY ~ YOUR LIFE!

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April 19, 2015

30 Sugar Subs for Any Possible Situation

Posted in GOOD EATS ~ SITES/RECIPES, LIFESTYLE CHANGES tagged , , , , , , , , , , , at 6:33 pm by PCOSLady

http://greatist.com/health/30-sugar-substitutes-any-and-every-possible-situation
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30 Sugar Substitutes for Any and Every Possible Situation
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The dreaded sweet tooth strikes again. Most of us know sugar isn’t the healthiest food item, but the risks go way beyond a sugar crash or a cavity . And artificial sweeteners can sometimes add even more calories to a meal. Instead of going cold (and sugarless) turkey, try some of these healthier sugar substitutions:
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1. Agave Nectar
History lesson time: The Aztecs used agave thousands of years ago and praised this syrup as a gift from gods. A derivative of the same plant as tequila (cheers!), this golden sweetener tastes similar to honey and is perfect in hot or iced tea. But be sure to use in moderation—agave’s high fructose content can sometimes cross it in to the dangerfood zone!
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2. Maple Syrup
The benefits of maple syrup are aplenty: It comes directly from a plant’s sap and contains over 50 antioxidants. Make sure to grab the real stuff (sorry, Aunt Jemima) and spread it over waffles or use it in homemade granola.
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3. Lemon
Fans of gin can skip the extra sugar in a Tom Collins and add an extra lemon squeeze—we promise no one will notice.
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4. Honey
Thanks to bees, this scrumptious stuff packs an antioxidant punch. Enjoy some in hot tea to help soothe a scratchy throat, or get creative and add a spoonful to homemade salad dressing.
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5. Applesauce
Instead of a half-cup white sugar in a batch of oatmeal cookies, swap in an equal amount of applesauce! The natural sweetness from a Golden Delicious or Fuji apple is perfect in an after-dinner treat. Purchase the no sugar-added kind, or make some at home.
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6. Erythritol
This sugar alcohol is practically a guilt-free sweet solution. (And the FDA says it’s safe!) At 0.2 calories per gram, the white powder from a plant occurs naturally in many fruits. Plus, it doesn’t lead to tooth decay and other not-so-sweet effects of sugar consumption. It’s not quite as sweet as natural sugar, so try it in chocolate baked goods like brownies.
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7. Raisins
For a creative spin on things, blend a cup of raisins in a food processer. With antioxidants and fiber, these little dried grapes add a kick to any baked good.
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8. Cinnamon
Spice up a morning cup of coffee with cinnamon. This super spice adds subtle sweetness while boosting immunity, no calories included.
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9. Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
For a warm winter treat, mix some unsweetened cocoa powder in a glass of hot water or skim milk. It’ll satisfy that sweet tooth without all the extra sugar the sweetened version includes. Add a splash of vanilla extract for extra flavor!
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10. Reb A
Hailing from South America, this natural extract comes from the stevia plant and is recognized by the FDA as safe. It only takes a drop or two to sweeten a bowl of oatmeal.
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11. Cranberries
Skip the cup of sugar and add cranberries to a batch of muffins or scones. These little tart treats add a dose of antioxidants refined sugar can’t offer.
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12. Processed Dates
Grab a bunch of dates for an extra boost of antioxidants in the next baking experiment . With a low glycemic index and some subtle sweetness, it may be perfect for brownie batter or the base of homemade granola bars . Substitute two-thirds cup for one cup of regular sugar.
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13. Grapefruit
For a daily dose of vitamin C, opt for grapefruit juice in a cocktail over soda or tonic water. It’ll add a sweet and sour kick to any beverage.
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14. Coconut Sugar
Get a little tropical and use coconut sugar in a fruit smoothie. Made from the sap of coconut flowers, this natural sugar comes in block, paste, or granulated form. Plus, it’s loaded with potassium, which helps keep our bones strong.
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15. Brown Rice Syrup
Brown rice syrup comes from (you guessed it!) brown rice. More nutritious than its high-fructose alternative, this buttery and nutty flavored syrup is perfect in granola bars and baked breads.
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16. Rapadura
This sweet treat’s made from sugar cane but skips the refining stage, so it retains vitamins and minerals lost when white sugar is processed. Keep the one-to-one ratio when swapping rapadura for sugar in baked goods.
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17. Lime
Make juice boxes a thing of the past and spice up a glass of sparkling water with a squeeze of lime. The tart and tang will keep taste buds satisfied without the extra sugar rush.
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18. Puréed Banana
In the next loaf of banana bread, try using extra-ripe bananas and eliminating the sugar. The fruit naturally becomes sweeter as it ripens, so there’s no need for extra sugar .
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19. Milk
The natural sugar in milk adds a touch of sweetness to that morning cup of Joe, so think twice before adding a teaspoon or two of sugar. The lactose in milk may do the trick.
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20. Frozen Juice Concentrate
Use apple juice concentrate in homemade apple pie. With additional fiber and antioxidants, the pie will be a sweet solution for a nutritious dessert!
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21. Barley Malt Extract
Derived from barley, this protein-packed syrup is perfect in a pecan or pumpkin pie. The dark syrup’s similar to molasses and will enhance the flavor of any baked treat.
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22. Sucanat
Introducing sugar in its most natural state! Sucanat is a sneaky acronym that stands for SUgar CAne NATural. This sweetener is made from organic cane sugar and packs in some nutrients white sugar lacks.
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23. Apricot Puree
Apricots are a nutritional A+ with vitamin C, fiber, and iron. Make some of the sweet stuff right at home and mix it in plain Greek yogurt or enjoy it with hearty whole-grain bread.
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24. Fresh-Squeezed Orange Juice
In a batch of homemade bread, swap out the sugar for fresh orange juice. Looking for a cool treat? Freeze some juice in an ice-pop mold rather than buying what’s in the freezer section.
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25. Club Soda
Health up that next large glass of fruit juice with some club soda—even a simple three-to-one juice to club soda ratio saves some major sugar calories.
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26. Rum
Alcohol ain’t just for drinking—caramelize a few slices of pineapple in rum and add them to pancakes or unsweetened yogurt. Now that’s a fancy way to stay sweet!
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27. Tea Leaves
Fruity or earthy leaves like pomegranate and green tea are naturally sugar-free and add an extra nutritional kick to any beverage. Use them in liquor for a surprising healthy twist.
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28. Molasses
What happens when sugar cane, grapes, and beets get together? Molasses! Use this dark syrup in a recipe for gingerbread cookies. It’ll add some extra iron and calcium, which makes the cookies healthy, right?
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29. Balsamic Glaze
Ditch the Funfetti frosting and add a generous drizzle of balsamic glaze to angel food cake. Simply simmer balsamic vinegar until it forms a thick syrup.
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30. Yacón Syrup
A sweetening agent extracted from the yacón plant, this molasses-y syrup has hints of apple and just half the calories of cane sugar. It’s sweet just like honey, so a little goes a long way in baked goods and raw fruit smoothies.

