December 14, 2013

The American Parasite ~ Yeast

Posted in ASPARTAME, INFECTIONS - FUNGAL, PARASITES, THE AMERICAN PARASITE, WAKE UP FYI tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 6:11 pm by PCOSLady


PCOS Lady:
Yeast we know is in food, we did know yeast was hidden in foods nor that antibiotics promote the growth of yeast…

Try a
~ Yeast cleanse
~ Eating more natural foods
~ Adding a probiotic daily

The video explains everything to you…
~ YOU will see where your good money is being wasted!
~ YOU will realize you are helping make yourself sick, etc…. Yes, government and food industry created!

Antibiotics do leave behind more yeast to grow inside you!
Expired breads, cakes, rolls, etc… has live yeast that will grow in you as well…

There are a few self tests you need to do at home to find out if you suffer from yeast overgrowth… The link is below for you…

* Yeast feeds on refined sugars, preservatives, artificial sweetners *
~ Your cravings start up and increase to feed the yeast beast in your gut!

(Candida Albicans)

Thank you to the National Candida Center

Reviewing the signs and symptoms to determine if you have Candida Albicans yeast infection Overgrowth.

Candida Albicans yeast infection Overgrowth, Candida Overgrowth (CO) symptoms are so numerous and seemingly unrelated that they can be confusing to both doctor and patient. The majority of people who have CO do not realize they have it until they become seriously ill. Why? Because candida yeast not only steals nutrients from the food that you eat, it then poisons the tissues with waste material containing over 75 known toxins. Candida albicans is linked, directly or indirectly, to the following list of conditions and symptoms. A “symptom” is an outward sign that points to a deeper problem.

Review the 80 likely symptoms listed below to see if any apply to you. Give yourself ONE POINT for each of those which you have had persistently (for a month or longer, either currently or at anytime in the past).

Digestive Troubles

~ Bad Breath,
~ Gas/Bloating,
~ Indigestion,
~ Diarrhea,
~ Constipation,
~ Intestinal Pain,
~ Low Blood Sugar,
~ Food / sugar cravings,
~ Mouth or stomach ulcers,
~ Allergies (Air or Food),
~ Food Sensitivities,
~ Heartburn,
~ Dry Mouth,
~ Receding Gums,
~ Hemorrhoids, rectal itch
~ Irritable bowel.


~ Anti-social Behavior,
~ Suicidal Tendencies,
~ Insomnia,
~ Depression,
~ Anxiety, high strung.
~ Irritability.

Skin & Joint Problems

~ Thrush, Diaper Rash,
~ Acne, Skin Rash or Hives,
~ Dry Skin & Itching,
~ Finger, toe or foot Fungus,
~ Athlete’s Foot,
~ Liver Spots,
~ Water Retention,
~ Joint Pain,
~ Muscle Aches,
~ Numbness.


~ Hyperactivity
~ Attention Deficit Disorder,
~ Lack of Impulse Control,

Female Problems

~ Infertility,
~ Vaginal Yeast Infection,
~ Menstrual Problems,
~ PMS Symptoms,
~ Bladder Infections,
~ Endometriosis,
~ No Sex Drive,
~ Hormonal Imbalance,
~ Iron Deficiency.

Mental & Emotional

~ Dizziness,
~ Mental Fogginess, (Confused, spaced-out, blank stares, day dreaming)
~ Inability to Concentrate (Having to re-read the same thing twice)
~ Poor memory (Where are my car keys? or, Why did I come into this room?)
~ Mood Swings,
~ Headaches.

Immune Problems

~ Lethargic/Laziness,
~ Chronic Fatigue,
~ Asthma, Hay Fever,
~ Colds & Flu,
~ Puffy Eyes,
~ Respiratory Problems,
~ Chemical Sensitivity,
~ Epstein Barr Virus,
~ Adrenal/Thyroid Failure,
~ Cold/Shaky,
~ Ear Infections,
~ Chronic sore throat,
~ Post nasal drip,
~ Hair Loss,
~ Stuffed sinus (sinusitis),
~ Overweight,
~ Underweight,
~ Diabetes,
~ Burning Eyes,
~ Premature Aging,
~ Autism

YOUR ADDED SCORE IS _____ (one point per symptom)

0-4 points – Indicates variations of normal living (unless persistent and severe).
5-9 Points – Indicates a Clear Pattern shows likely development of CO dysbiosis.
10 or more – Indicates Strong Pattern and almost certain CO dysbiosis.
VIDEO: The American Parasite
Keybiotics – Ultimate Gut Flora Balance & Immune Support
~ Whole Body research … Keybiotics is a super probiotic containing 37.5 Billion CFUs and 14 unique strains of beneficial bacteria, designed to balance your gut quickly while working to balance your gut to 80 vs 20 balance…
Quick Print:
National Candida Center
~ National Candida Center…
~ Self Test: … Spit Test.
The best time to do this test is the first thing in the morning as soon as you wake up. Before you rinse, spit, or put anything in your mouth, go get a glass of water (in a clear glass). Now build up a bunch of saliva (just mouth saliva, do not cough up anything) and spit it into the glass of water. Observe what happens.
My Body Fluids The saliva will float. That is OK and normal. If within 15 minutes you see thin projections extending downward into the water, it is a positive sign for candida. The projections may look like hair, or small strings, like a jelly fish or spider legs, moving down into the water from the saliva floating on the top. Other positive indications might be very “cloudy” saliva that will sink to the bottom of the glass within a few minutes or particles that slowly sink or suspend below the saliva glob. What you are seeing are colonies of yeast which band together to form the strings.
LEAKY GUT ~ CO Dysbiosis
It is estimated that over 30 million people in the U.S, predominantly women, suffer from the multiple effects of an imbalance in the gastrointestinal system.
The gut has three primary functions:
~ Digestion of foods and conversion into vitamins
~ Absorption of nutrients
~ Prevention of toxins and pathogens from entering the body
When the Gut Is Healthy
Approximately 500 species of bacteria, as well as many species of yeast and other organisms, live in the human gastrointestinal tract and make up the “gut flora.” These “friendly” bacteria are vital for good digestion and the health of the intestines in general, and mostly have names beginning with “Lactobacillus” or “Bifidobacteria,” which denotes the class of bacteria they belong to. You may have noticed food products like yogurt and acidophilus milk that contain these bacteria. It is becoming more common for them to be added, just as vitamins and minerals are frequently added to breakfast cereals, for example.
When the gut flora is in a healthy balance it is called “orthobiosis,” which is a term introduced in the early 1900s by the great microbiologist Elie Metchnikoff. When our gut is out of balance we are said to have “dysbiosis.” Metchnikoff thought dysbiosis so concerning that he coined the expression “Death begins in the GUT!”
What Can Go Wrong?
Not all of the hundreds of species of organisms that make up the gut flora are “friendly.” There are also a number of organisms that don’t provide the body with any benefits, or do so only when their numbers are kept low by competing friendly bacteria. Such microorganisms include coliform bacteria (E.coli, etc.), yeasts/fungus, parasites, and bacteroides.
Illness can occur when the amount of friendly bacteria is reduced and the other organisms are able to increase their numbers and become the majority. There are a number of factors that can disrupt the balance of organisms in the intestines and lead to overgrowth of the less desirable species.
The most important factors are:
~ Antibiotic use (abuse)
~ Use of the birth control pill
~ Use of other hormones, especially immunosuppressants like steroids
~ Diet, especially one high in sugar
~ Alcohol
~ Stress
Conditions often caused by dysbiosis include Irritable Bowel Syndrome, acne, food allergies, Chronic Fatigue and depression. But you can help repopulate the good bacteria by eating foods that contain natural, healthy bacterias, including yogurt and acidophilus milk. You also can take an acidophilus supplement and something called Fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS), which is a plant-based supplement that serves as a “super food” for these good bacteria.
Gut dysbiosis can lead to changes in the lining of the bowel that increases the permeability of the intestine, resulting in leaky gut syndrome.
Symptoms of Leaky Gut Syndrome / Intestinal Permeability
Symptoms include:

abdominal pain ~ asthma ~ chronic joint pain ~ chronic muscle pain ~ confusion ~ fuzzy or foggy thinking ~ gas ~ indigestion ~ mood swings ~ nervousness ~ poor immunity ~ recurrent vaginal infections ~ skin rashes ~ diarrhea ~ bed-wetting ~ recurrent bladder infections ~ poor memory ~ shortness of breath ~ constipation ~ bloating ~ aggressive behavior ~ anxiety ~ poor libido ~ fatigue ~ and just feeling “toxic”.
Leaky gut syndrome is associated with the following conditions:
Bloating and weight gain ~ Chronic fatigue syndrome ~ Celiac disease ~ Crohn’s disease ~ Environmental illness ~ Hives ~ Acne ~ Allergies ~ Inflammatory joint disease / arthritis ~ Intestinal infections ~ Pancreatic insufficiency ~ Ulcerative colitis ~ Giardia ~ Eczema ~ Psoriasis ~ Food allergies and sensitivities ~ Liver dysfunction ~ Rheumatoid arthritis ~ Irritable bowel syndrome
When the natural yeast or fungi found in the body grows out of control, it can result in a condition called Candidiasis, an infection caused by a species of Candida fungi, especially Candida albicans. These fungi are found almost everywhere in the environment, and some may live harmlessly along with the abundant “native” species of bacteria that normally colonize the mouth, gastrointestinal tract and vagina. The growth of Candida is usually controlled by the presence of the native bacteria and by the body’s immune defenses. If the population of native bacteria is decreased, especially by antibiotics, or if the immune defenses are weakened by illness malnutrition, or certain medications (corticosteroids or anticancer drugs), Candida fungi can multiply enough to cause symptoms by spewing many toxins into the bloodstream and liver. It can affect many different parts of the body, causing either localized infections or overwhelming illness, depending on the patient and his or her underlying health.
Candidiasis can usually be found in exposed and most part of the body, such as the mouth and throat (called thrush), the vagina (usually called a yeast infection), and in the case of children, as diaper rash. Candidiasis can overwhelm the whole body, and in some people can result in not only stomach distress such as bloating and gas, but also in fatigue, depression, anxiety, skin eruptions, and immune system malfunction.


February 28, 2013

Parasite Test Truth!

