June 13, 2015

CANDIDA (YEAST) SYMPTOMS

Posted in FUNGAL, THE AMERICAN PARASITE, YEAST tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 6:14 pm by PCOSLady

Yeast ~ YOU have it in you! From birth, vaccines, foods, antibiotics, pesticides, hormones, etc...

Yeast ~ YOU have it in you! From birth, vaccines, foods, antibiotics, pesticides, hormones, etc…

CYCLE of YEAST in YOU

PCOS LADY:
~
Amanda of Night Owl Kitchen caught my eye two months ago when she posted What is Candida? Looking at the symptoms I had to add her blog here and the site for everyone… Thank you Amanda!
~
Blog: Night Owl Kitchen
https://nightowlkitchenblog.wordpress.com/
~ Visit her blog and follow her for she makes recipes you may have to try!
~
Site: Candida MD
http://candidamd.com/candida/symptoms.html
~
I’m so happy Dr Humiston mentions all these symptoms are not normal for anyone! The medical world has drilled in us it is normal, we are to accept all of it, etc…
~
The medical world wants us to accept “IT” as normal…
~
I say NO! I want everyone to realize you can get healthy and reverse many symptoms and a lot of damage once you rid and correct the problem(s) in YOU!
~~~
http://candidamd.com/candida/symptoms.html
~
CANDIDA (YEAST) SYMPTOMS
~
By Dr John E. Humiston, MD
Here is a list of symptoms and conditions that commonly occur in people with Candida overgrowth. Most all of these same symptoms typically improve or disappear with effective treatment for Candida.
~
Some of the symptoms listed may sound “normal,” because the Candida problem is so common in the modern world. Some are led to say, when they review this list, “Doesn’t that describe everybody?” It must be emphasized that none of these symptoms are part of normal health. When too many people around us are ill, strange symptoms may become common, but that does not make them normal. Many of the things listed — such as asthma, diabetes, epidemic obesity, chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, ADD/ADHD, autism, panic attacks and others — were virtually non-existent (or at least much less common) before the 1970s. They became much too common as a consequence of various factors, including: widespread overuse of antibiotics starting in the 1950s; increased availability of chlorinated swimming pools; much increased use of pesticides, hormones and antibiotics in the food supply; the advent of the birth control pill; and the addition since the 1990s of barley malt into nearly every baked food (cereals, crackers, cookies) and of high-fructose corn syrup as a sweetener in beverages.

~
A person with Candida overgrowth may have only 2-3 of these symptoms, or may identify with many.
O
MENTAL ~ EMOTIONAL ~ NERVOUS SYSTEM:
~ Headaches and migraine headaches
~ Depression
~ Sleep problems — difficulty falling asleep, or waking up in the middle of the night with a mind that won’t calm down (typically between 1 and 3 am)
~ Irritability and confusion
~ Poor memory
~ Anxiety attacks, panic attacks
~ Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)
~ Heart beating too fast or irregularly
~ Sexual problems — impotence or lack of desire, or excessive sexuality
~ Attention deficit, hyperactivity (ADD/ADHD)
~ Dizziness
~ Numbness
~ Feeling of floating or not quite being in your body
~ Indecisiveness, difficulty organizing and cleaning messy areas
O
DIGESTIVE SYSTEM:
~ Cravings for sugar, chocolate, milk, cheese, vinegar, pickles, alcohol, bread, nuts or fruit
~ “Metabolic syndrome” which includes the following: large abdomen (“beer belly”), adult-onset diabetes, high cholesterol or triglycerides, high blood pressure
~ “Beer belly,” also called truncal obesity — excess weight centered around the abdomen
~ Acid reflux/GERD (heartburn)
~ Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar)
~ Bloating, flatulence or abdominal pain
~ Rectal itching
~ Constipation and/or diarrhea
~ Excessively thin or anorexic/bulimic
O
SKIN ~ EYES ~ HAIR:
~ Skin and nail fungal infections (current or past), including: athlete’s foot, vaginal yeast infections, fungal toenails, ringworm, jock itch, tinea versicolor or itchy eyelids
~ Skin problems like eczema, rashes, psoriasis
~ Prematurely graying hair