 

October 27, 2014

250 lb vs 120 lb Women

Posted in LIFESTYLE CHANGES tagged , , , , , , , , at 9:04 pm by PCOSLady

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-1269074/Crushed-lungs-strained-joints-swollen-heart–extraordinary-scans-reveal-fat-does-you.html

Fat vs Thin

Is this you on the left? Know why you must lose weight to live!

Body scan of a 250lbs woman on the left and a 120 lb woman on the right.
Picture: Spot the difference: The obese woman on the left has fat around her organs (shown by the yellow areas) and an enlarged heart which can have dire consequences on her health

Crushed lungs, strained joints and a swollen heart – the extraordinary scans that reveal what being fat does to you
By Victoria Lambert
Updated: 04:14 EST, 27 April 2010

Carrying extra pounds may not look attractive from the outside, but it’s been difficult to understand precisely the havoc it wreaks on your insides – until now.

Here, in a pair of astonishing pictures, we can see exactly what being overweight does to the organs, bones and muscles. These images of two women were taken by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRIRI) scanner and reveal in horrifying detail the obesity effect.

The woman on the left weighs just over 17 ½st, the one on the right just under 8 ½st. Their muscles (shown in red), bones (white), organs (black) and fat (yellow) are all clearly defined.

As well as the fat sitting just under the skin (the fat you can pinch), these images reveal the fat inside the body wrapped around the organs.

To explain the impact of those extra pounds, we talked to Professor Jimmy Bell from Imperial College, London (the man who developed MRIRI to show body fat), and orthopaedic surgeon Mike Hayton and consultant radiologist Waqar Bhatti, both of Alexandra Hospital, Cheadle, Manchester.

Their comments make for alarming reading – for men as well as women. But the good news, says Professor Bell, is that you can change this picture through diet and exercise. These images provide a compelling incentive.

NECK: HEADACHES/SNORING
‘Fat is deposited everywhere – even around your head and neck, especially at the back,’ says orthopaedic surgeon Mr Hayton.
‘Excess fat here would cause pressure on the nerves and may contribute to headaches and neck pains.’

An American study of more than 143,000 people found that chronic daily headaches are more common among the obese.

‘The yellow patches on either side of the neck of the woman on the left also quite clearly show that a thick layer of subcutaneous fat is building up,’ says consultant radiologist Dr Bhatti. ‘This will compress the airways and lead to snoring.’

Obesity is one of the most common risk factors for sleep apnoea, a condition that occurs when tissues in the upper airways come too close to each other, temporarily blocking breathing.

It can lead to memory difficulties, low energy, shortness of breath, leg swelling and high blood pressure. Long term, it can contribute to stroke, hypertension and even sudden-death syndrome.

LUNGS: BREATHLESSNESS
Although both women appear to have similar-sized lungs, the larger one’s weight will be making breathing much more difficult for her.

That’s because ‘any fat in the abdomen will push up into the lungs when the person lies flat’, says Dr Bhatti. ‘This will cause breathlessness even when lying down.’

The more difficult breathing becomes, the harder it is to get enough oxygen circulating in the bloodstream. This can lead to lack of energy, impaired immune system and even high blood pressure, as the body tries to compensate.

This is because lungs are not solid structures and can be compressed.

‘Fat doesn’t bulge inwards, it bulges outwards,’ explains Professor Bell. ‘That’s why we all end up with bellies.’

HIPS: ARTHRITIS/VARICOSE VEINS
‘Being obese means the hip joints have to carry a lot of extra weight, so they wear out sooner, causing arthritis where there is susceptibility,’ says Mr Hayton.

Obese patients who need hip replacements will find the operation more physically stressful.

Moreover, surgeons may be less happy to operate. One American study found obese people have a significantly higher risk of post-operative complications, such as heart attack, wound infection and urinary tract infections.

The same study found that morbidly obese patients (those more than 100lb over their ideal weight) were nearly twice as likely to die as a result.

Poor posture and unhealthy gait are more common in obese people, further predisposing joints to osteoarthritis, says Arthritis Research UK.

The larger woman shown here is apple-shaped, meaning she’s carrying fat around the organs. However even if you’re the supposedly ‘healthier’ pear-shaped, excess weight still puts you at high risk of osteoarthritis and varicose veins, warns Mr Hayton.
Varicose veins occur because the fat makes it more difficult for blood to pump back up the body and, as a result, blood valves may be damaged.

HEART: CARDIAC DISEASE
‘Excess fat is more worrying when it’s found around the organs, where it’s known as visceral fat. This can be toxic and poison you from within,’ says Professor Bell.

Visceral fat is not an inert lump of lard, but actually pumps out chemicals and has been linked to heart disease, diabetes and some forms of cancer.