Posted in IBS, MORGELLONS~NCS, PARASITES, WAKE UP FYI tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 6:39 pm by PCOSLady

Parasite Test Truth!
PCOS Lady:
This woman’s experience is exactly what i am going through! Unnecessary tests from the wrong lab(s), wrong type tests ordered, wasted gas, wasted money to pay for those unnecessary tests, etc… I now have a out of pocket bill for $900 for tests and should have only spent $485 at the Parasitology Center in Arizona and been fully confident in their findings and trusted their treatments!
~ Now i have to prove to my insurance i need the proper testing done at the right lab!
All i needed were the proper scripts to the correct lab, in Arizona! After all they literally test for every known parasite to man in the world!
Many of you are experiencing “bad” parasites and do not know it…
You may accept them with excuses like:
~ I’m aging
~ My chemistry has changed inside …
~ I ate something wrong …
~ I can’t eat that food anymore… Bad parasites hate acidic foods like pineapple and vinegars!
~ I’m not feeling well, it will pass…
~ I barfed my meal, ok no big deal something did not agree with me…
~ OK, i have diarrhea a few days, it will pass…
~ My doctor says i have IBS, just an upset stomach, etc…
~ My tests came back normal…
~ It’s my time to start getting sick…
Yada, yada, yada the EXCUSES KEEP MOUNTING and all the while “YOU” are getting sicker inside… You finally may do something when you start calling out of work, need a doctor, need an operation, you see your looks start getting “ugly”, hair is falling out more, nails are brittle or discoloring just to prove a point here!
Ladies, menstrual problems most likely are “bad” parasites! I urge you to be tested before any surgery and expensive treatments, etc…
~ Consider being properly tested if you have had miscarriages as well…
I strongly urge you to read through my Parasite and Morgellon posts…
~ Read up on Celiac Disease, Aspartame symptoms too! They can be fatal…
~ After taking antibiotics have you done a yeast cleanse that year? Docs rarely tell you to!
~ The medical world and such do not want you knowing the truths!
I copied her piece on lab tests to bring specific attention to the facts that most labs are not equipped to test for “bad” parasites in “YOU“!!!!!
Parasites, A Modern Epidemic gives you her journal of getting healthy after bad parasites…
~ She tells of the interesting truths of what we go through to get tested for parasites at almost every lab!
Parasites, A Modern Epidemic
by Garcia Thompson
~ ~ ~
Realize that although you may not feel ill or tired, there may still be parasites within your system. Parasitic infections are masters at hiding while feeding off the human body. So, how can you tell? You can try to take a medical test, but as Dr Andersen (a leading authority on parasitic infections) has said:
If you were tested by a doctor for parasites, chances are the results would come back negative. Does this mean you do not have parasites? Unfortunately, medical testing procedures only catch about 20% of the actual cases of parasites. Over a 1,000 species of parasites can live in your body and tests are available for approximately 40 to 50 types. This means, doctors are only testing for about 5% of the parasites and missing 80% of those. This brings the clinically found parasites down to 1%. Now, if I had a 1% chance of winning in the stock market, I don’t think I would invest. Only 1% of parasites are ever clinically found.
I went through a medical test that cost me $400, was sent to a “top lab” for the detection of parasites, and still was diagnosed as negative (yet after a few cleanses I have been flushing infections, toxins and parasites from my body daily.) So, although there is a chance the lab test will catch the infection, the likelihood is that it won’t. (the major problem is that the parasites must not only be on the “list” the lab looks for, but also must be laying eggs when the samples are taken.)

Dr Ross Andersen:
Quote: “Parasites are one of the most undiagnosed health challenges in the U.S.”
~ A statement based on his 20 years of experience with over 20,000 patients.
Parasites are the Silent Invasion, what you should know about parasite infestation.
According to the World Health Organization, 3.5 billion people suffer from some type of parasitic infection. Not all of these people live in third world countries; many in the developed world have any number of parasitic infections, some of which are so highly contagious that extremely casual contact with something that has been handled by an infected person can infect another person.
All people suffer from parasites of one type or another during their lifetimes.
~ EG Bacteria are always at the root of bowel problems, such as pain, bloating and gassiness.
The Parasitology Center’s Dr Amin has found H. pylori in most IBS cases… They have a specific test for it…
Dr Omar Amin
Dr Andersen
Dr Ross Andersen
Dr Andersen parasidic infections
IBS H pylori
EG Bacteria

December 15, 2012

Gluten Intolerance

Posted in CELIAC DISEASE tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 5:26 pm by PCOSLady

PCOS Lady:
Gluten Intolerance and Celiac Disease can be wicked to and in you… Three sets of symptoms are listed for you with the sites… The symptoms overlap other medical conditions… Headaches may be explained by being tested for one of these conditions…
~ I stress everyone be tested for Celiac Disease to know…
FACT: Most doctors can not draw a diagnosis from all your symptoms! They jump to diagnose you on a few only, hence a misdiagnosis!
FACT: Most doctors can not read your blood tests as a whole, only a few results they understand together…
~ I suggest you see an Endocrinologist, who specializes on internal chemistry, etc… (especially Diabetes)
SYMPTOMS COUNT! ~ All your symptoms… ~ Keep track of them… ~ It is your life!
Gluten Intolerance Symptoms – How Do You Know If Gluten Is Making You Sick?
* What are gluten intolerance symptoms?
* Are people with gluten intolerance just fussy eaters with a new excuse for their picky food habits?
Research shows that gluten sensitivity in some form, including celiac disease and mild gluten intolerance, affects approximately 15% of the US population. These statistics are likely to be similar in Western countries with similar health issues and dietary patterns.
~ Are you one of these people?
~ How do you recognize gluten intolerance symptoms?
First of all let’s * identify the difference between celiac disease and gluten intolerance. Celiac disease is an immune reaction, a severe sudden onset allergic reaction, to the protein called gluten. This is commonly found in grains such as wheat, rye, barley and oats. While celiac disease is initially an auto-immune disorder, it is also a disease of malabsorption, because essential nutrients are not absorbed. Therefore one of the most devastating symptoms of long-term undiagnosed celiac disease is malnutrition.
Gluten intolerance often has a slower onset than celiac disease, and may be hard to diagnose due to the broad range of symptoms and causes.
If you imagine a continuum of gluten intolerance symptoms, celiac disease is usually at the most extreme end with immediate autoimmune reactions. Some people with celiac disease may not have symptoms, but internally malabsorption and malnutrition can erode health over many years. Both celiac disease and gluten intolerance can be exacerbated by emotional stress, infection, surgery, pregnancy and childbirth. Every individual with some level of gluten intolerance or allergy may experience different shades of symptoms, hence the challenge for medical practitioners to diagnose.
So what are the specific symptoms of gluten intolerance and
celiac disease?

~ Weight loss or weight gain
~ Nutritional deficiencies due to malabsorption e.g. low iron levels
~ Gastro-intestinal problems (bloating, pain, gas, constipation, diarrhea)
~ Fat in the stools (due to poor digestion)
~ Aching joints
~ Depression
~ Eczema
~ Head aches
~ Exhaustion
~ Irritability and behavioural changes
~ Infertility, irregular menstrual cycle and miscarriage
~ Cramps, tingling and numbness
~ Slow infant and child growth
~ Decline in dental health
Undiagnosed for long periods of time, food intolerances have been found to contribute to diabetes, bowel cancer, anemia and osteoporosis.
Continue reading at site:
~ Gluten Free Network … Info, symptoms, recipes…
Understanding Gluten-Free Special Diets
~ Dummies … Symptoms of Gluten Sensitivity and Celiac Disease … #4 of 7 in series segments …
Celiac disease and gluten sensitivity share some of the same symptoms. Although the actual damage occurs in the gastrointestinal tract, specifically in the small intestine, the symptoms manifest in many different ways and often show up throughout your entire body.
Gluten sensitivity and celiac disease have hundreds of symptoms; the following lists don’t contain them all, but are a good sampling:
* Gastrointestinal symptoms: These are some of the “classic” — although not the most common — symptoms of celiac disease:
~ Abdominal pain and distension
~ Acid reflux
~ Bloating
~ Constipation
~ Diarrhea
~ Gas and flatulence
~ Greasy, foul-smelling, floating stools
~ Nausea
~ Vomiting
~ Weight loss or weight gain
* Nongastrointestinal symptoms: Interestingly, although gluten sensitivity and celiac disease affect the gut, most people’s symptoms are not gastrointestinal in nature. This partial list includes just some of the more than 250 symptoms not centered in the digestive tract.
~ Fatigue and weakness (due to iron-deficiency anemia)
~ Vitamin and/or mineral deficiencies
~ Headaches (including migraines)
~ Joint/bone pain
~ Depression, irritability, listlessness, and mood disorders
~ “Fuzzy brain” or an inability to concentrate
~ Infertility
~ Abnormal menstrual cycles
~ Dental enamel deficiencies and irregularities
~ Seizures
~ Clumsiness (ataxia)
~ Nerve damage (peripheral neuropathy)
~ Respiratory problems
~ Canker sores (apthus ulcers)
~ Lactose intolerance
~ Eczema/psoriasis
~ Rosacea (a skin disorder)
~ Acne
~ Hashimoto’s disease, Sjögren’s syndrome, lupus erythematosus, and other autoimmune disorders
~ Early onset osteoporosis
~ Hair loss (alopecia)
~ Bruising easily
~ Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
~ Muscle cramping
~ Nosebleeds
~ Swelling and inflammation
~ Night blindness
~ Web MD … What to know about celiac disease, gluten sensitivity, and gluten-free diets. … Lactose Intolerance Symptoms · Gluten-Free Recipes.
Gluten Sensitivity Symptoms
~ About’s Celiac Disease … Gluten Sensitivity Symptoms, forum, info, etc…
Why You Should Eliminate Wheat from Your Diet|maing9|dl8|sec1_lnk2%26pLid%3D245778
~ Kitchen Daily … Why You Should Eliminate Wheat from Your Diet … Gluten, a protein composite of gliadin and glutenin found in wheat and grains, may be addictive. Perhaps this explains the uncontrollable cravings for carbs many of us experience. This news was hard for us to digest, but not nearly as hard as gluten is on our intestines.
Since the 1950s, when scientists began cross-breeding wheat to make it grow faster, we’ve seen a few issues arise. Wheat is not as healthy as it used to be. U.S. plant scientist, Norman Borlaug, who won the the Nobel Prize for his work in wheat hybridization may have introduced some compounds that aren’t exactly friendly to our bodies. In fact, there are proteins found in today’s wheat that scientists can’t trace back to the original plant.
What could this mean for you? Unfortunately, digestion issues along with a slew of potential diseases, such as celiac’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and IBS. These problems can pertain to anyone, not just to those with severe gluten reactions or celiac’s disease.
Wheat & Gluten Research: The Dark Side of Wheat
~ Green Med Info … Despite popular opinion wheat consumption may not be beneficial to health. These two published articles make a strong argument against perceiving wheat intolerance as simply a matter of allergy/genetic intolerance in a minority subset of the human population, but rather as a species-specific intolerance, applicable to all.
Journal of Gluten Sensitivity
~ Celiac … Subscribe to Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.
Food Sensitivity Journal: The Case for Gluten Sensitivity Testing
~ Food Sensitivity Journal … Nov 16, 2010 – There is widespread agreement that celiac disease and gluten sensitivity are under diagnosed. Joseph Murray, M.D., from the Mayo Clinic …Find gluten free recipes and interesting information…
~ Immunitrition … A helpful resource to learn about cultured and fermented foods.
~ Immunitrition’s Online store
~ The WEBstaurant Store … Restaurant equipment and supplies…
gluten intolerance
gluten free recipes
gluten allergy
celiac disease
rheumatoid arthritis gluten
IBS gluten
diabetes gluten
bowel cancer gluten
anemia gluten
osteoporosis gluten
Lactose intolerance
Journal of Gluten Sensitivity

August 21, 2012


Posted in DR OMAR AMIN, PARASITES tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 9:06 pm by PCOSLady

PCOS Lady:
I have spoken several times with this man in the past… He has enlightened me to what parasites are about!
I trust him and his lab completely…
Here are Dr Omar Amin’s credentials for you to compare to the doctor(s) you or your doctor want you to be seen by and treated by…
The Parasitology Lab will tell you what prescriptions you need to kill the parasites found in you!