~ Pupils always dilated
~ Unusually green eyes, or eye color has turned greenish
O
IMMUNE DISORDERS:
~ Asthma and allergies
~ Recurring infections — colds, ears, bladder, sinus
~ Autoimmune disease (lupus, hypothyroidism, arthritis, others)
~ Penicillin allergy
O
WHOLE BODY:
~ Fatigue
~ Muscle or joint pain, fibromyalgia
~ Cold feet, cold hands, sometimes cold nose
~ Sweating, especially at night
~ Uncomfortable at any temperature
O
WOMEN’s HEALTH ISSUES:
~ Premenstrual syndrome (PMS)
~ Endometriosis (chronic pelvic pain)
~ Infertility (female), some miscarriages, toxemia of pregnancy (preeclampsia)
O
SYMPTOMS SEEN PARTICULARLY IN CHILDREN ~ up to about 8 years old:
~ Early allergy to foods like milk
~ Infections as a baby
~ Child had or has frequent ear infections, tonsillitis, strep throat or bladder infections, especially if these infections were treated with antibiotics
~ Cravings for milk, cheese, yogurt, macaroni and cheese, or peanut butter
~ Asthma
~ “Drama king” or “drama queen” — complains quite vocally and often
~ Poor sleep patterns — difficulty going to sleep, sleeps too lightly or has frequent nightmares, and wakes up too early (or sometimes too late)
~ Too thin or overweight
~ Attention deficit with or without hyperactivity (ADD/ADHD)
~ Aggressive, poor social interactions, can’t stop moving, frequent fights or arguments, frequent crying
~ Autism
~ Pale complexion, dark circles under the eyes
O
Two points should be understood with regard to the above list of signs and symptoms of Candida overgrowth. First, while all of the symptoms listed are definitely seen in Candida patients and evidence indicates Candida causes or strongly contributes to the development of these problems, there are other contributing factors that can also bring about some of these problems (such as mercury or other metal toxicity, consistent excess electromagnetic field exposure, underlying viral infections, petrochemical exposure, etc.). Second, treatment for Candida alone will usually bring about significant improvement in these symptoms, but will not be adequate in all cases to restore health. Often additional treatments aimed at improving liver, adrenal or thyroid function, or correcting immune and allergic problems, are necessary to regain health.

~
BY: The clinical facts and observations concerning Candida overgrowth presented here come from the research and clinical experience of John E. Humiston, M.D., a family practice physician who has worked with over a thousand Candida patients.

July 25, 2014

Sugar Names

Posted in CANCER, DIABETES, LIFESTYLE CHANGES tagged , , , , at 5:21 pm by PCOSLady

PCOS Lady:
Felt you should see this list… It grows and may have a few go to the right side of eating…
~
Please see: https://www.facebook.com/notes/single-mans-kitchen/all-the-249-names-of-sugar-so-far-project/10150839799498198
~
All the 310 names of sugar so far project.
by Single Man’s Kitchen on Friday, May 18, 2012
~
This is the list of the ingredient names for sugars that you find on packages in the USA and Canada. Some of the sugars are really artificial sweeteners, but have a high calorific value, high enough to be considered an artificial sugar.
~
Agave nectar (Often with HFCS)
Agave syrup (Often with HFCS
All natural evaporated cane juice
Amasake
Amber liquid sugar
Anhydrous dextrose
Apple butter (Usually with HFCS)
Apple fructose
Apple sugar
Apple syrup
Arenga sugar
Azucar morena
Bakers special sugar
Barbados Sugar
Barley malt
Barley malt syrup
Bar sugar
Berry Sugar
Beet molasses
Beet sugar
Beet sugar molasses
Beet syrup
Birch syrup
Blackstrap molasses
Blonde coconut sugar
Brown rice syrup
Brown rice malt
Brown sugar
BRS
Buttered syrup
Candy floss
Candy syrup
Candi syrup
Cane crystals
Cane juice
Cane juice crystals
Cane juice powder
Cane sugar
Caramel
Carob syrup
Caster sugar
Castorsugar
Cellobiose
Chicory (HFCS)
Coarse sugar
Coconut crystals
Coconut nectar
Coconut palm sugar
Coconut sap sugar
Coconut sugar
Coconut syrup
Coco sugar
Coco sap sugar
Concentrate juice (Often with HFCS)
Concord grape juice concentrate (Often with HFCS)
Confectioner’s sugar
Corn sugar (HFCS)
Corn syrup (may contain some HFCS)
Corn syrup powder (may contain some HFCS)