Professor Jimmy Bell also points out that in the larger woman’s scan, her heart (which looks like a large red and black teardrop, suspended between the lungs) has clearly enlarged, the muscle increasing in response to the added strain her weight is placing on her body.

An enlarged heart will not be able to pump effectively, and at the very least will lead to shortness of breath and fatigue.

An enlarged heart is a common cause of heart failure, when it cannot supply sufficient blood flow to meet the body’s needs. At least four per cent of deaths in the UK every year are due to heart failure, according to the British Heart Foundation.

The yellow rim of fat around the heart, called pericardial fat, is also linked to hardening of the arteries.

Pericardial fat secretes high levels of inflammatory proteins called cytokines. Constant exposure of the heart to these proteins can lead to inflammation of the coronary arteries and calcified plaque (the main cause of heart disease).

An American study published in 2008 found that people with the highest levels of pericardial fat were found to be five times more likely also to have high levels of calcified coronary plaque.

FEET: SORE HEELS
‘Carrying at least twice the weight they are meant to means feet will get very sore,’ warns Mr Hayton. The Harvard Medical School has found that being overweight places pressure on the plantar fascia – the ligament-like structure that runs from your heel to the ball of your foot, which ‘may become inflamed, causing a sharp pain at the heel when walking’.

KNEES: ARTHRITIS
Obesity is the single biggest cause of osteoarthritis in weight-bearing joints such as knees and ankles, and an obese person is 14 times more likely to develop knee arthritis, says Arthritis UK.

This is because the additional pressure wears away cartilage – the natural layer of shock absorber in our joints – leaving bone to grind against bone. Dr Ian Drysdale, of the British College of Osteopathic Medicine, explains the scale: ‘For every pound you are overweight, the momentum of running or jumping increases the pressure on the joint by up to ten times.’

Ankle joints will come under pressure, too. However, ankle replacement is a fairly rare procedure. ‘Developing a thick layer of fat around the upper arm will put an increased load on the shoulder joint,’ says surgeon Mike Hayton.

‘As the fat builds up, it will become more difficult to lift your arm above your head – or even put your jacket on. You’ll feel less flexible.’

Then as you stop using the joint fully, the soft tissues will start to contract, dragging the ball and socket closer, causing bones to rub and leading to arthritis and pain.

GUTS: DEPRESSION/INFERTILITY
The scan of the larger woman reveals not just the rolls of fat on her body, but large amounts of fat wrapped around her organs (the black patches) in her abdomen.

The thinner woman on the right not only has little ‘ surface’ body fat, but her organs have minimal visceral fat.

‘The abdomen is the worst place for fat to accumulate,’ says Professor Bell. ‘Many people assume middle-aged spread is normal, but it’s not. You should accept that as you age you will be less active and need fewer calories,’ adds Mr Hayton.

This visceral fat constantly secretes chemicals and hormones in large quantities such as leptin and restitin, which are associated with changes in the metabolism and linked to the onset of Type 2 diabetes.

These hormones can also disrupt the entire endocrine system and lead to other hormone imbalances, such as polycystic ovary syndrome, a condition which affects women, causing excess hair, weight gain and infertility.

Meanwhile, when fat reaches the digestive system it breaks down in the liver. As it does this, toxins are released into the bloodstream.

These can seriously damage organs such as the liver, causing fatty liver disease. This can lead to inflammation, the formation of scar tissue and eventually cirrhosis. It is also a risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

There is a mind-body connection too. Research suggests that visceral fat affects mood by increasing production of the stress hormone cortisol and reducing levels of feelgood endorphins. Visceral fat is also known to cause inflammation in the arteries and around the colon.

In men, being overweight increases the risk of colon cancer by an estimated 25 per cent; being obese increases it by 50 per cent (the link is nowhere near as clear in women), according to Cancer Research UK.

Extra weight will also put pressure on the pelvic floor and may cause incontinence and haemorrhoids.

July 25, 2014

Sugar Names

Posted in CANCER, DIABETES, LIFESTYLE CHANGES tagged , , , , at 5:21 pm by PCOSLady