Dr Omar M. Amin…
Respected: Dr Amin, centre, is a world-renowned researcher of diseases
Welcome to the Parasitology Center specializing in the diagnosis and management
of parasites in humans by world renown Parasitologist Dr. Omar M. Amin
Institute of Parasitic Disease Parasitology Center, Inc.
PO Box 28372 903 S. Rural Rd. #101-318
Tempe, AZ 85285 Tempe, AZ 85281
Phone: 480-767-2522
Fax: 480-767-5855
Most parasites in humans are cosmopolitan. The following are the most common symptoms of parasites in humans:

Dr. Omar Amin
Resume of Dr. Omar M. Amin

Web address:

Ph. D. Zoology & Parasitology, Arizona State University (ASU), Tempe, 1968.
M. Sc. Medical Entomology, Cairo University, Egypt, 1963.
B. Sc. Agricultural Sciences (Zoology & Botany), Cairo University, 1959.
Other courses of Study
Center for Disease Control (CDC), Atlanta, training courses:
Identification and biology of arthropods of public health importance.
Arthropod borne encephalitis.
Communicable disease control, new techniques and developments.
Employment and Experience
1992- : Director, Institute of Parasitic Diseases (IPD) & Parasitology Center, Inc. (PCI), AZ
1971-92: Professor of Parasitology, Allied Health, and Biology, University of Wisconsin, WI.
1969-70: Visiting Fellow, Virology Sect., Center for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA. Research on Rocky Mountain spotted fever/tick vectors.
1967-69: Biology instructor and Post-doctoral Research Assoc. (bio-ecology of ticks) Old Dominion Univ. (ODU), Norfolk, VA.
1966-67: Faculty Assoc. (TA) Zoology and agriculture, ASU, Tempe, AZ.
1960-64: Research Asst., Dept of Medical Zoology, US Naval Medical Research Unit #3 (NAMRU-3), Cairo, with Harry Hoogstraal. Bio-ecology of arthropod disease vectors in Africa; field & lab research.
Teaching Experience:
Introductory Courses
General Zoology and Biology
Bioscience (cellular & physiological orientation)
Organismal Biology (oranismal-syst. & population adapt.)
Upper division Courses
Epidemiology (Environmantal Hygiene & Biology program)
Vertebrate Zoology (Biology program)
Seminar & Independent Study (Biology program)
Ecology: Science of Survival (Environmental Science program)
Insects and Disease (modular; University-wide program)
Evolution (modular; University-wide program)
Parasitology Courses
Parasitology (Medical Technology & Environmaental Hygiene programs
Human (Clinical) Parasitology (for hospital & medical personnel)
Concepts in Medical Entomology (Biology program)
Field Parasitology (research class, biology program)
Research interests and experience:
Nationally and internationally recognized authority in Parasitology, (Protozoology, Helminthology and Arthropod Ectoparasitology) with over 140 Major publications; considerable worldwide field/research and teaching experience.
Scholarships and Grants:
Foreign Senior Exchange Scholar (USIS), conduct workshops on Epidemiology & Parasitic Diseases of wildlife/man, Univ. of Bahrain, Persian Gulf, 1989.
Fulbright Scholar, Health Minstry, Bahrain, malaria epid./control, 1986-87.
Sabbatical, University of Wisonsin, 1986-87.
Univ. of Wisconsin grants, 1974, 1988-90, and annual research allocations.
Sea grant College (Wisconsin), US Dept. of Commerce, 1967, 77, 84; Great Lakes parasitology research.
Regional grants from local industry and government agencies almost annually.
University of Wisconsin Alumni Research Fund Grant, 1972.
Sigma-Xi Grant in Aid of Research, 1969, work on RMSF at ODU, Norfolk, VA.
US Army Grant DA-49-193-MD-2439, 1968, for tick studies at ODU.
Arizona State University Tuition scholarships, 1965-67; Foreign Graduate Student Scholarship, 1965-66; Graduate Teaching Asst. Scholarship, 1967.
University Service (University of Wisconsin); not inclusive
Medical Technology Administrative Committee; Executive (Bio.) Committee
Industrial and Environmental Hygiene Administrative Committee;
Chair, Dept. of Biological Sciences; Campus Concerns Comm.; Faculty Senate;
Faculty Rights and Responsibilities Committee; Academic Policies Committee;
Natural Scientific Areas Committee; Animal Welfare and Facilities Committee;
Curriculum committees; International Studies Steering Committeee;
Foreign Student Advisor (among other student organizations’ activities);
Communication Arts Auditorium and Gallery Committee.
Active Membership in Professional Societies:
American Society of Parasitologists (and the Rocky Mountain affiliate)
British Society of Parasitology
Entomological Society of America
Helminthological Society of Washington
American Microscopial Society
American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
American Society for Microbiology
Arizona Homeopathic & Integrative Medical Assoc.
Foreign Languages with reading, writing, and speaking knowledge:
Arabic and French.
Foreign Languages with reading knowledge:
Spanish, German, Russian
Publications by Dr. Omar M. Amin
1. Amin, O. M. 1966. The fleas (Siphonaptera) of Egypt: Distribution and seasonal dynamics of fleas infesting dogs in the Nile Valley and Delta of Egypt J. Med. Entomol. 3: 293-298.
2. Amin, O. M. 1968. Helminth fauna of Suckers (Castomidae) of the Gila River System, Arizona. Dissert. Abstr. 28: 3521.
3. Amin, O. M. 1968. Deformed individuals of two species of suckers, Catsomus insignus and C. clarki from the Gila River System, Arizona. Copeia 4: 862-863.
4. Amin, O. M. 1969. Helminth fauna of suckers (Castomidae) of the Gila River System, Arizona. I. Nematobothrium texomensis, McIntosh and Self, 1955 (Trematoda) and Glaridarcris confuses Hunter, 1929 (Cestoda) from buffalofish. Am. Midland Nat. 82: 429-443.
5. Amin, O. M. 1969. Helminth fauna of suckers (Castomidae) of the Gila River System, Arizona. II. Five parasites from Castomus spp. Am. Midland Nat. 82: 429-443.
6. Amin, O. M. Amin O. M. 1969. Growth of the dog tick Dermacentor variabilis Say (Acarina: Ixodidae): I. Growth pattern. J. Med. Entomol. 6(3: 305-316.
7. Amin, O. M. 1969 Growth of the dog tick Dermacentor variabilis Say (Acarina: Ixodidae): II. The effect of starvation and host species on its growth and fecundity. J. Med. Entomol. 6: 321-326.
8. Amin, O. M. and D. E. Sonenshine. 1970. Development of the American dog tick Dermacentor variabilis following partial feeding by immatures. Ann. Entomol. Soc. Am. 63: 128-133.
9. Amin, O. M. 1970. The circadian rhythm of dropping of engorged larvae and nymphs of the American dog tick Dermacentor variabilis Say (Acarina: Ixodidae). J. Med. Entomol. 7: 251-255.
10. Amin, O. M. 1973. A preliminary survey of vertebrate ectoparasites in southeastern Wisconsin. J. Med. Entomol. 10: 110-111.
11. Amin, O. M., J. S. Balsano, and K. A. Pfalzgraf. 1973. Lernaea cyprinacea Linn. (Coppepoda: Crustacea) from Root River, Wisconsin fishes. Am. Midland Nat. 89: 484-487.
12. Amin, O. M. and M. H. Madbouly. 1973. Distribution and seasonal dynamics of a tick, a louse fly, and a louse infecting dogs in the Nile Valley and Delta of Egypt. J. Med. Entomol. 10: 118-128.
13. Amin, O. M. 1973. Experimental transmission of Rocky Mountain spotted fever rickettsiae. Ga. Acad. Sci. Bull. 31: 118-128.
14. Amin, O. M. 1974. Intestinal helminthes of the white sucker, Castomus commersoni (Lacepede), in SE Wisconsin. Proc. Helminthol Soc. Wash. 41: 81-88.
15. Amin, O. M. 1974. Comb variations in the rabbit flea, Cediopsylla simplex (Baker). J. Med. Entomol. 11: 227-230.
16. Amin, O. M. and A. G. Hageman. 1974. Mosquitoes and tabanids in southeast Wisconsin. Mosquito News 34: 170-177.
17. Amin, O. M. and W. H. Thompson. 1974. Arboviral antibody survey of wild mammals in southeastern Wisconsin. Trans. Wis. Acad. Sci., Arts, Lett. 602: 303-310.
18. Amin, O. M. 1974. Distribution and ecological observations of wild mammals in southeastern Wisconsin. Trans. Wis. Acad. Sci., Arts, Lett. 62: 311-326.
19. Amin, O. M., T. r. Wells, and H. L. Gately. 1974. Comb variations in the cat flea Ctenocephalides f. felis (bouche). Ann Entomol. Soc. Am.67: 831-834.
20. Amin, O. M. 1975. Intestinal helminthes of some southeastern Wisconsin fishes. Proc. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 42: 43-46.
21. Amin, O. M. 1975. Acanthocephalus parksidei sp. n. (Acanthocephala: Echinorhynchidae) from Wisconsin fishes. J. Parasitol. 61: 301-306.
22. Amin, O. M. 1975. Variability in Acanthocephalus parksidei Amin, 1974 (Acanthocephala: Echinorhynchidae). J. Parasitol. 61: 307-317.
23. Amin, O. M. 1975. Host and seasonal associations of Acanthocephalus parksidei Amin, 1974 (Acanthocephala: Echinorhynchidae) in Wisconsin fishes. J. Parasitol. 61: 318-329.
24. Amin, O. M. 1976. Host associations and seasonal occurrence of fleas from southeastern Wisconsin mammals with observations on morphologic variations. J. Med. Entomol. 13: 179-192.
25. Amin, O. M. 1976. Lice, mites, and ticks of southeastern Wisconsin mammals. Great Lakes Entomol. 9: 195-198.
26. Amin, O. M. and J. M. Burrows. 1977. Host and seasonal associations of Echinorhynchus salmonis (Acanthocephala: Echinorhynchidae) in Lake Michigan fishes. J. Fish. Res. Board Can. 34: 325-331.
27. Amin, O. M. and R. G. Sewell. 1977. Comb variations in the squirrel and chipmunk fleas, Orchopeas h. howardii (Baker) and Megabothris acerbus (Jordan) (Siphonaptera), with notes on the significance of pronotal comb patterns. Am. Midland Nat. 98: 207-212.
28. Amin, O. M. 1977. Helminth parasites of some southeastern Lake Michigan fishes. Proc. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 44: 210-217.
29. Amin, O. M. and J. S. Mackiewicz. 1977. Proreocephalus buplanensis Mayes, 1976 (Cestoda: Proteocephalidae) from Semotilus atromaculatus in Wisconsin. Proc. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 44: 228-229.
30. Amin, O. M. 1977. (Book review). Regulation of parasite populations. G. w. Esch (ed.) Acad. Press, Inc., New York, 1977, 253p. Trans. Am. Fish. Soc. 106: 655-656.
31. Amin, O. M. 1977. Distribution of fish parasites from two southeast Wisconsin streams. Trans. Wis. Acad. Sci., Arts, Lett. 65: 225-230.
32. Amin, O. M. 1978. Intestinal helminthes of some Nile fishes near Cairo, Egypt with redescriptions of Camallanus kirandensis Baylis 1928 (Nematoda) and Bothriocephalus aegyptiacus Rysavy and Moravec 1975. (Cestoda) J. Parasitol. 64: 93-101.
33. Amin, O. M. 1978. Effect of host spawning on Echinorhynchus salmonis Muller, 1784. (Acanthocephala: Echinorhynchidae) maturation and localization. J. Fish Dis. 1: 195-197.
34. Amin, O. M. 1978. Notes on Dina lineata (O. F. Muller) Hirudinea: Erpobdellidae) from the gut of some Nile fishes in Egypt. Proc. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 45: 272-275.
35. Amin, O. M. 1978. On the crustacean hosts of larval acanthocephalan and cestode parasites in southwestern Lake Michigan. J. Parasitol. 64(5): 842-845.
36. Amin, O. M. 1979. Lymphicystis disease in Wisconsin fishes. J. Fish. Dis. 2: 207-217.
37. Amin, O. M., L. A. Burns, and M. J. Redlin. 1980. The ecology of Acanthocephalus parksedei Amin, 1975 (Acanthocephala: Echinorhynchidae) in its isopod intermediate host. Proc. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 74 : 37-46.
38. Amin, O. M. and F. G. Nwokike. 1980. Prevalence of pinworm and whipworm infestations in institutionalized mental patients in Wisconsin, 1966-1976. Wis. Med. J. 79: 31-32.
39. Amin, O. M. and M. J. Redlin. 1980. The effect of host species on growth and variability of Echinorhynchus salmonis Muller, 1784 (Acanthocephala: Echinorhynchidae), with special reference to the status of the genus. Syst. Parasitol. 2: 9-20.
40. Amin, O. M. 1980. Helminth and arthropod parasites of some domestic animals in Wisconsin. Trans. Wis. Acad. Sci., Arts, Lett. 68: 106-110 (Publ. May, 1982).