Corn syrup solids (may contain some HFCS)
Corn sweetener (HFCS)
Cornsweet 90 ® (really HFCS 90)
Creamed honey (Often with HFCS)
Crystal dextrose
Crystalline fructose
Crystallized organic cane juice
Crystal sugar
D-arabino-hexulose
Dark brown sugar
Dark molasses
Date sap
Date sugar
Decorating sugar
Dehydrated sugar cane juice
Demerara sugar
Demerara light sugar
Dextrin
Dextran
Dextrose
D-fructose
D-fructofuranose
D-glucose
Diastatic malt
Diatase
Disaccharide
Dixie crystals
D-mannose
Dried corn syrup
Dried evaporated organic cane juice
D-xylose
ECJ
Evaporated cane juice
Evaporated organic cane juice
Evaporated corn sweetener (HFCS)
Ethyl maltol
First molasses
Florida Crystals
Free Flowing
Free flowing brown sugar
Fructamyl
Fructosan (may contain HFCS)
Fructose (HFCS)
Fructose crystals (HFCS)
Fructose sweetener (HFCS)
Fruit fructose (HFCS)
Fruit juice (Often with HFCS)
Fruit juice concentrate (Often with HFCS)
Fruit juice nectar (Often with HFCS)
Fruit sugar (Often with HFCS)
Fruit syrup (Often with HFCS)
Galactose
Glucodry
Glucomalt
Glucoplus
Glucose
Glucose-fructose syrup (HFCS)
Glucose solids
Glucose syrup
Glucosweet
Gluctose fructose (HFCS)
Golden molasses
Golden sugar
Golden syrup (GMO beet)
Gomme syrup
Granulated coconut nectar
Granulated coconut sugar
Granulated fructose
Granulated sugar
Granulated sugar cane juice
Granulized cane sugar
Grape sugar
Grape juice concentrate (Often with HFCS)
Gur
HFCS
HFCS 42
HFCS 55
HFCS 90
High dextrose glucose syrup
High-fructose corn syrup (*is the HFCS here)
High fructose maize syrup (HFCS)
High maltose corn syrup (Often with HFCS)
Hydrogenated starch
Hydrogenated starch hydrosylate
Hydrolyzed corn starch (Often with HFCS)
Honey
Honey comb
Honey powder
HSH
Icing sugar
Inulin (HFCS)
Invert sugar
Inverted sugar
Inverted sugar syrup
Invert syrup
Icing sugar
Isoglucose (HFCS)
Isomalt
Isomaltotriose
Isosweet
Jaggery
Jaggery powder
Lactitol
Lactose
Levulose
Lesys
Light brown sugar
Light molasses
Liquid dextrose
Liquid fructose (Often with HFCS)
Liquid fructose syrup (Often with HFCS)
Liquid honey (Often with HFCS)
Liquid maltodextrin
Liquid sucrose
Liquid sugar
Maize sugar
Maize syrup (HFCS)
Maldex
Maldexel
Malt
Malted barley syrup HFCS)
Malted corn syrup (HFCS)
Malted corn and barley syrup (HFCS
Malted barley
Maltitol
Maltitol syrup
Malitsorb
Maltisweet
Maltodextrin
Maltose
Maltotetraitol
Maltotriitol
Maltotriose
Maltotriulose
Malt syrup
Mannitol
Maple Sugar
Maple syrup (Sometimes with HFCS)
Meritose
Meritab 700
Milk sugar
Misri
Mizuame
Molasses
Molasses sugar
Monosaccharide
Morena
Muscovado sugar
Mycose
Mylose
Nigerotriose
Nipa sap
Nipa syrup
Oligosaccharide
Organic Agave
Organic agave syrup
Organic brown rice syrup
Organic cane juice crystals
Organic coconut crystals
Organic coconut nectar
Organic coconut sugar
Organic coconut palm sugar
Organic granulated coconut sugar
Organic maple syrup
Organic palm sugar
Organic rice syrup
Organic sucanat
Organic sugar
Organic raw sugar
Orgeat syrup
Palm sap
Palm sugar
Palm syrup
Panela
Pancake syrup (Often with HFCS)
Panocha
Pearl sugar
Piloncillo
Potato maltodextrine
Potato syrup
Powdered sugar
Promitor
Pure fructose crystals (HFCS)
Pure cane syrup
Pure sugar spun
Raisin syrup
Rapadura
Raw agave syrup
Raw sugar
Raffinose
Refiner’s syrup (Often with HFCS)
Rice bran syrup
Rice malt
Rice maltodextrine
Rice malt syrup
Rice syrup
Rice syrup solids
Raw honey
Rock sugar
Saccharose
Sanding sugar
Second molasses
Shakar
Simple syrup (Often with HFCS)
Sirodex
Soluble corn fiber
Sorbitol
Sorbitol syrup
Sorghum
Sorghum molasses
Sorghum syrup
Sucanat
Sucre de canne naturel
Sucrose
Sucrosweet
Sugar
Sugar beet syrup
Sugar beet crystals
Sugar beet molasses
Sugar cane juice
Sugar cane natural
Sugar glass
Sugar hat
Sugar pine
Sulfured molasses
Sweetened condensed milk (Often with HFCS)
Sweet sorghum syrup
Syrup Syrup
Table sugar
Taffy
Tagatose
Tapioca syrup
Toddy
Treacle
Trehalose
Tremalose
Trimoline
Triose
Trisaccharides
Turbinado sugar
Unrefined sugar
Unsulphured molasses
Wheat syrup
White crystal sugar
White grape juice concentrate (Often with HFCS)
White refined sugar
White sugar
Wood sugar
Xylose
Yacon syrup
Yellow sugar

Copyright 2011, 2012 Jeremy Goodwin.