PCOS Lady:
Felt you should see this list… It grows and may have a few go to the right side of eating…
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Please see: https://www.facebook.com/notes/single-mans-kitchen/all-the-249-names-of-sugar-so-far-project/10150839799498198
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All the 310 names of sugar so far project.
by Single Man’s Kitchen on Friday, May 18, 2012
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This is the list of the ingredient names for sugars that you find on packages in the USA and Canada. Some of the sugars are really artificial sweeteners, but have a high calorific value, high enough to be considered an artificial sugar.
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Agave nectar (Often with HFCS)
Agave syrup (Often with HFCS
All natural evaporated cane juice
Amasake
Amber liquid sugar
Anhydrous dextrose
Apple butter (Usually with HFCS)
Apple fructose
Apple sugar
Apple syrup
Arenga sugar
Azucar morena
Bakers special sugar
Barbados Sugar
Barley malt
Barley malt syrup
Bar sugar
Berry Sugar
Beet molasses
Beet sugar
Beet sugar molasses
Beet syrup
Birch syrup
Blackstrap molasses
Blonde coconut sugar
Brown rice syrup
Brown rice malt
Brown sugar
BRS
Buttered syrup
Candy floss
Candy syrup
Candi syrup
Cane crystals
Cane juice
Cane juice crystals
Cane juice powder
Cane sugar
Caramel
Carob syrup
Caster sugar
Castorsugar
Cellobiose
Chicory (HFCS)
Coarse sugar
Coconut crystals
Coconut nectar
Coconut palm sugar
Coconut sap sugar
Coconut sugar
Coconut syrup
Coco sugar
Coco sap sugar
Concentrate juice (Often with HFCS)
Concord grape juice concentrate (Often with HFCS)
Confectioner’s sugar
Corn sugar (HFCS)
Corn syrup (may contain some HFCS)
Corn syrup powder (may contain some HFCS)
Corn syrup solids (may contain some HFCS)
Corn sweetener (HFCS)
Cornsweet 90 ® (really HFCS 90)
Creamed honey (Often with HFCS)
Crystal dextrose
Crystalline fructose
Crystallized organic cane juice
Crystal sugar
D-arabino-hexulose
Dark brown sugar
Dark molasses
Date sap
Date sugar
Decorating sugar
Dehydrated sugar cane juice
Demerara sugar
Demerara light sugar
Dextrin
Dextran
Dextrose
D-fructose
D-fructofuranose
D-glucose
Diastatic malt
Diatase
Disaccharide
Dixie crystals
D-mannose
Dried corn syrup
Dried evaporated organic cane juice
D-xylose
ECJ
Evaporated cane juice
Evaporated organic cane juice
Evaporated corn sweetener (HFCS)
Ethyl maltol
First molasses
Florida Crystals
Free Flowing
Free flowing brown sugar
Fructamyl
Fructosan (may contain HFCS)
Fructose (HFCS)
Fructose crystals (HFCS)
Fructose sweetener (HFCS)
Fruit fructose (HFCS)
Fruit juice (Often with HFCS)
Fruit juice concentrate (Often with HFCS)
Fruit juice nectar (Often with HFCS)
Fruit sugar (Often with HFCS)
Fruit syrup (Often with HFCS)
Galactose
Glucodry
Glucomalt
Glucoplus
Glucose
Glucose-fructose syrup (HFCS)
Glucose solids
Glucose syrup
Glucosweet
Gluctose fructose (HFCS)
Golden molasses
Golden sugar
Golden syrup (GMO beet)
Gomme syrup
Granulated coconut nectar
Granulated coconut sugar
Granulated fructose
Granulated sugar
Granulated sugar cane juice
Granulized cane sugar
Grape sugar
Grape juice concentrate (Often with HFCS)
Gur
HFCS
HFCS 42
HFCS 55
HFCS 90
High dextrose glucose syrup
High-fructose corn syrup (*is the HFCS here)
High fructose maize syrup (HFCS)
High maltose corn syrup (Often with HFCS)
Hydrogenated starch
Hydrogenated starch hydrosylate
Hydrolyzed corn starch (Often with HFCS)
Honey
Honey comb
Honey powder
HSH
Icing sugar
Inulin (HFCS)
Invert sugar
Inverted sugar
Inverted sugar syrup
Invert syrup
Icing sugar
Isoglucose (HFCS)
Isomalt
Isomaltotriose
Isosweet
Jaggery
Jaggery powder
Lactitol
Lactose
Levulose
Lesys
Light brown sugar
Light molasses
Liquid dextrose
Liquid fructose (Often with HFCS)
Liquid fructose syrup (Often with HFCS)
Liquid honey (Often with HFCS)
Liquid maltodextrin
Liquid sucrose
Liquid sugar
Maize sugar
Maize syrup (HFCS)
Maldex
Maldexel
Malt
Malted barley syrup HFCS)
Malted corn syrup (HFCS)
Malted corn and barley syrup (HFCS
Malted barley
Maltitol
Maltitol syrup
Malitsorb
Maltisweet
Maltodextrin
Maltose
Maltotetraitol
Maltotriitol
Maltotriose
Maltotriulose
Malt syrup
Mannitol
Maple Sugar
Maple syrup (Sometimes with HFCS)
Meritose
Meritab 700
Milk sugar
Misri
Mizuame
Molasses
Molasses sugar
Monosaccharide
Morena
Muscovado sugar
Mycose
Mylose
Nigerotriose
Nipa sap
Nipa syrup
Oligosaccharide
Organic Agave
Organic agave syrup
Organic brown rice syrup
Organic cane juice crystals
Organic coconut crystals
Organic coconut nectar
Organic coconut sugar
Organic coconut palm sugar
Organic granulated coconut sugar
Organic maple syrup
Organic palm sugar
Organic rice syrup
Organic sucanat
Organic sugar
Organic raw sugar
Orgeat syrup
Palm sap
Palm sugar
Palm syrup
Panela
Pancake syrup (Often with HFCS)
Panocha
Pearl sugar
Piloncillo
Potato maltodextrine
Potato syrup
Powdered sugar
Promitor
Pure fructose crystals (HFCS)
Pure cane syrup
Pure sugar spun
Raisin syrup
Rapadura
Raw agave syrup
Raw sugar
Raffinose
Refiner’s syrup (Often with HFCS)
Rice bran syrup
Rice malt
Rice maltodextrine
Rice malt syrup
Rice syrup
Rice syrup solids
Raw honey
Rock sugar
Saccharose
Sanding sugar
Second molasses
Shakar
Simple syrup (Often with HFCS)
Sirodex
Soluble corn fiber
Sorbitol
Sorbitol syrup
Sorghum
Sorghum molasses
Sorghum syrup
Sucanat
Sucre de canne naturel
Sucrose
Sucrosweet
Sugar
Sugar beet syrup
Sugar beet crystals
Sugar beet molasses
Sugar cane juice
Sugar cane natural
Sugar glass
Sugar hat
Sugar pine
Sulfured molasses
Sweetened condensed milk (Often with HFCS)
Sweet sorghum syrup
Syrup Syrup
Table sugar
Taffy
Tagatose
Tapioca syrup
Toddy
Treacle
Trehalose
Tremalose
Trimoline
Triose
Trisaccharides
Turbinado sugar
Unrefined sugar
Unsulphured molasses
Wheat syrup
White crystal sugar
White grape juice concentrate (Often with HFCS)
White refined sugar
White sugar
Wood sugar
Xylose
Yacon syrup
Yellow sugar

Copyright 2011, 2012 Jeremy Goodwin.