41. Amin, O. M. 1980. Fessisentis tichiganensis sp. nov. (Acanthocephala: Fessisentidae) from Wisconsin fishes, with a key to species. J. Parasitol. 66: 1039-1045.
42. Amin, O. M. 1981. Leeches (Hirudinea) from Wisconsin, and a description of the spermatophore of Placobdella ornata. Trans. Am. Microsc. Soc. 100: 42-51.
43. Amin, O. M. 1981. On the crustacean ectoparasites of fishes from southeast Wisconsin. Trans. Am. Microsc. Soc. 100: 142-150.
44. Amin, O. M. 1981. The seasonal distribution of Echinorhynchus salmonis (Acanthocephala: Echinorhynchidae) among rainbow smelt, Osmerus mordax Mitchell, in Lake Michigan. J. Fish. Biol. 19: 467-474.
45. Amin, O. M. 1982. Acanthocephala. In Synopsis and classification of living organisms, S. P. Parker, ed. McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York, pp. 467-474.
46. Amin, O. M. and D. G. Meyer. 1982. Paracreptotrematina limi gen. et sp. nov. (Digenea: Allocreadiidae) from the mudminnow, Umbra limi. Proc. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 49: 185-188.
47. Amin, O. M. 1982. Adult trematodes (Digenea) from lake fishes of southeastern Wisconsin, with a key to species of the genus Crepidostomum Braun, 1900 in North America. Proc. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 49: 196-206.
48. Amin, O. M. 1982. Two larval trematodes (Strigeoidea) of fishes in south eastern Wisconsin. Proc. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 49: 207-213.
49. Amin, O. M. 1982. Description of larval Acanthocephalus parksedei Amin, 1975 (Acanthocephala: Echinorhynchidae) from its isopod intermediate host. Proc. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 49: 235-245.
50. Amin, O. M. 1982. The significance of pronotal comb patterns in flea-host lodging adaptations. Wiadomosci Parazytol. 28: 93-94 (in English and Polish, publ. 1983).
51. Amin, O. M. 1983. Labarotory Manual for Organismal Biology, Zoology. Univ. Wis. Parkside Press, 103p.
52. Amin, O. M. and M. E. Wagner. 1983. Further notes on the function of pronotal combs in fleas (Siphonaptera). Ann. Entomol. Soc. Am. 76: 232-234.
53. Amin, O. M. and E. H. Williams, Jr. 1983. Acanthocephalus alabamensis sp. n. (Acanthocephala: Echinorhynchidae) from Alabama fishes. J. Parasitol. 69: 764-768.
54. Amin, O. M. 1984. Camallanid and other nematode parasites of lake fishes in southeastern Wisconsin. Proc. Helminthol, Soc. Was. 51(1): 78-84.
55. Amin, O. M., F. H. Nahhas, F. Al-Yamani, and R. Abu-Hakima. 1984. On three acanthocephalan species from some Arabian Gulf fishes off the coast of Kuwait. J. Parasitol. 70: 168-170.
56. Amin, O. M. 1984. Variability and redescription of Acanthocephalus dirus (Van Cleave, 1931) Van Cleave and Townsend, 1936 (Acanthocephala: Echinorhynchidae) from freshwater fishes in North America. Proc. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 51: 225-237.
57. Amin, O. M. and D. G. Huffman. 1984. Interspecific variability in the genus Acanthocephalus (Acanthocephala: Echinorhynchidae) from North American freshwater fishes, with a key to species. Proc. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 51: 238-240.
58. Amin, O. M. 1985. Hosts and geographical distribution of Acanthocephalus (Acanthocephala: Echinorhynchidae) from North American freshwater fishes, with a discussion of species relationships. Proc. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 51: 210-220.
59. Amin, O. M. 1985. The relationship between the size of some salmonid fishes and the intensity of their acanthocephalan infections. Can. J. Zool. 63: 924-927.
60. Amin, O. M. 1985. Classification. In Biology of the Acanthocephala. D. W. T. Crompton and B. B. Nickol, eds. Cambridge Univ. Press, 27-72.
61. Amin, O. M. 1985. Acanthocephala from lake fishes in Wisconsin: Neoechinorhynchus roberbaueri n. sp. from Erimyzon sucetta (Lacepede), with a key to species of genus Neoechinorhynchus Hamann, 1892 from North American freshwater fishes. J. Parasitol. 71: 312-318.
62. Amin, O. M. 1986. Caryophyllaiedae (Cestoda) from lake fishes in Wisconsin with a description of Isoglaridacris multivitellaria sp. n. from Erimyzon sucetta (Catostomidae). Proc. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 53: 48-58.
63. Amin, O. M. 1986. Acanthocephala from lake fishes in Wisconsin: Host and seasonal distribution of species of the genus Neoechinohynchus Hamann, 1987. J. Parasitol. 72: 111-118.
64. Amin, O. M. and J. C. Vignieri, 1986. Acanthocephala from lake fishes in Wisconsin: Numerical and structural-functional relationships of the giant nuclei in Neoechinorhynchus cylindratus (Neoechinorhynchidae). J. Parasitol. 72: 88-94.
65. Amin, O. M. and J. C. Vignieri, 1986. Acanthocephala from lake fishes in Wisconsin: The giant nuclei pattern in Neoechinorhynchus robertbaueri and N. prolixoides (Neoechinorhynchidae). Proc. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 53: 184-194.
66. Amin, O. M. 1986. Acanthocephala from lake fishes in Wisconsin: Morphometric growth of Neoechinorhynchus cylindratus (Neoechinorhynchidae) and taxonomic implications. Trans. Am. Microsc. Soc. 105: 375-380.
67. Amin, O. M. 1986. On the species and populations of the genus Acanthocephalus from North American freshwater fishes: cladistic analysis. Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash. 94: 574-579.
68. Amin, O. M. 1987. Acanthocephala from lake fishes in Wisconsin: Ecology and host relationships of Pomphorhynchus bulbocolli (Pomphorhynchidae). J. Parasitol. 73 : 278-289.
69. Amin, O. M. 1987. Acanthocephala from lake fishes in Wisconsin: Morphometric growth of Pomphorhynchus bulbocolli (Pomphorhynchidae). J. Parasitol. 73: 806-810.
70. Amin, O. M. 1987. Key to families and subfamilies of Acanthocephala, with the erection of a new class (Polyacanthocephala) and a new order (Polyacanthorhyndiae). J. Parasitol. 73: 1216-1219.
71. Amin, O. M. 1988. Pathogenic micro-organisms and helminthes in sewage products, Arabian Gulf, Country of Bahrain. Am. J. Publ. Hlth. 78: 314-315.
72. Amin, O. M. 1988. Acanthocephala from lake fishes in Wisconsin: on the ecology of Leptorhynchoides thecatus (Rhadinorhynchidae). Proc. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 55: 252-255.
73. Amin, O. M. 1989. Abnormalities in some helminth parasites of fish. Trans. Am. Microsc. Soc. 108: 27-39.
74. Amin, O. M. and D. Larsen. 1989. Acanthocephala from lake fishes in Wisconsin: a biochemical profile of Neoechinorhynchus cylindratus (Neoechinorhynchidae). Trans. Am. Microsc. Soc. 108: 309-315.
75. Amin, O. M. 1989. The status of malaria in Bahrain, Arabian Gulf. J. Univ. Kuwait (Sci.). 16: 135-141.
76. Amin, O. M. 1990. (Book review). Guide to the parasites of fishes of Canada. Part III. Acanthocephala (by H. P. Arai) and Cnidaria (by M. N. Arai). Can. Spec. Publ. Fish. Aqua. Sci. 107, 95 p. J. Parasitol. 76 : 310-311.
77. Amin, O. M. 1990. Cestoda from lake fishes in Wisconsin: The ecology and pathology of Proteocephalus ambloplitis plerocercoids in their fish intermediate hosts. J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 57: 113-119.
78. Amin, O. M. and M. Cowen. 1990. Cestoda from lake fishes in Wisconsin: the ecology and pathology of Proteocephalus ambloplitis and Haplobothrium globuliformis in bass and bowfin. J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 57: 120-131.
79. Amin, O. M. 1990. Cestoda from lake fishes in Wisconsin: Occurrence of Proteocephalus in Esox and other fish species. J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 57: 132-139.
80. Amin, O. M., O. N. Bauer, and E. G. Sidorov. 1991. The description of Paralongicollum nemacheili n. gen., n. sp. (Acanthocephala: Pomphorhynchidae) from freshwater fishes in Kazakh S. S. R. J. Parasitol. 77: 26-31.
81. Amin, O. M. and H. A. Heckmann. 1991. Description of Polymorphus splindlatus n. sp. (Acanthocephala: Polymorphidae) from the heron, Nycticorax nycticorax in Peru. J. Parasitol. 77: 201-205.
82. Amin, O. M. 1991. Helminth parasites from some Tichigan lake fishes in southeast Wisconsin. J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 58: 255-260.
83. Amin, O. M. 1992. Redescription of Hebesoma violentum Van Cleave, 1928 (Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae). J. Parasitol. 78: 30-33.
84. Amin, O. M. and R. A. Heckmann. 1992. Description and pathology of Neoechinorhynchus idahoensis n. sp. (Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae) in Catostomus coumbianus from Idaho. J. Parasitol. 78: 34-39.
85. Amin, O. M. 1992. Cestoda from lake fishes in Wisconsin: The ecology and interspecific relationships of bothriocephalid cestodes in walleye, Stizostedion vitreum J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 59: 76-82.
86. Amin, O. M. and M. Gunset. 1992. The pattern of giant nuclei in Neoechinorhynhus rutili (Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae). Trans. Am. Microsc. Soc. 111: 65-69.
87. Amin, O. M. and M. A. Boraini. 1992. Cestoda from lake fishes in Wisconsin: The morphological identity of Proteocephalus ambloplitis. Trans. Am. Microsc. Soc. 111: 193-198.
88. Amin, O. M., F. H. Whitaker, K. M. Klueber, and J. Hoffpauir. 1993. Ultrastructural changes in the body wall of Neoechinorhynchus cylindratus(Acanthocephala) associated with reproductive activity. Trans. Am. Microsc. Soc. 112: 208-216.
89. Jun, L., L. Shang-Jun. O. M. Amin, and Z. Yumei. 1993. Blood-feeding of the gerbil flea Nosopsyllus laeviceps kuzenkovi (Yagubyants) vector of plague in Inner Mongolia, China. Med. Vet. Entomol. 7: 54-58.
90. Amin, O. M., L. Jun, L. Shangjun, Z. Yumei, and S. Lianzhi. 1993. Development and longevity of Nosopsyllus laeviceps kuzenkovi (Siphonaptera) from Inner Mongolia under laboratory conditions. J. Parasitol. 79: 193-197.
91. Amin, O. M., C. A. Dickey, and A. R. Spallato. 1993. The impact of chemical rehabilitation on the parasitic fauna of fish in a Wisconsin lake. Trans. Wis. Acad. Sci, Arts, Lett. 81:1-5.
92. Amin, O. M. 1992. Review of the genus Polymorphus Luhe, 1911 (Acanthocephala: Polymorphidae), with the synonymization of Hexaglandula Petrochenko, 1950 and Subcorynosoma Hoklova, 1967, and a key to the species. Qatar Univ. Sci. J. 12:115-123 (publ. 1993).
93. Amin, O. M. and F. M. Nahhas. 1994. Acanthocephala of marine fishes, with descriptions of Filisoma longcementglandatus n. sp., Neorhadinorhynchus macrospinosus n. sp. (Cavisomidae), and gravid females of Rhadinorhynchus johnstoni (Rhadinorhynchidae); with keys to species of the genera Filisoma and Neorhadinorhynchus. J. Parasitol. 80: 768-774.
94. Amin, O. M., C. l. Kramer, and S. J. Upton. 1995. Macracanthorhynchus ingens (Acanthocephala: Oligacanthorhynchidae) from a dog, Canis familiaris, In Kansas. Texas J. Sci.
95. Amin, O. M. and B. S. Dezfuli. 1995. Taxonomic notes on Polyacanthorhynchus kenyensis (Acanthocephala: Polyacanthorhynchidae) from Lake Naivasha, Kenya. J. Parasitol. 81: 69-76.
96. Amin, O. M., R. A. Heckmann, R. Mesa, and E. Mesa. 1994. Description and host relationships of cystacanths of Polymorphus spindlatus (Acanthocephala: Polymorphidae) from their paratenic fish hosts in Peru. J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 62: 249-253.
97. Amin, O. M. 1994. Relationships in Parasitology. Explore Part I. 5: 5-8.
98. Amin, O. M. 1995. Relationships in Parasitology. Part II. 6:19-22.
99. Amin, O. M., C. L. Kramer and S. J. Upton. 1995. First report of the acanthocephalan Macracanthocephalus ingens from the domestic dog Canis familiaris in Kansas. Texas J. Sci. 47: 69-72.
100. Amin, O. M. and M. D. Dailey. 1996. Redescription of Dollfusentis heteracanthus (Acanthocephala: Illiosentidae) from bonefish, Albula vulpes, in the West Indies. J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 63: 31-34.