July 25, 2012

Triglyceride FAQS

Posted in FAQS, LIFESTYLE CHANGES tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 7:36 pm by PCOSLady

Monday, June 25, 2012
~
http://conditions.aolhealth.com/triglycerides/site-map
~
TRIGLYCERIDE ~ FAQs
~
1. What are triglycerides?
~
Triglycerides are a type of fat derived from the food we eat. Any calories we take in that aren’t used right away for energy are converted into triglycerides. Triglycerides move through the blood and are stored in fat cells. Our hormones regulate when triglycerides are released from fat cells to be used as energy between meals.
~
2. Why should I care about my triglyceride level?
~
A high blood triglyceride level–called hypertriglyceridemia–increases your risk for heart disease, heart attack, and stroke. It’s linked to an increased risk for diabetes. High triglycerides are also a risk factor for chronic pancreatitis–inflammation of the pancreas.
~
3. What causes high triglycerides?
~
Excess triglycerides occur most often due to inactivity and being overweight. But they can also be triggered by high alcohol consumption, diabetes, or an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism). Hypertriglyceridemia can also be a side effect of some medications, including birth control, corticosteroids, beta blockers, and others. High triglycerides also can stem from a genetic condition.
~
4. How do I know if I have high triglycerides?
~
A simple blood test, called a fasting lipid profile, measures cholesterol and triglycerides. If you’ve had your cholesterol tested and know your numbers, it’s likely your triglycerides were included. Doctors usually recommend men and women have the test at least every five years, beginning at age 20. People who have high triglycerides or are at risk for heart disease may need to have the test more often. Ask your doctor when you should be tested.
~
5. What does my triglyceride level mean?
~
Everyone has triglycerides in their body. And at normal levels, triglycerides are healthy. Talk to your doctor if your levels are above normal.
~
Below are the ranges for triglyceride levels:
Normal: Less than 150 mg/dL
Borderline-high: 150 to 199 mg/dL
High: 200 to 499 mg/dL
Very high: 500 mg/dL or higher
~
6. What lifestyle changes can I make to lower my triglycerides or keep them under control?
~
If you’re overweight, reduce your calorie intake to achieve a normal weight. Exercise at least 30 minutes each day. Eat a diet low in saturated and trans fats. Drink alcohol only in moderation–one drink a day for women and two for men at most. And try to reduce your carbohydrate intake to no more than 60 percent of total calories. A diet high in carbohydrates raises triglyceride levels.
~
7. Are there medications that can help?
~
Lifestyle changes are the primary treatment for hypertriglyceridemia. But there are medications that may help some people. If your doctor prescribes medicine for high triglyceride levels, it’s still very important to exercise and eat a healthy diet.
~
How Sugar Affects Triglycerides
~
From Every Day Health site – story is deleted
~
Triglycerides Health Center
~
High-Fructose Corn Syrup May Lead to High Triglycerides
~
Open your fridge or cupboard, and take a look at the labels on your food. Chances are you’ll see high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), a common form of added sugar. The U.S. food supply provides a whopping 53 pounds of HFCS per person each year. That adds up to a lot of empty calories. Now a new study from Princeton University suggests that it may also lead to higher triglycerides.
~
Is HFCS Bad News?
~
HFCS is made by processing corn syrup to create a blend of two simple sugars: fructose and glucose. The result is a cheap sweetener used in a wide array of sugary drinks and processed foods, such as regular sodas, energy drinks, sweetened fruit drinks, candies, desserts, canned fruits, jams, yogurt, condiments, soups, spaghetti sauce, crackers, cereals, and breads.
~
In the Princeton study, rats given HFCS gained more weight than those given sucrose (a.k.a. table sugar). This was true even when their calorie intake was the same. Over a period of months, rats fed HFCS also developed higher triglycerides and abnormal increases in abdominal fat. When such changes occur together in humans, they increase the risk for heart disease and type 2 diabetes.
