March 20, 2013

Parasites: Protect Yourself

Posted in PARASITES tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 6:17 pm by PCOSLady

PCOS Lady:
Research says 90% of the US are infected with “bad” parasites today! Most doctors are not trained in them or do not care to make you healthy! Most all the labs you use are not equipped to test for every bad parasite known, only testing 40 to 50 of the common types…
~ http://www.ParasiteTesting.com checks for every living parasite known in the world!
~ The New Jersey microbiology lab rep told me “there are no bad parasites in the US and you can’t get parasites in your mouth…” (Tells me the government wants us sick! Drug companies, insurance companies and doctors get wealthy off YOU!)
~ Dr Hulda Clark found bad parasites &/or pollutants cause most medical conditions in her 30+ years of practice and research…
~ Google your symptom and add parasites after it and read… Learn the truth!
~ “YOU” know your body and are in control of you and your treatment!
~ I post alot about symptoms and parasites… They overlap and are the keys to being diagnosed and getting healthy!
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Dr Oz is watched by many today… I have posted his pieces on here for you…
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PARASITES: Protect Yourself!
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http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/protect-yourself-parasites
~ Dr Oz
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Protect Yourself from Parasites
* How you and your family can avoid giving bloodsuckers a free ride *
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Added to Articles on Mon 09/28/2009
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Just the thought of parasites can make your skin crawl. These uninvited passengers burrow, hook and hunker down to feast on the blood and body of unsuspecting hosts. However, some host-parasite relationships can be mutually beneficial: The bacteria living quietly in our gut help us with digestion and immune function.
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But not all parasitic relationships are love affairs, and although many people think parasites only affect those in underdeveloped countries, infection and disease is common everywhere, even in places where sanitation, personal hygiene and safe food-handling practices are routine.
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When it comes to human disease there are 3 types of parasites that feast at the human table.

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~ Protozoa – one-celled organisms that live and multiply in the blood or tissue of humans. They infect the body via mosquitoes and flies, and are found in soil and water.
~ Helminths – parasitic flatworms, flukes, tapeworms, thorny-headed worms, roundworms and pinworms. They live in the gastrointestinal tract, blood, lymphatic system and other tissues.
~ Ectoparasites – ticks, fleas, lice, and mites that live on the surface of a human host and attach or burrow into the skin.
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There are a host of parasitic infections that cause disease in humans. The effect can range from mildly annoying to life threatening. Malaria is the most prevalent parasitic disease worldwide killing more than 1 million people each year, while trichomoniasis, a common vaginal infection, is the most common parasitic infection in the US.
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Here are some parasitic diseases found on our doorstep.
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Ascariasis (roundworm) – The eggs produced by roundworms living in soil are transmitted to humans when they are swallowed. The eggs hatch into worms in the intestines, that cause pain and vomiting, and can also travel through the bloodstream to the lungs to cause wheezing and coughing. The eggs can be transmitted via human feces found in fields, streets, and back yards.
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Pediculosis (lice) – Lice can infect the human head, body and pubic hair. They are spread by close contact with another infected person or contaminated furniture or clothing.
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Giardiasis (giardia) – Giardiasis comes from drinking or coming into contact with water, feces (human and animal), food, hands or objects contaminated with the giardia larvae. It causes diarrhea, abdominal cramps, greasy stools, dehydration and weight loss.
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Trichomoniasis (trich) -The trichomonas parasite is a sexually transmitted disease that infects the vagina and urogential tract.
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Cryptosporidiosis (crypto) – A protozoa that infects the gastrointestinal tract causing life-threatening diarrhea, particularly in immunocompromised people.
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Toxoplasmosis – Is primarily transmitted when infected undercooked meat is eaten. It also infects domestic cats, who can release eggs in their feces to later infect their human caretakers. The parasite does not become infectious until 1 to 5 days after it is shed in a cat’s feces. It can cause mild aches and pains and severe damage to the brain, eyes, or other organs.
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Scabies (mites) – Mites burrow into the upper layer of the skin to lay eggs. The pimple-like “S-shaped” rash is intensely itchy. It is easily contracted through skin-to-skin contact with an infected person and can be acquired during sexual encounters.
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Enterobiasis (pinworm) – Is cause by a roundworm (nematode) and infects the colon and rectum. Female pinworms crawl out of the intestines through the anus and deposit their eggs on the surrounding skin, usually when a person is sleeping. The eggs are transferred to the mouth of a new host from hands that have come in contact with egg-contaminated food, clothing or bedding where they can survive for 2 to 3 weeks.
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Besides the obvious – avoiding direct contact with an infected person or contaminated items – there are some effective weapons for keeping parasitic diseases out of range.
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Water Guns
~ Don’t drink water or use ice made from lakes, rivers, springs, streams or poorly monitored or maintained wells
~ Avoid swallowing recreational water in swimming pools, water parks, hot tubs, spas and fountains
~ Do not swim if you are infected or are experiencing diarrhea to protect others
~ Pay attention to public health department water advisories and do not drink untreated tap water during community-wide outbreaks of disease
~ Heat water to a rolling boil for at least 1 minute or use a NSF-rated filter that has an absolute pore size of 1 micron or smaller if water potability is uncertain
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Food Fighters
~ Use uncontaminated water to wash all food that is to be eaten raw, or peel them
~ Avoid drinking unpasteurized milk or dairy products
~ Avoid eating food from street vendors
~ Cook beef, lamb, veal roasts and steaks to 145degF; pork, ground meat, and wild game to 160degF, and poultry to 180degF in the thigh (can also freeze meat for a few weeks)
~ Do not taste meat until it is fully cooked
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Body Blockers
~ Wash hands thoroughly and frequently with soap and water especially after using the toilet, before handling or eating food and before and after every diaper change
~ Wear gloves when doing gardening or working in soil and sand
~ Keep fingernails clean and short and avoid biting nails
~ Avoid scratching the skin in the anal area
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Dirt Busters
~ Clean anything that may be contaminated with feces such as bathroom fixtures, changing tables, diaper pails and toys regularly
~ Wash cutting boards, dishes, counters, utensils, and hands with hot soapy water after contact with raw meat, poultry, seafood, or unwashed fruits or vegetables
~ Change litter boxes daily and avoid getting a new cat or cleaning a cat’s litter box if you are pregnant
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SITES
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Dr Oz on Parasites
https://www.google.com/search?q=Dr+Oz+parasites+show&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a
~ Dr Oz… Look through his episodes about parasites… How to tell you may have them, they types, what they feast on in you, etc… View all his episodes and talks about them…
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GOOGLE:
parasites
Dr Oz parasites