101. Amin, O. M. and O. Sey. 1996. Acanthocephala from Arabian Gulf fishes off Kuwait, with descriptions of Neoechinorhynchus dimorphospinus sp. n. (Neoechinorhynchidae), Tegorhynchus holospinus sp. n. (Illiosentidae), Micraacanthorhynchina kuwaitensis sp. n. (Rhadinorhynchidae), and Slendrorhynchus breviclaviproboscis gen. n., sp. n. (Diplosentidae); and key to species of the genus Micracanthorhynchina. J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 63: 201-210.
102. Amin, O. M., R. A. Heckmann, V. Inchausty and R. Vasquez. 1996. Immature Polyacanthorhynchus rhopalorhynchus (Acanthocephala: Polyacanthorhynchidae) in venton, Hoplias malabaricus (Pisces) from Moca Vie River, Bolivia, with notes on its apical organ and histopathology. J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 63: 115-119.
103. Amin, O. M. and R. M. Pitts. 1996. Moniliformis clarki (Acanthocephala: Moniliformidae) from the pocket gopher, Geomys bursarius missouriensis, in Missouri. J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 63: 144-145.
104. Amin, O. M. and W. L. Minckley. 1996. Parasites of some fish introduced into an Arizona Reservoir, with notes on introductions. J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 63: 193-200.
105. Amin, O. M. 1996. Parasite infections of humans, diagnosis and pathology. A 5-part video tape series. Center Improv. Human Funct., Intern. Wichita, KS.
106. Amin, O. M. 1996. Facial cutaneous dermatitis associated with arthropod presence. Explore 7: 62-64.
107. Amin, O. M. and A. Canaris. 1997. Description of Neolacunisoma geraldschmidti gen. n., sp. n., (Acanthocephala: Centrorhynchidae) from South African Shorebirds. J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 64: 275-280.
108. Amin, O. M. 1997. Prevalence and host relationships of intestinal protozoan infections during the summer of 1996. Explore 8: 29-34.
109. Amin, O. M. and M. Dailey. 1998. Description of Mediorhynchus papillosus (Acanthocephala: Gigantorhynchidae) from a Colorado, USA, population, with a discussion of morphology and geographical variability. J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 65: 189-200.
110. Amin, O. M. and W. L. Bullock. 1998. Neoechinorhynchus rostratum sp. n. (Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae) from the eel, Anguilla rostrata, in estuarine waters of northeastern North America. J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 65: 169-173.
111. Amin, O. M. and K. O. Amin 1998. Herbal Remedies for parasitic infections. Explore 8: 1-59.
112. Amin, O. M. 1998. Marine Flora and Fauna of the Eastern United States: Acanthocephala. NOAA Tech. Rep. NMFS, U. S. Dept. Comm. 28pp.
113. Amin, O. M. 1998. Seasonal prevalence and host relationships of Cyclospora cayetanensis in North America during 1996. Parasitol. Intern. 47: 53-58.
114. Amin, O. M. and L. Margolis. 1998. Redescription of Bolbosoma capitatum (Acanthocephala: Polymorphidae) from false killer whale off Vancouver Island, with taxonomic reconsideration of the species and a synonymy of B. physeteris. J. Helminthol Soc. Wash. 65: 179-188.
115. Amin, O. M., C. Wongsawad, T. Marayong, P. Saehoong, S. Suwattanacoupt and O. Sey. 1998. Spaerechinorhynchus macropisthospinus sp. n. (Acanthocephala: Plagiorhynchidae) from lizards, frogs, and fish in Thailand. J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 65: 174-178.
116. Amin, O. M. 1999. Understanding parasites. Explore 9: 11-13.
117. Amin, O. M. 1999. Detecting microbes. In Optimal Digestion, T. W. Nickols and N. Faass, eds. Avon Books, Inc. N. Y. 145-152.
118. Amin, O. M. and S. S. Hendrix. 1999. Acanthocephala of cichlids (Pisces) in Lake Malawi, Africa, with a description of Acanthogyrus (Acanthosentis) malwawiensis sp. n. (Quadrigyridae) from Labeo cylindricus Peters, 1852 (Cyprindae). J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 66: 47-55.
119. Amin, O. M., A. G. Canaris and M. Kinsella. 1999. A taxonomic reconsideration of the genus Plagiorhynchus s. lat. (Acanthocephala: Plagiorhynchidae), with descriptions of South African Plagiorhynchus (Prosthorhynchus) cylindratus from shore birds and P. (P.). malayensis, and a key to the species of the subgenus Prosthorhynchus. J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 66: 123-132.
120. Amin, O. M. 2000. Evaluation of a new system for the fixation, concentration, and staining of intestinal parasites in fecal specimens, with critical observations on the trichrome stain. J. Microbiol. Meth. 39: 127-132.
121. Amin, O. M., W. S. Eidelman, W. Domke, J. Bailey and G. Pfeifer. 2000. An unusual case of anisakiasis in California, U. S. A. Comp. Parasitol. 67: 71-75.
122. Amin, O. M., R. A. Heckmann, N. V. Ha, P. V. Luc and P. N. Doanh. 2000. Revision of the genus Pallisentis (Acanthocephala: Quadrigyridae) with the erection of three new subgenera, the description of Pallisentis (Brevitritospinus) vietnamensis subgen. et. sp. n., a key to species of Pallisentis, and the description of a new quadrigyrid genus, Pararaosentis gen. n. Comp. Parasitol. 67: 40-50
123. Amin, O. M. 2000. Acanthocephala in the Neotropical region. In Matazoan parasites in the neotropics. A systematic and ecological perspective, G. Salgado-Maldonado, A. N. G. Aldrete and V. M. Vidal-Martinez, eds. Inst. Biol., UNAM, Mexico, 167-174.
124. Amin, O. M., R. S. S. Al Sady, F. T. Mhaisen and S. F. Bassat. 2001. Neoechinorhynchus iraqensis sp. n. (Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae) from the freshwater mullet, Liza abu (Heckel), in Iraq. Comp. Parasitol. 68: 108-111.
125. Amin, O. M. 2001. Neuro-cutaneous Syndrome (NCS): a new disorder. Explore 10: 55-56.
126. Amin, O. M. 2001. Neoechinorhynchus didelphis sp. n. (Acanthocephala: Neoechinrohynchidae) from the redfin pickerel, Esox americanus, in Georgia, U. S. A. Comp. Parasitol. 68: 103-107.
127. Amin, O. M. 2002. Seasonal prevalence of intestinal parasites in the United States during 2000. Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. 66: 799-803.
128. Amin, O. M., M. F. A. Saoud and K. S. R. Alkuwari. 2002. Neoechinorhynchus qatarensis sp. n. (Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae) from the blue-barred flame parrot fish, Scarus ghobban Forsskal, 1775, in Qatari waters of the Arabian Gulf. Parasitol. Intern. 51: 171-176.
129. Amin, O. M. 2002. Revision of Neoechinorhynchus Stiles and Hassall, 1905 (Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae) with keys to 88 species in two subgenera. Syst. Parasitol. 53; 1-18.
130. Amin, O. M., S. M. A. Abdullah and F. T. Mhaisen. 2003. Description of Pomphorhynchus spindletruncatus sp. n. (Acanthocephala: Pomphorhynchidae) from freshwater fishes in northern Iraq, with the erection of a new Pomphorhynchid genus, Pyriproboscis gen. n., and keys to genera of Pomphorhynchidae and species of Pomphorhynchus. Syst. Parasitol. 54:229-235.
131. Amin, O. M. and H. Taraschewski. 2003. Description of subadult Pallisentis (Pallisentis) rexus (Acanthocephala: Quadrigyridae) from the vertebrate intermediate host in Thailand with an examination of the species identity. Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash. 116: 215-221 .
132. Amin, O. M. 2003. Evaluation of Trichrome-PLUS stain, a new permanent
stain and procedure for intestinal parasites in fecal specimens. Explore 12: 4-9.
133. Amin, O. M. 2003. Ancient Egyptian medicine. Explore 12: 7-15.
134. Amin, O. M. 2003. On the diagnosis and management of neurocutaneous
syndrome (NCS), a toxicity disorder from dental sealants. Explore 12: 1-5.
135. Amin, O. M., S..M. A. Abdullah and F. T. Mhaisen. 2003. Neoechinorhynchu (Neoechinorhynchus) zabensis sp. n.(Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae) from freshwater fish in northern Iraq. Folia Parasitol. 50: 293-297.
136. Amin, O. M. 2004. Toxicity from dental sealants causing neurocutaneous syndrome (NCS), a dermatological and neurological disorder. J. Holist. Dent. Assoc. 2004: 1-15.
137. Amin, O. M., R. A. Heckmann and N. V. Ha. 2004. On the immature stages of Pallisentis (Pallisentis) celatus (Acanthocephala: Quadrigyridae) from occasional hosts in Vietnam.
138. Amin, O. M., K. Nagasawa and M. J. Grygier. 2004. Seasonal and host distribution of fish acanthocephalans from the Lake Biwa Basin, Japan.
139. Amin, O. M. 2004. Occurrence of the subgenus Acanthosentis Verma & Datta,1929 (Acanthocephala; Quadrigyridae) in Japan, with the description of Acanthogyrus (Acanthosentis) alternatspinus sp. n. and A. (A.) parareceptaclis sp.n. from Lake Biwa drainage fishes and a key species of the subgenus. Syst.Parasitol. 60: 125-137.
140. Amin, O. M. 2004. On the course of neurocutaneous syndrome (NCS) and its pseudo-diagnosis by medical professionals. Explore 13: 4-9.
141. Amin, O. M. 2004. On the diagnosis and management of neurocutaneous syndrome, a toxicity disorder from dental sealants. CA Dent. Assoc. J. 32: 657-663.
142. Amin, O. M., R. A. Heckmann and N. V. Ha. 2004. On the immature stages of Pallisentis (Pallisentis) celatus (Acanthocephala: Quadrigyridae) from occasional Fish hosts in Vietnam. Raffles Bull. Zool. 52: 593-598.
143. Amin, O. M. 2005. Detecting microbes. In Optimal Digestive Health, T. W. Nichols & N. Faass, Eds., Healing Arts Press, Rochester, Vemont. 130-137.
144. Amin, O. M. 2005. Trends in annual, seasonal, geographical and host distribution, and symptomology of Blastocystis hominis infections in the United States. Explore 14: 11-19.
145. Amin, O. M. and K. W. Christison. 2005. Neoechinorhynchus (Neoechinorhynchus) dorsovaginatus n. sp. (Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae) from the dusky kob Agyrosomus japonicus (Sciaenidae) on the southern coast of South Africa. Syst. Parasitol. 61: 173-179.
146. Amin, O. M. 2005. Dental products causing Neuro-cutaneous Syndrome (NCS) symptoms in NCS patients. Explore 14: 57-64.
147. Amin, O. M. 2005. The epidemiology of Blastocystis hominis in the United States. Res. J. Parasitol. 1: 1-11
148. Amin, O. M. 2006. An overview of Neuro-Cutaneous Syndrome (NCS) with a special reference to symptomology. Explore 15: 41-49.
149. Amin, O. M. 2006. On the diagnosis and management of Neurocutaneous Syndrome (NCS), a toxicity desorder from dental sealants.Townsend Letter # 276: 85-90.
150. Amin, O. M. 2006. Prevalence, distribution and host relationships of Cryptosporidium parvum (Protozoa), infections in the United States, 2003-2005. Explore, in press.
151. Amin, O. M., R. Heckmann and M. D. Standing. 2007. The structural-functional relationship of the para-receptacle structure in Acanthocephala. Comp. Parasitol., in press.
152. Heckmann, R., O. M. Amin and M. D. Standing. 2007. Chemical analysis of metals in acanthocephalans utilizing Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDXA) in conjunction with scanning electron microscope (SEM). Comp. Parasitol., in press.
153. Amin, O. M., N. V. Ha and R. Heckmann. 2007. New and already known acanthocephalans from amphibians, reptiles and mammals in Vietnam, with descriptions of two new genera and four new species and keys to species of Pseudoacanthocephalus Petrochenko, 1956 (Echinorhynchidae) and Sphaerechinorhynchus Johnston & Deland, 1929 (Plagiorhynchidae). Syst Parasitol., in press.
154. Amin, O. M., J. Blais, C. V. Oosterhout and J. Cable. 2007. On Acanthogyrus (Acanthosentis) tilapiae (Acanthocephala: Quadrigyridae) from cichlids (Pisces) in Lake Malawi, Africa. Comp. Parasitol., subm.
155. Amin, O. M. 2007. On the the epidemiology of Cryptosporidium parvun (Protozoa) infections in the United States. Res. J. Parasitol., subm.
156. Amin, O. M., N. V. Ha and R. Heckmann. 2007. On five new species of acanthocephala from birds in Vietnam including Pyrirhynchus heterospinus n. gen., n. sp. (Paraheteracnthocephalidae n. fam.) from sand piper, Tringa hypoleucos. Syst. Parasitol., in preparation.