February 17, 2013

All Fruit Diet

Posted in CANCER, LIFESTYLE CHANGES tagged , , , , , , , , , , , at 7:32 pm by PCOSLady

ALL FRUIT DIET
~
Surprising Health Hazards Associated with All-Fruit Diet
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/02/11/all-fruit-diet.aspx?e_cid=20130217_SNL_MV_1&utm_source=snl&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20130217
~ Dr Mercola … Surprising Health Hazards Associated with All-Fruit Diet … February 11, 2013
~ Story at-a-glance
~
~ Ashton Kutcher recently disclosed he suffered pancreatic problems brought on by following an all-fruit diet adopted in preparation to play the character of Steve Jobs in the upcoming film “Jobs.” Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011
~ Fruits are loaded with antioxidants, vitamins and minerals, which is why eating a small amount of them is fine for healthy people. However, many benefit by restricting their fruit intake due to its high fructose content
~ Research suggests fructose may have a particularly significant impact on pancreatic cancer, as pancreatic cancer cells have been shown to use fructose for cell division, speeding up the growth and spread of the cancer
~ As a general guideline, I recommend limiting your total fructose consumption to 25 grams of fructose per day. If you suffer with any fructose-related health issues, such as insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, heart disease, obesity or cancer, you would be wise to limit your total fructose consumption to 15 grams of fructose per day. This includes fructose from ALL sources, including whole fruit…
~

February 7, 2013

Metabolism Plateau

Posted in LIFESTYLE CHANGES tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 5:41 pm by PCOSLady

PCOS Lady:
Many of us will hit a plateau, stuck in losing, a block, etc… You just have to try different things to get over it and keep losing weight…
~
Issues and factors do play a roll in this for some people…
~ Aging is a natural thing and can pack on pounds making you think you did something wrong or hit a plateau…
~ Drugs for high blood pressure, especially diuretics and the drugs known as beta-blockers, can make your body extremely resistant to weight loss… Cholesterol-lowering statin drugs also keep you from losing weight and they’re potentially dangerous as well… Dr. Atkins, “The majority of oral medications for diabetes have a weight-gain effect. The one drug that does help diabetics control their blood sugar and lose weight is metformin, marketed under the brand name Glucophage®.
~
http://www.low-carb.com/at-art5.html
~ Low-Carb … Informative on breaking your plateau…
~
Jacqueline Eberstein, R.N., director of medical education at The Atkins Center, figure out if you really are on a plateau. “The scale is the least reliable reflection of fat loss, ” she points out. “Look at other markers. Are you feeling better? Do your clothes feel loser? If you’re losing inches but not pounds, your fat cells are still shrinking. Also, check whether you are in still in lipolysis/ketosis by using ketone test strips. You’re only on a plateau it there’s no change at all for more than four weeks.”
~
http://www.low-carb.com/ketonestrips.html
~ Ketone Test Strips
~
Dr Oz
Overcome Your Metabolism Slump
~ Lose 20lbs in 4 weeks
Overcome Your Metabolism Slump
http://www.doctoroz.com/episode/overcome-your-metabolism-slump#cmpid=em020713
~ Dr Oz … Overcome Your Metabolism Slump – video peek … Lose 20lbs in 4 weeks … Aired 2/7/13 & 2/7/13 … A top nutritionist reveals the real reason why you’re not losing weight – and it’s not your fault! Get the three-phase plan to boost your metabolism and jump start your weight loss!
~
Dr Haylie Pomroy ~ https://www.facebook.com/hayliepomroy … Book: “The fast Metabolism Diet”
~ http://www.fastmetabolismdiet.com/
~
Dr Frances Largeman Roth ~ https://www.facebook.com/frances.largemanroth
~ www.franceslargemanroth.com/
~
Overcome Your Metabolism Slump | The Dr. Oz Show
www.doctoroz.com/episode/overcome-your-metabolism-slump
~ Dr Oz … Show episode …
~
http://www.tv.com/shows/the-dr-oz-show/episodes/
– Jumpstart Your Body – Metabolism one…
~
GOOGLE:
Dr Haylie Pomroy
Dr Frances Largeman Roth
fast metabolism diet
the fast metabolism diet
diet plateau
metabolism plateau
diet plateau meds
weight loss plateau
weight loss plateau tips

September 12, 2012

Food Labels to Stickers

Posted in LIFESTYLE CHANGES tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 7:20 pm by PCOSLady

FOOD LABELS to STICKERS
~
PCOS Lady:
Today we are forced to read and understand food labels and stickers if we want to eat healthy… I will be posting the links and pics to help you…
Some can be overwhelming! They say if the 1st 4 ingredients are normal things you are OK eating it… If it starts with enriched and hydrogenated
you better think twice on eating it! I say eat the bad here and there, not in your daily diet…
~
You can google for label and sticker charts as well…
~
FRUIT STICKERS
~
http://muffintop-less.tumblr.com/post/20093439659/this-is-very-helpful-the-stickers-on-fruit
~
This is very helpful!
~
The stickers on fruit actually tell you quite a bit about the produce you’re about to purchase:
~
~ 4 numbers mean they were conventionally grown,
~ 5 numbers starting with number 8 means they are genetically modified (GMO)
~ 5 numbers starting with 9 means they were organically grown (no pesticides or GMOs)
~
SITES
~
Nutrition Facts: An interactive guide to food labels – MayoClinic.com
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/nutrition-facts/NU00293
~ Mayo Clinic … Use this interactive guide to decipher the Nutrition Facts label and break the code on healthy eating…
~
9 Most Misleading Food Labels
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/04/20/9-most-misleading-food-la_n_538868.html#s81059&title=All_Natural
~ Huffington Post … by Travis Donovan – in 6,095 Google+ circles – More by Travis Donovan
Apr 20, 2010 – We believe in helping consumers make good choices about what they are eating, for themselves and the environment…
~
Choose My Plate
http://www.choosemyplate.gov/
~ US Department of Agriculture … Information, pictures, etc… on topics to help you eat right…
~
The 16 Most Misleading Food Labels
http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20599288,00.html
~ Health … Have you ever picked one grocery item over another because of the health claims on the label? You may have been duped.
~
FACT:
~ Fortified in cereal means they sprayed it on! I am serious, came from a factory employee at a cereal company…
~
GOOGLE:
food labels
food label images
fruit stickers
reading food labels
misleading food labels
~
~ work in progress ~