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April 6, 2012

Cardiometabolics

Posted in LIFESTYLE CHANGES tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 4:57 am by PCOSLady

Cardiometabolics
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The biggest health problem facing the world today is from the
combined impact of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.
It is critical that physicians and health care providers understand
the predictive relationship between metabolic risk factors and cardiovascular disease and employ aggressive intervention strategies to prevent and/or delay disease progression.
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The 2012 Cardiometabolic Health Congress (CMHC) will take place October 10-13, 2012, at the Westin Boston Waterfront, in Boston, MA. The CMHC is currently working to design the 2012 curriculum to provide the most effective, current strategies for the prevention, diagnosis, and management of type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, thrombosis, chronic kidney disease, and related comorbidities. Join our mailing list to be the first to receive the latest and greatest information regarding the 2012 CMHC program agenda and faculty.
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The 2011 CMHC took place October 19-22, 2011 at the Sheraton Hotel, in Boston, MA, and was our most successful program yet. Over
1300 U.S.-based practicing clinicians joined our expert-level forum — translating the latest clinical data into practical strategies to prevent, delay, and manage cardiometabolic risk.
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http://www.cardiometabolichealth.org/
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Metabolic Syndrome
Metabolic syndrome is a long-recognized medical condition, but has been defined only recently. A person is diagnosed with the syndrome when he or she has three of these five disorders affecting metabolism:
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~ High blood pressure
~ High blood sugar
~ High triglycerides
~ Low HDL (‘good’) cholesterol
~ Abdominal obesity
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Although any of these factors alone is unhealthy, the net effect of having at least three of these disorders is even worse, dramatically increasing the risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. In fact, metabolic syndrome carries the same cardiovascular risk as smoking two packs of cigarettes a day. The good news is that intervention and treatment in a comprehensive program can decrease cardiovascular risk and prevent the onset of diabetes.
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Google:
cardiometabolics
cardio metaboplic?
cardio metabolic syndrome
cardiometabolics risk
cardio metabolic health
cardio metabolic disease
cardiometabolics definition

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