April 2, 2012

Aspartame Side Effects

Posted in ASPARTAME, CANCER, SYMPTOMS tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 12:20 am by PCOSLady


Aspartame Side Effects
My brother just made me aware of what “aspartame” caused in him… He went off his Diabetic meds and drinking or eating anything with aspartame in it this last month…. His recent blood tests showed he was not Diabetic!
~ Sure makes you want to rethink what you eat & drink, eh?

Aspartame Side Effects
From 10,000 consumer complaints the FDA compiled a list of 92 Symptoms reported from aspartame use, including death.
FDA list of 92 aspartame-related symptoms:

~ Abdominal Pain
~ Anxiety Attacks
~ Arthritis, Asthma
~ Asthmatic Reactions
~ Bloating
~ Edema (Fluid Retention)
~ Blood Sugar Control Problems (Hypoglycemia or Hyperglycemia)
~ Brain Cancer (Pre-approval studies in animals)
~ Breathing Difficulties
~ Burning Eyes or Throat
~ Burning Urination
~ Can’t Think Straight
~ Chest Pains
~ Chronic Cough
~ Chronic Fatigue
~ Confusion
~ Death
~ Depression
~ Diarrhea
~ Dizziness
~ Excessive Thirst or Hunger
~ Fatigue
~ Feel Unreal
~ Flushing of Face
~ Hair Loss (Baldness) or Thinning of Hair
~ Headaches/Migraines
~ Hearing Loss
~ Heart Palpitations
~ Hives (Urticaria)
~ Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)
~ Impotency and Sexual Problems
~ Inability to Concentrate
~ Infection Susceptibility
~ Insomnia
~ Irritability
~ Itching
~ Joint Pains
~ Laryngitis
~ “Like Thinking in a Fog”
~ Marked Personality Changes
~ Memory loss
~ Menstrual Problems or Changes
~ Migraines and Severe Headaches (Trigger or Cause From Chronic Intake)
~ Muscle spasms, Nausea or Vomiting, Numbness or Tingling of Extremities
~ Other Allergic-Like Reactions
~ Panic Attacks
~ Phobias
~ Poor Memory
~ Rapid Heart Beat
~ Rashes
~ Seizures and Convulsions
~ Slurring of Speech
~ Swallowing Pain
~ Tachycardia
~ Tremors
~ Tinnitus
~ Vertigo
~ Vision Loss
~ Weight Gain
Aspartame Disease/Toxicity Mimics Symptoms or Worsens the Following Diseases:

~ Fibromyalgia
~ Arthritis
~ Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
~ Parkinson’s Disease
~ Lupus
~ Multiple Chemical Sensitivities (MCS)
~ Diabetes and Diabetic Complications
~ Epilepsy
~ Alzheimer’s Disease
~ Birth Defects
~ Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
~ Lymphoma
~ Lyme Disease
~ Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD)
~ Panic Disorder
~ Depression and other Psychological Disorders

Aspartame and Diabetes – Is it a bad combination?
So what is the concern over aspartame and diabetes? The American Diabetes Association (ADA) is recommending and accepts the FDA’s conclusion that the consumption of Aspartame is safe and can be part of a healthy diet.
Despite the research that is sounding the alarm all over the country and all over the world and despite the fact that an entire state, New Mexico, is trying to ban Aspartame, this dangerous substance is still being considered a “part of a healthy diet.” YIKES!
Are you looking for an alternative to aspartame? Try xylitol sweetener or stevia sweetener. And if you think you aspartame has effected your health you may want to consider an aspartame detox!
Stevia has many helpful properties.
It has:
~ No sugar and no calories.
~ Anti-inflammatory effects.
~ Is 100 percent naturally derived.
~ 250 to 300 times the sweetness of sugar.
~ Heat stability to 200 degrees Celsius (392 degrees Fahrenheit).
~ No fermentation properties.
~ Flavor-enhancing qualities.
~ Plaque-retardant and Anti-caries properties to help prevent cavities.
~ Been recommended for diabetics because it does not spike insulin.
~ Anti-bacterial, anti-viral and anti-fungal properties.
~ Been shown to lower blood pressure in those with hypertension.
Over 100 phytochemicals have been discovered in Stevia, and it is rich in terpenes and flavonoids. Besides having been in use for hundreds of years, extensive testing in animals has demonstrated no harmful effects. Its main sweet chemical, stevioside, has been found to be nontoxic in acute toxicity studies with rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, and birds. It also has been shown that it does not cause cellular changes nor affect fertility. The natural stevia leaf also has been found to be nontoxic and has no mutagenic activity.
Stevia can be used in cooking and as a tabletop sweetener.