July 25, 2012

Triglyceride FAQS

Posted in FAQS, LIFESTYLE CHANGES tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 7:36 pm by PCOSLady

Monday, June 25, 2012
~
http://conditions.aolhealth.com/triglycerides/site-map
~
TRIGLYCERIDE ~ FAQs
~
1. What are triglycerides?
~
Triglycerides are a type of fat derived from the food we eat. Any calories we take in that aren’t used right away for energy are converted into triglycerides. Triglycerides move through the blood and are stored in fat cells. Our hormones regulate when triglycerides are released from fat cells to be used as energy between meals.
~
2. Why should I care about my triglyceride level?
~
A high blood triglyceride level–called hypertriglyceridemia–increases your risk for heart disease, heart attack, and stroke. It’s linked to an increased risk for diabetes. High triglycerides are also a risk factor for chronic pancreatitis–inflammation of the pancreas.
~
3. What causes high triglycerides?
~
Excess triglycerides occur most often due to inactivity and being overweight. But they can also be triggered by high alcohol consumption, diabetes, or an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism). Hypertriglyceridemia can also be a side effect of some medications, including birth control, corticosteroids, beta blockers, and others. High triglycerides also can stem from a genetic condition.
~
4. How do I know if I have high triglycerides?
~
A simple blood test, called a fasting lipid profile, measures cholesterol and triglycerides. If you’ve had your cholesterol tested and know your numbers, it’s likely your triglycerides were included. Doctors usually recommend men and women have the test at least every five years, beginning at age 20. People who have high triglycerides or are at risk for heart disease may need to have the test more often. Ask your doctor when you should be tested.
~
5. What does my triglyceride level mean?
~
Everyone has triglycerides in their body. And at normal levels, triglycerides are healthy. Talk to your doctor if your levels are above normal.
~
Below are the ranges for triglyceride levels:
Normal: Less than 150 mg/dL
Borderline-high: 150 to 199 mg/dL
High: 200 to 499 mg/dL
Very high: 500 mg/dL or higher
~
6. What lifestyle changes can I make to lower my triglycerides or keep them under control?
~
If you’re overweight, reduce your calorie intake to achieve a normal weight. Exercise at least 30 minutes each day. Eat a diet low in saturated and trans fats. Drink alcohol only in moderation–one drink a day for women and two for men at most. And try to reduce your carbohydrate intake to no more than 60 percent of total calories. A diet high in carbohydrates raises triglyceride levels.
~
7. Are there medications that can help?
~
Lifestyle changes are the primary treatment for hypertriglyceridemia. But there are medications that may help some people. If your doctor prescribes medicine for high triglyceride levels, it’s still very important to exercise and eat a healthy diet.
~
How Sugar Affects Triglycerides
~
From Every Day Health site – story is deleted
~
Triglycerides Health Center
~
High-Fructose Corn Syrup May Lead to High Triglycerides
~
Open your fridge or cupboard, and take a look at the labels on your food. Chances are you’ll see high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), a common form of added sugar. The U.S. food supply provides a whopping 53 pounds of HFCS per person each year. That adds up to a lot of empty calories. Now a new study from Princeton University suggests that it may also lead to higher triglycerides.
~
Is HFCS Bad News?
~
HFCS is made by processing corn syrup to create a blend of two simple sugars: fructose and glucose. The result is a cheap sweetener used in a wide array of sugary drinks and processed foods, such as regular sodas, energy drinks, sweetened fruit drinks, candies, desserts, canned fruits, jams, yogurt, condiments, soups, spaghetti sauce, crackers, cereals, and breads.
~
In the Princeton study, rats given HFCS gained more weight than those given sucrose (a.k.a. table sugar). This was true even when their calorie intake was the same. Over a period of months, rats fed HFCS also developed higher triglycerides and abnormal increases in abdominal fat. When such changes occur together in humans, they increase the risk for heart disease and type 2 diabetes.
~
The Effect on Triglycerides
~
Scientists are just starting to sort out how HFCS and triglycerides might be linked.
~
Fructose vs. Glucose
~
There has been little research done comparing the effects of HFCS with those of pure fructose or pure glucose. Pure fructose—found naturally in fruit—is broken down and used by the body differently from glucose.
~
Studies show that eating a lot of fructose may raise triglyceride levels after meals. If this eating pattern continues for weeks, it may lead to higher triglyceride levels at other times, too. The triglyceride-raising effect may be stronger in men and in women after menopause than in younger women. Compared to glucose, fructose also may decrease insulin sensitivity and increase belly fat—risk factors for heart disease and diabetes that often go hand-in-hand with elevated triglycerides.
~
HFCS vs. Sucrose
~
In real life, most sugar in the U.S. diet isn’t pure fructose or glucose. Instead, it’s HFCS or sucrose. The latter are both compounds made of fructose and glucose, but there are key differences between them. First, sucrose contains equal parts fructose and glucose. But HFCS contains unequal amounts and often is a bit heavier on the fructose side. Second, the fructose molecules in HFCS, unlike those in sucrose, are “free” and “unbound.” This means they’re easier for the body to use.
~
Theoretically, these differences could account for the different effects seen in rats fed HFCS or sucrose. Researchers think similar effects may occur in people as well. But more research in humans is needed before any firm conclusions can be drawn.
~
Short and Sweet Advice
~
What does this mean for you? To help manage not only your triglycerides but also your weight, it’s best to limit all added sugars. That’s any form of sugar put into a food or drink during processing, cooking, or serving. The American Heart Association says such sugars should add up to no more than 150 calories (about 9 teaspoons) per day for men or 100 calories (about 6 teaspoons) per day for women.
~
Reaching this goal isn’t easy; the average American currently gets more than two to three times that many calories per day from sugar. But every little bit helps. To get started, the next time you’re at the store, instead of buying sugary sodas, energy drinks, or fruit punches, choose sugar-free or low-calorie drinks instead.
~
Keep reading those food labels. If you see HFCS listed there, you might want to give your food or drink choice a second thought.
~
GOOGLE:
triglycerides
how sugar affects triglycerides