~ Healthy Holistic Living… Aspartame and Diabetes – Is it a bad combination?
~ Dr. Mercola on aspartame and its dangers in his articles…
“Sweet Misery: A Poisoned world”
~ Dr Mercola … Aspartame, FDA approved biomedical genocide is revealed…
aspartame the silent killer
aspartame side effects
aspartame poisoning
aspartame and pregnancy
aspartame and diabetes
aspartame etc…
Sweet Misery: A Poisoned world

March 28, 2012

IBS – Segment Findings

Posted in IBS, RESEARCH tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 8:57 pm by PCOSLady

IBS – Segment Findings
PCOS Lady: I found this researching PCOS and the lymphatic system…
* IBS is caused by parasites as well…
~ gas (often painful) ~ *parasites
~ bloating (indigestion) ~ *parasites
~ acid reflux ~ *parasites
~ burning mouth or throat ~ *parasites
~ mouth blisters, cramps
~ abdominal pain (especially after eating or drinking) ~ *parasites
~ constipation and/or diarrhea (or alternating) ~ *parasites
~ mucus in the stool ~ *parasites
~ liquid seepage from the rectum ~ *parasites
~ heartburn ~ *parasites
* 9 of 10 symptoms are caused by parasites!
~ Most doctors are not trained to diagnose, handle or treat parasite infections…
~ Quest Diagnostics and Lab Corp only check for the most common type(s) of parasites!
~ checks for every parasite known in the world!
Man-made chemicals: the hidden role of the lymphatic system in the genesis of polycystic ovary, fibrocystic breast disease, and breast cancer.(Quantum Medicine Update)
IBS – Findings
While it is well known that carcinogens fuel carcinogenesis, research is scanty on the mechanisms underlying why and how PIPs are stored in the lymphatic and breast tissue and fail to be properly detoxified and excreted by the majority of today’s detoxification protocols.
In the October 1994 Townsend Letter, I stated: “The wellspring of the immunologic defense is the lymphatic system.” 33 In the 2001 issue, I started: “We have discovered that a high percentage of IBS sufferers have duodenitis, dysbiosis, stagnant lymph flow, and drainage in the deep lymph channels of the gut. …
Read the full article at the site…
New Breakthroughs in Treating Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Townsend Letter June 1, 2001 by Yanick Jr., Paul
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is estimated to affect 1520% of adults. Also known as leaky gut syndrome, some IBS sufferers have constipation (difficult or infrequent bowel movements); others have diarrhea (frequent loose stools, often with an urgent need to have bowel movements); and some people experience both.
Although mainstream doctors call IBS a functional disorder, it is only because they are unable to detect any sign of disease when the colon is examined in isolation from other organs and systems of the body. IBS causes a great deal of pain, discomfort and distress, and may cause damage to the intestines and liver, and interfere with or even block nutrient uptake causing chronic malnutrition.
Read the whole article at site:
~ New Breakthroughs in Treating Irritable Bowel Syndrome.
~ ** Dr Mercola & Dr Richie Shoemaker, MD … Effective Strategies to Identify and Correct the Inflammation Caused by Mold Exposure… They cover mold, algae, spirochetes, etc… causing asthma, MS, Fibromyalgia and more that upset our metabolism, etc.. causing inflammation in us… Taking drugs does no good unless directed at the causes… The video explains it all! Well worth telling your doctors about!
Irritable Bowel Syndrome & Highly Sensitive … – The Captains Lady
~ The Captain’s Lady … Natural remedies for Highly Sensitive People experiencing Irritable Bowel Syndrome… Informative information for you on other topics…
irritable bowel syndrome
functional disorder
leaky gut syndrome
chronic malnutrition
parasites in humans
IBS parasites

March 20, 2012

Celiac Disease Symptoms (PCOS plus?)

Posted in CELIAC DISEASE, GLUTEN SENSITIVITY, PCOS, SYMPTOMS tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 2:44 am by PCOSLady


I saw this list and felt it was important to post it here… The symptoms are vast overlapping PCOS and many other conditions…. Maybe you have this too and it’s not being addressed… It may answer the “WHY” your body does not respond to everything you try… April 2012 my DO told me 1 in 25 people have it and do not know it! His niece was just diagnosed having Celiac…
~ The View’s Elisabeth Hasselbeck has Celiac Disease and is Gluten Sensitive…
~ Celiac will prevent you from getting pregnant
~ Gluten Sensitivity starves you inside
~ Gluten allergic has you hungry still after eating because the nutrients pass through your body…
~ Her book: Deliciously G-Free Flavorful Believe Gluten-Free…
It takes a blood test or a mouth swab sample…
Symptom Guide
Could My Symptoms Be Related to Celiac Disease or Gluten Sensitivity?
This is a common question people ask in the face of a bewildering array
of possible celiac disease and gluten sensitivity symptoms. The Gluten Free Works Celiac Disease Symptom Guide will help you identify possible symptoms and health problems that you can present to your doctor.
Here is the list of over 300 Signs, Symptoms, Associated Disorders and Complications directly or indirectly resulting from celiac disease and gluten sensitivity.
We were the first to present this information in our comprehensive celiac disease reference, “Recognizing Celiac Disease.” This list is now being used by celiac disease centers, national celiac organizations and health organizations worldwide.
Blood System Symptoms
Abnormal levels of blood components and quality of blood cells and plasma, detected by blood studies ordered by a doctor…
~ Anemia, Folic acid
~ Anemia, Iron
~ Anemia, Vitamin B12
~ Anti-Endomysium Antibodies (EMA)
~ Anti-Gliadin Antibodies (AGA)
~ Anti-Tissue Transglutaminase Antibodies (tTG)
~ Associated Autoimmune Antibodies
~ Bone Alkaline Phosphatase Enzyme, Elevated
~ Calcium, Low
~ Cholesterol, Low (below 156)
~ Coagulation Factors, Low
~ Copper, Low
~ Hemochromatosis
~ Glucose, Low or elevated
~ Homocysteine, Elevated
~ Hyperprolactinemia (elevated prolactin hormone)
~ Hypoprothrombinemia
~ Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura
~ Liver Enzymes, Elevated
~ Macroamylasemia
~ Macrocytosis
~ Macrolipasemia
~ Magnesium, Low
~ Neutropenia
~ Phosphorus, Low
~ Plasma Proteins, Low
~ Potassium, Low
~ Prolonged Prothrombin Time
~ Transient Erythroblastopenia
~ Zinc, Low
Body Composition Symptoms
Disorders of the body as a whole…
~ Anorexia (Poor appetite)
~ Appetite, Increased
~ Cachexia (Wasting of the body)
~ Loss of Vitality
~ Obesity
~ Weight Gain, Unexplained
~ Weight Loss, Unexplained
Cardiovascular System Symptoms
Disorders of the heart and blood vessels…
~ Angina Pectoris
~ Aortic Vasculitis
~ Atherosclerosis
~ Cardiomegaly
~ Coronary Artery Disease
~ Easy Bruising (Ecchymosis)
~ Hypertension
~ Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy
~ Nosebleeds, Unexplained
Digestive System Symptoms
The following symptoms in this section may be present alone or in any combination in celiac disease. They result from inflammation, damage,and interference with normal function caused by gluten exposure in the digestive tract itself and/or nutritional deficiencies. As you see, problems can develop not only in the small intestine where inflammation can be intense, but also in other areas such as mucosal tissues of the mouth, esophagus, stomach and colon.
~ Abdominal Distention (Bloating)
~ Abdominal Pain
~ Adenocarcinoma of the Small Intestine
~ Aphthous Ulcers (Canker sores in mouth)
~ Autoimmune Cholangitis
~ Beta Casein Enteropathy (Cow’s dairy intolerance similar to celiac disease)
~ Bleeding, Unexplained
~ Cancer of the Esophagus
~ Cancer of the Pharynx
~ Candida Infections
~ Carbohydrate Malabsorption
~ Cheilosis (Red lips, cracking/ oozing at corners of mouth)
~ Colitis, Collagenous
~ Colitis, Lymphocytic
~ Colitis, Ulcerative
~ Colonic Volvulus (Loop of intestine twists causing strangulation of intestine)
~ Constipation
~ Constipation Alternating with Diarrhea
~ Crohn’s Disease
~ Defective Tooth Enamel (Yellow, white spots, missing enamel)
~ Delayed Gastric Emptying (Early fullness after eating)
~ Diarrhea, acute (Also called celiac crisis)
~ Diarrhea, chronic
~ Duodenal Erosions in the Second Part of Duodenum (Small ulcers)
~ Dysphagia (Difficulty swallowing)
~ Edema of Small Intestinal Lining
~ Esophageal Small Cell Cancer
~ Esophageal Motor Abnormalities (Poor muscle activity/coordination)
~ Gas
~ Gastric Ulcer (Stomach ulcers)
~ Gastric Ulcerations
~ Gastritis, Collagenous
~ Gastritis, Lymphocytic
~ Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)
~ Gastro-Intestinal Occult Bleeding (Blood in stool that is not visible to naked eye)
~ Gluten Sensitive Enteritis
~ Gums bleeding/ swollen (Purplish in adults/ red in children)
~ Heartburn
~ H. Pylori Bacter (Infection of the stomach)
~ Impaired Gall Bladder Motility
~ Irritable Bowel Syndrome
~ Jejunitis, chronic
~ Lactose Intolerance (Gas, bloating, loose stools from milk)
~ Laryngospasm
~ Leaky Gut Syndrome
~ Lymphoma
~ Malabsorption of Nutrients
~ Maltose Intolerance (Gas, bloating, loose stools from maltose, a simple carbohydrate)
~ Nausea
~ Oral Mucosal Lesions (Mouth lesions)
~ Plummer-Vinson Syndrome
~ Post-cricoid Cancer
~ Primary Biliary Cirrhosis (Bile backs up in liver)
~ Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis (Scarring of bile ducts in liver)
~ Small Bowel Intussusception (One loop of intestine slips into another)
~ Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth
~ Steatorrhea (Pale, smelly, floating stool hard to flush or sticks to toilet)
~ Sucrose Intolerance (Gas, bloating, mucous in stool from sugar)
~ Tongue (Beefy, red, smooth, burning)
~ Tongue (Fiery red, smooth, swollen, sore)
~ Tongue (Magenta, swollen)
~ Tongue (Pale, smooth, burning)
~ Vomiting
Glandular System Symptoms
Disorders of the glands…
~ Addison’s Disease (Adrenal gland failure)
~ Autoimmune Hepatitis
~ Autoimmune Thyroiditis (Hypothyroidism)
~ Diabetes Mellitus Type I
~ Diabetic Instability
~ Gastro-Intestinal Complications of Type 1 Diabetes
~ Grave’s Disease (Hyperthyroidism)
~ Hepatic Granulomatous Disease
~ Idiopathic Hypoparathyroidism
~ Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
~ Pancreatic Insufficiency
~ Parathyroid Carcinoma
~ Primary Hyperparathyroidism
~ Secondary Hypoparathyroidism
Immune System Symptoms
Disorders of antibody production…
~ Allergic Rhinitis
~ Antiphospholipid Syndrome
~ Asthma
~ Autoimmune Disorders in Celiac Disease
~ Autoimmune Disorders in Dermatitis Herpetiformis
~ Autoimmune Polyglandular Syndromes
~ Common Variable Immunodeficiency
~ Food Allergies, IgE and non-IgE Immune Responses
~ IgA Deficiency
~ Sarcoidosis
~ Sjögrens Syndrome
~ Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
~ Urticaria, chronic (Hives)
Integumentary System Symptoms
Disorders of skin, hair, and nails…
~ Alopecia Areata (Patches of hair loss)
~ Alopecia, Diffuse (Balding)
~ Cutaneous Vasculitis
~ Cutis Laxa
~ Dermatitis Herpetiformis
~ Dermatomyositis
~ Eczema
~ Edema (Swelling)
~ Eythema Elevatum Diutinum
~ Erythema Nodosum
~ Follicular Hyperkeratosis (Dry rough skin/ plugged hair follicles on body)
~ Ichthyosis, Acquired
~ Itchy Skin Rash
~ Hangnail
~ Koilonychia (Thin nails that flatten, ends progressively turning up instead of down)
~ Melanoma
~ Nails, Dry and brittle that chip, peel, crack or break easily
~ Nails with Horizontal and Vertical Ridges/Fragile
~ Nail with Rounded and Curved Down Ends, Dark, Dry
~ Nails with White Spots
~ Nails with Splinter Hemorrhages
~ Pityriasis Rubra Pilaris
~ Prurigo Nodularis (Hyde’s Prurigo)
~ Psoriasis
~ Scleroderma
~ Seborrhea
~ Thin hair
~ Vitiligo
Lymphatic System Symptoms
Disorders of the lymphocytes (white blood cells), lymph nodes and spleen…
~ B-cell non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma
~ Cryptic Intestinal T-cell Lymphoma (Refractory Sprue)
~ Enteropathy Associated T-cell Lymphoma (EATL)
~ Extraintestinal Lymphomas
~ Intraepithelial Lymphocytosis in Small Bowel Samples
~ Lymphadenopathy
~ Mesenteric Lymph Node Cavitation
~ Hyposplenism (Atrophy of spleen)
Muscular System Symptoms
Disorders of muscle structure and function…
~ Hypokalemic Rhabdomyolysis (Acute, severe potassium deficiency)
~ Muscle Pain and Tenderness
~ Muscle Spasm and Cramps
~ Muscle Wasting
~ Muscle Weakness
~ Osteomalacic Myopathy
~ Polymyositis
~ Tetany
Nervous System Symptoms
Disorders of nerves, brain and spinal cord structure and function…
~ Anxiety
~ Apathy
~ Ataxia, Gait Disturbance
~ Ataxia, Gluten
~ Ataxia, Progressive Myoclonic
~ Brain Atrophy
~ Cerebral Perfusion Abnormalities (Poor blood flow)
~ Chonic Fatigue Syndrome
~ Chorea
~ Cortical Calcifying Angiomatosis
~ Dementia
~ Depression
~ Epilepsy
~ Fatigue/ Lassitude
~ Headache
~ Inability to Concentrate
~ Insomnia
~ Irritability
~ Migraine
~ Multiple Sclerosis
~ Nervous System Disorders
~ Peripheral Neuropathy
~ Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy
~ Schizophrenic Spectrum Disorders
~ Tremors
~ Vasculitis of the Central Nervous System
Pulmonary System Symptoms
Disorders of lung tissue and broncheal tree structure and function…