June 25, 2012

How Sugar Affects Triglycerides

Posted in LIFESTYLE CHANGES tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 5:51 pm by PCOSLady

PCOS Lady:
Do you have questions on triglycerides? I sure did like how do i lower them, what are they, etc…
~
http://conditions.aolhealth.com/triglycerides/site-map
~
Triglyceride FAQs
~
1. What are triglycerides?
Triglycerides are a type of fat derived from the food we eat. Any calories we take in that aren’t used right away for energy are converted into triglycerides. Triglycerides move through the blood and are stored in fat cells. Our hormones regulate when triglycerides are released from fat cells to be used as energy between meals.
~
2. Why should I care about my triglyceride level?
A high blood triglyceride level–called hypertriglyceridemia–increases your risk for heart disease, heart attack, and stroke. It’s linked to an increased risk for diabetes. High triglycerides are also a risk factor for chronic pancreatitis–inflammation of the pancreas.
~
3. What causes high triglycerides?
Excess triglycerides occur most often due to inactivity and being overweight. But they can also be triggered by high alcohol consumption, diabetes, or an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism). Hypertriglyceridemia can also be a side effect of some medications, including birth control, corticosteroids, beta blockers, and others. High triglycerides also can stem from a genetic condition.
~
4. How do I know if I have high triglycerides?
A simple blood test, called a fasting lipid profile, measures cholesterol and triglycerides. If you’ve had your cholesterol tested and know your numbers, it’s likely your triglycerides were included. Doctors usually recommend men and women have the test at least every five years, beginning at age 20. People who have high triglycerides or are at risk for heart disease may need to have the test more often. Ask your doctor when you should be tested.
~
5. What does my triglyceride level mean?
Everyone has triglycerides in their body. And at normal levels, triglycerides are healthy. Talk to your doctor if your levels are above normal.
~
Below are the ranges for triglyceride levels:
Normal: Less than 150 mg/dL
Borderline-high: 150 to 199 mg/dL
High: 200 to 499 mg/dL
Very high: 500 mg/dL or higher
~
6. What lifestyle changes can I make to lower my triglycerides or keep them under control?
If you’re overweight, reduce your calorie intake to achieve a normal weight. Exercise at least 30 minutes each day. Eat a diet low in saturated and trans fats. Drink alcohol only in moderation–one drink a day for women and two for men at most. And try to reduce your carbohydrate intake to no more than 60 percent of total calories. A diet high in carbohydrates raises triglyceride levels.
~
7. Are there medications that can help?
Lifestyle changes are the primary treatment for hypertriglyceridemia. But there are medications that may help some people. If your doctor prescribes medicine for high triglyceride levels, it’s still very important to exercise and eat a healthy diet.
~
How Sugar Affects Triglycerides
~
From Every Day Health site – story is deleted
Triglycerides Health Center
~
High-Fructose Corn Syrup May Lead to High Triglycerides
~
Open your fridge or cupboard, and take a look at the labels on your food. Chances are you’ll see high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), a common form of added sugar. The U.S. food supply provides a whopping 53 pounds of HFCS per person each year. That adds up to a lot of empty calories. Now a new study from Princeton University suggests that it may also lead to higher triglycerides.
~
Is HFCS Bad News?
~
HFCS is made by processing corn syrup to create a blend of two simple sugars: fructose and glucose. The result is a cheap sweetener used in a wide array of sugary drinks and processed foods, such as regular sodas, energy drinks, sweetened fruit drinks, candies, desserts, canned fruits, jams, yogurt, condiments, soups, spaghetti sauce, crackers, cereals, and breads.
~
In the Princeton study, rats given HFCS gained more weight than those given sucrose (a.k.a. table sugar). This was true even when their calorie intake was the same. Over a period of months, rats fed HFCS also developed higher triglycerides and abnormal increases in abdominal fat. When such changes occur together in humans, they increase the risk for heart disease and type 2 diabetes.
~
The Effect on Triglycerides
~
Scientists are just starting to sort out how HFCS and triglycerides might be linked.
~
Fructose vs. Glucose
~
There has been little research done comparing the effects of HFCS with those of pure fructose or pure glucose. Pure fructose—found naturally in fruit—is broken down and used by the body differently from glucose.
~
Studies show that eating a lot of fructose may raise triglyceride levels after meals. If this eating pattern continues for weeks, it may lead to higher triglyceride levels at other times, too. The triglyceride-raising effect may be stronger in men and in women after menopause than in younger women. Compared to glucose, fructose also may decrease insulin sensitivity and increase belly fat—risk factors for heart disease and diabetes that often go hand-in-hand with elevated triglycerides.
~
HFCS vs. Sucrose
~
In real life, most sugar in the U.S. diet isn’t pure fructose or glucose. Instead, it’s HFCS or sucrose. The latter are both compounds made of fructose and glucose, but there are key differences between them. First, sucrose contains equal parts fructose and glucose. But HFCS contains unequal amounts and often is a bit heavier on the fructose side. Second, the fructose molecules in HFCS, unlike those in sucrose, are “free” and “unbound.” This means they’re easier for the body to use.
~
Theoretically, these differences could account for the different effects seen in rats fed HFCS or sucrose. Researchers think similar effects may occur in people as well. But more research in humans is needed before any firm conclusions can be drawn.
~
Short and Sweet Advice
~
What does this mean for you? To help manage not only your triglycerides but also your weight, it’s best to limit all added sugars. That’s any form of sugar put into a food or drink during processing, cooking, or serving. The American Heart Association says such sugars should add up to no more than 150 calories (about 9 teaspoons) per day for men or 100 calories (about 6 teaspoons) per day for women.
~
Reaching this goal isn’t easy; the average American currently gets more than two to three times that many calories per day from sugar. But every little bit helps.
~
Keep reading those food labels. If you see HFCS listed there, you might want to give your food or drink choice a second thought.