~ Bronchiectasis
~ Bronchial Pneumonia
~ Idiopathic Pulmonary Hemosiderosis
~ Increased Pulmonary Permeability
~ Increased Susceptibility to Tuberculosis
~ Lung Cavities or Abcess
~ Non-Response to Tuberculosis Treatment
~ Pneumococcal Septicemia
Sensory System Symptoms
Disorders of sense organ structure and function…
~ Bitot’s Spots (Foamy patches on whites of eye)
~ Blepharitis
~ Bloodshot Eyes
~ Blurred Vision
~ Cataracts
~ Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca
~ Keratomalacia
~ Nightblindness
~ Ocular Myopathy
~ Smell, Loss of
~ Taste, Loss of
~ Uveitis, Bilateral
~ Xerophthalmia
Skeletal System Symptoms
Disorders of bone, joints and teeth…
~ Bone Fracture
~ Bone Pain
~ Enteropathic Arthritis
~ Osteitis Fibrosa
~ Osteomalacia
~ Osteonecrosis
~ Osteoporosis
~ Psoriatic Arthritis
~ Recurrent Monoarthritis
Urinary System Symptoms
Disorders of kidneys and urinary tract structure and function…
~ Hypocalciuria
~ IgA Nephropathy
~ Kidney Stones
~ Urinary Tract Infection
Reproductive System Symptoms in Females
Disorders of organ structure and function…
~ Amenorrhea (Absence of menstrual period)
~ Early Menopause
~ Infertility
~ Late Menarche (Late start of menstrual periods)
~ Premenstrual Syndrome
~ Dysmenorrhea (Painful menstrual periods)
~ Dyspareunia (Painful intercourse)
~ Vaginitis
Reproductive System Symptoms in Males
Disorders of organ structure and function…
~ Hypogonadism
~ Impotence
~ Infertility
~ Sperm Abnormalities
Reproduction: Pregnancy, Labor & Delivery and Puerperium Symptoms
Disorders of childbearing…
~ Severe Iron Deficiency Anemia in Pregnancy
~ Short Duration of Breast Feeding
~ Miscarriage
~ Complications During Pregnancy, Labor and Delivery
~ Complications After Childbirth
Zygote Development Symptoms
Disorders of chromosomes…
~ Down Syndrome
~ Turner’s Syndrome
Fetus Development Symptoms
Disorders of that occur before birth of the child…

~ Congenital Anomalies
~ Intrauterine Growth Retardation
~ Cystic Fibrosis
~ Spina Bifida
Child Development Symptoms

Disorders of children that occur after birth…

~ Autism and Learning Disorders
~ Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD)
~ Cancer Predisposition in Children
~ Chronic Bullous Dermatosis
~ Delayed Puberty in Boys
~ Delayed Puberty in Girls
~ Dermatitis Herpetiformis
~ Developmental Delay
~ Failure to Thrive and Growth Retardation
~ Fecal Occult Blood (Blood found in stool that is not visible to the naked eye)
~ Glycogenic Acanthosis
~ Hypotonia
~ Juvenile Autoimmune Thyroid Disease
~ Juvenile Diabetes Type 1
~ Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis
~ Abnormal Blood Studies
~ Latent Anemia in Enzymopathies of Small Intestine (Lack of enzymes produced by villi)
~ Penicilllin V Impaired Absorption
~ Refractory Anemia (Unresponsive to iron therapy)
~ Osteopenia
~ Rickets
~ Short Stature
~ Stroke in Childhood
Here are some other ways to look at various symptoms :
Behavioral Symptoms
~ Aloofness
~ Hyperactivity
~ Irritability (Common in children with celiac disease)
~ Impatience
~ Lack of Desire to Get Things Done
~ Lack of Feeling
~ Restlessness
~ Timid Behavior
~ Violent Behavior
Neurological Issues

~ Anxiety
~ Apathy
~ Bipolar disorder
~ Depression
~ Difficulty Making Friendships
~ Easy Frustration and Anger
~ Nervousness
~ Panic Attacks
~ Sense of Worthlessness
~ Overly Self-critical
~ Hysteria
~ Hypochondria
Cognitive (Thinking) Symptoms

~ Confused/ Faulty Thinking
~ Confabulation
~ Delusions
~ Dementia
~ Disorientation
~ Faulty Learning
~ Hallucination
~ Inattentiveness
~ Loss of Memory
~ Loss of Immediate Memory
~ Poor Memory
~ Reduced Learning
~ Slow Thinking
~ Scattered Thinking
Suggestion: Print this list out, check off the symptoms that pertain to you… Show your medical provider…
Knowledge is POWER!
YOU know your body!

~ forum … PCOS and Celiac post.. 1st hand experiences, etc…
~ National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA) is a non-profit organization dedicated to raising awareness for celiac disease and gluten intolerance.
~ National Institutes of Health (NIH)… Celiac Disease Awareness Campaign
~ Everyday Health… Gluten Free Help… Community, news…
~ Everyday Health… Gluten Free Blogs
~ Dogtor J … Food intolerance in people and pets … Nice info…

January 31, 2009

IBS – Could it be parasites?

Posted in IBS, PARASITES, SITES n FORUMS tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 6:03 am by PCOSLady


Could “IT” be Parasites?
“I feel squiggly crawly things on me”
It’s real! You could have parasites! You are feeling the damage left at your nerve endings caused by parasites…
~ Doctors tell you “it’s all in your head”…
~ Doctors are WRONG! They have no idea….
Testing Labs
~ Quest Diagnostics – only checks for 3 types…
~ Lab Corp – only checks for 1 type…
~ Parasite Testing Lab – checks for every parasite known…
* Fact: If you are being treated for a symptom over 3 weeks by a doctor and it does not ease up or go away…. 8 of 10 times YOU have parasites!
* FYI: If you travel abroad you should be tested yearly for parasites…
– Get tested yearly in general to be safe…
* FACT: Parasite Testing research doctor asked me, when i called, if i had experienced a burning around my heart… A few days later i experienced 4 bouts of hard indigestion… Now i feel a burn like when you get a razor cut and the skin touches, that kinda burn…
IBS: Irritable Bowl Syndrome
This IBS diagnosis is a “catch all” for many doctors because they have no idea what you actually have!
~ Per the Parasite Testing Lab…
~ 8 of 10 cases are in fact parasites!
* Fact: Parasite Testing Lab years ago tested 100 Europeans, finding 20% had parasites… 100 US were tested and found 32% had parasites… Point: The US doctors claimed the US is to clean to have parasites!
* Fact in Patient Cases:
Gastrointestinal distress — could it be intestinal parasites?
When I started Women to Women over 25 years ago, I saw patients almost every day who were suffering from digestive problems like bloating, constipation, diarrhea, gas and fatigue.
Back then I often referred patients to gastroenterologists. Frequently they came back to me with the diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and with the recommendation that they should make dietary changes, increase fiber in their diet and use Metamucil. But too often these changes brought them no relief. I was aware at that time that stress could play a part in their discomfort, and made suggestions accordingly. But this also did not seem to be very effective. Their symptoms remained mysterious and frustrating.
~ ~ ~
The Cure Zone has great FYI info on parasites…
~ Yahoo Group:
Understanding Parasites
~ ~ ~
Generally parasites mimic many medical conditions… A few are knee pain, arthritis, lower back pain, IBS, etc…
What are the symptoms of internal parasites?
Possible signs and symptoms of internal parasites:

~ Feel tired most of the time (Chronic Fatigue)?
~ Have digestive problems? (gas, bloating, constipation or diarrhea that come and go but never really clear up)
~ Have gastrointestinal symptoms and bulky stools with excess fat in feces?
~ Suffer with food sensitivities and environmental intolerance?
~ Developed allergic-like reactions and can’t understand why?
~ Have joint and muscle pains and inflammation often assumed to be arthritis?
~ Suffer with anemia or iron deficiency (pernicious anemia)?
~ Have hives, rashes, weeping eczema, cutaneous ulcers, swelling, sores, papular lesions, itchy dermatitis?
~ Suffer with restlessness and anxiety?
~ Experience multiple awakenings during the night particularly between 2 and 3 am?
~ Grind your teeth?
~ Have an excessive amount of bacterial or viral infections?
~ Difficulty gaining or losing weight no matter what you do?
~ Did a Candida program which either didn’t help at all or helped somewhat but you still can’t stay away from bread, alcohol, fruit, or fruit juices?
~ Just can’t figure out why you don’t feel really great and neither can your doctor?
~ itchy ears, nose, anus
~ forgetfulness, slow reflexes, gas and bloating, unclear thinking
~ loss of appetite, yellowish face
~ fast heartbeat, heart pain, pain in the navel
~ eating more than normal but still feeling hungry
~ pain in the back, thighs, shoulders
~ lethargy
~ numb hands
~ burning sensation in the stomach
~ drooling while sleeping
~ damp lips at night, dry lips during the day, grinding teeth while asleep
~ bed wetting
~ women: problems with the menstrual cycle
~ men: sexual dysfunction
~ You will find more symptoms…
~ Your genital area will change from normal to a different color i think… Dr Amin had said he can tell by a look!
~ You will find symptoms overlap other conditions…
(* research a diagnosis including almost ALL your symptoms)
~ Your symptoms may show a few days and go away or
show up again or have new symptoms… Realize this is a sign of parasites moving in you!
~ You need checked & treated for parasites before they reach your intestines!
Just read today IBS may also be caused by GMO foods… … Seriously watch the video at
parasite symptoms
ibs gmo
genetic roulette


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