10 Things Packing On Pounds

Posted in LIFESTYLE CHANGES tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 3:53 pm by PCOSLady

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2011/03/30/what-are-the-10-things-that-can-pack-on-pounds.aspx
~
by Dr Mercola
~
What are the 10 Things that Can Pack on Pounds?
~
#1: To Lose Weight You MUST Eliminate Fructose from Your Diet
~ You’ve gone to all the trouble of getting some exercise. But despite sticking to your new plan you discover the pounds are not coming off.
~
You ask yourself, “Why?”
~
It is important to understand and know that while exercise is important and crucial for weight loss and I am a major fan, the foods you choose to eat are THREE times more important for controlling your weight than your exercise. It’s very easy to sabotage yourself with sugary foods and exercise beverages. Especially beverages containing HFCS.
~
# 2 You MUST Plan Your Meals
~ It’s said that failing to plan means you’re planning to fail. When it comes to meals designed to promote your health and eliminate unwanted calories, you’re going to have to heed this advice.
The problem is, if you fail to plan your meals you are basically eating according to either your emotions or whatever whim may come over you around mealtime. Both of these can mean added calories, poor nutritional choices and a growing waistline.
~
#3 Avoid All Sodas, and Especially Diet Soda
~ Soda, in my opinion, is the one of the primary health threats. Did you know that just one can of Coke contains 10 teaspoons of sugar?!
This is 100 percent of your recommended daily intake (which is more than double my recommended daily allowance to begin with). Within 20 minutes of drinking that soda, your blood sugar spikes, and your liver responds to the resulting insulin burst by turning massive amounts of sugar into fat.
~
#4 Be Sure to Eat PLENTY of Organic Vegetables
~ One of the best ways to improve your health is to make sure you’re eating plenty of fresh, minimally processed high quality vegetables, ideally locally-grown and organic, with a majority of them consumed raw. One simple way to boost your vegetable intake is to juice them. Juicing organic vegetables is something that I highly recommend to anyone working to restore or improve their health.
~
#5 Make Sure You Do Sprint 8 Exercises Once or Twice a Week
~ Your body has three types of muscle fiber: Slow twitch, fast twitch and super-fast twitch fibers. A major problem with conventional exercise is its inability to engage the fast and super-fast twitch muscle fibers. Conventional exercise merely engages your body’s slow twitch muscle fibers, which is your preferred mode of muscle engagement. To produce dramatic results when it comes to exercise you simply have to engage your fast and super-fast muscle fibers.
The best way to do this is through something called Sprint 8 exercises.
Sprint 8-style exercise has many benefits, the biggest being it naturally increases your body’s production of human growth hormone (HGH), which plays a significant role in the aging process.
~
#6 Avoid Drinking Fruit Juice
~ Fruit juice is probably the most requested drink by children of all ages, not because it quenches thirst, but because it tastes good. And fruit juice, it turns out, is not one of the best things you can put into your body, especially for children. Drinking fruit juice is only slightly different from drinking soda. Both deliver a massive dose of sugar to your body unbound by any of the slow-releasing mechanisms provided by nature.
~
#7 Eating Outside of Your Home
~ There’s a reason your favorite restaurant food often tastes better than your home cooked meals: many times it’s loaded with extra calories in the form of sugars, hydrogenated fats and artificial flavor enhancers like MSG.
~
#8 Avoid Excessive Alcohol Consumption
~ Alcohol is converted by your body into simple sugar, and it turns out the metabolic pathway converting alcohol into its simple sugar components is the same pathway your body uses to convert high fructose corn syrup into its component parts.
~
#9 Avoid Consuming Fast- or Processed Foods
~ Avoid fast food if you value your health. It is loaded with sodium, sugar and feedlot animals who have been subjected to the absolute minimums in the areas of feeding and care.
~
#10 Avoid Condiments and Idle Snacks
~ www.fitsugar.com will explain why…
~
SITES
~
Artificial Sweeteners Cause Greater Weight Gain than Sugar
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/12/04/saccharin-aspartame-dangers.aspx?e_cid=20121204_DNL_art_1
~ Dr Mercola … Artificial Sweeteners Cause Greater Weight Gain than Sugar, Yet Another Study Reveal … December 04, 2012
~
New Belly Fat Weight Loss Exercise Takes Less Time and Works …
Sprint 8-style exercise

http://www.emaxhealth.com/8782/new-belly-fat-weight-loss-exercise-takes-less-time-and-works-better-say-researchers
~ EMaxHealth … By Timothy Boyer on June 29, 2012 … Research has demonstrated that a 20-minute workout consisting of 8 seconds of sprint exercise, … The fast-paced LifeSprints style of exercise includes the use of cycling, boxing …
~
GOOGLE:
* fast food dangers
* aspartame dangers
* processed food dangers
* MSG dangers
* hydrogenated fats dangers
* trans fats dangers
* fruit juice dangers
* soda dangers
* diet soda dangers
Sprint 8-style exercise
HGH
human growth hormone
* alcohol consumption dangers

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