~
The Effect on Triglycerides
~
Scientists are just starting to sort out how HFCS and triglycerides might be linked.
~
Fructose vs. Glucose
~
There has been little research done comparing the effects of HFCS with those of pure fructose or pure glucose. Pure fructose—found naturally in fruit—is broken down and used by the body differently from glucose.
~
Studies show that eating a lot of fructose may raise triglyceride levels after meals. If this eating pattern continues for weeks, it may lead to higher triglyceride levels at other times, too. The triglyceride-raising effect may be stronger in men and in women after menopause than in younger women. Compared to glucose, fructose also may decrease insulin sensitivity and increase belly fat—risk factors for heart disease and diabetes that often go hand-in-hand with elevated triglycerides.
~
HFCS vs. Sucrose
~
In real life, most sugar in the U.S. diet isn’t pure fructose or glucose. Instead, it’s HFCS or sucrose. The latter are both compounds made of fructose and glucose, but there are key differences between them. First, sucrose contains equal parts fructose and glucose. But HFCS contains unequal amounts and often is a bit heavier on the fructose side. Second, the fructose molecules in HFCS, unlike those in sucrose, are “free” and “unbound.” This means they’re easier for the body to use.
~
Theoretically, these differences could account for the different effects seen in rats fed HFCS or sucrose. Researchers think similar effects may occur in people as well. But more research in humans is needed before any firm conclusions can be drawn.
~
Short and Sweet Advice
~
What does this mean for you? To help manage not only your triglycerides but also your weight, it’s best to limit all added sugars. That’s any form of sugar put into a food or drink during processing, cooking, or serving. The American Heart Association says such sugars should add up to no more than 150 calories (about 9 teaspoons) per day for men or 100 calories (about 6 teaspoons) per day for women.
~
Reaching this goal isn’t easy; the average American currently gets more than two to three times that many calories per day from sugar. But every little bit helps. To get started, the next time you’re at the store, instead of buying sugary sodas, energy drinks, or fruit punches, choose sugar-free or low-calorie drinks instead.
~
Keep reading those food labels. If you see HFCS listed there, you might want to give your food or drink choice a second thought.
~
GOOGLE:
triglycerides
how sugar affects triglycerides

June 25, 2012

How Sugar Affects Triglycerides

Posted in LIFESTYLE CHANGES tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 5:51 pm by PCOSLady

PCOS Lady:
Do you have questions on triglycerides? I sure did like how do i lower them, what are they, etc…
~
http://conditions.aolhealth.com/triglycerides/site-map
~
Triglyceride FAQs
~
1. What are triglycerides?
Triglycerides are a type of fat derived from the food we eat. Any calories we take in that aren’t used right away for energy are converted into triglycerides. Triglycerides move through the blood and are stored in fat cells. Our hormones regulate when triglycerides are released from fat cells to be used as energy between meals.
~
2. Why should I care about my triglyceride level?
A high blood triglyceride level–called hypertriglyceridemia–increases your risk for heart disease, heart attack, and stroke. It’s linked to an increased risk for diabetes. High triglycerides are also a risk factor for chronic pancreatitis–inflammation of the pancreas.
~
3. What causes high triglycerides?
Excess triglycerides occur most often due to inactivity and being overweight. But they can also be triggered by high alcohol consumption, diabetes, or an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism). Hypertriglyceridemia can also be a side effect of some medications, including birth control, corticosteroids, beta blockers, and others. High triglycerides also can stem from a genetic condition.
~
4. How do I know if I have high triglycerides?
A simple blood test, called a fasting lipid profile, measures cholesterol and triglycerides. If you’ve had your cholesterol tested and know your numbers, it’s likely your triglycerides were included. Doctors usually recommend men and women have the test at least every five years, beginning at age 20. People who have high triglycerides or are at risk for heart disease may need to have the test more often. Ask your doctor when you should be tested.
~
5. What does my triglyceride level mean?
Everyone has triglycerides in their body. And at normal levels, triglycerides are healthy. Talk to your doctor if your levels are above normal.
~
Below are the ranges for triglyceride levels:
Normal: Less than 150 mg/dL
Borderline-high: 150 to 199 mg/dL
High: 200 to 499 mg/dL
Very high: 500 mg/dL or higher
~
6. What lifestyle changes can I make to lower my triglycerides or keep them under control?
If you’re overweight, reduce your calorie intake to achieve a normal weight. Exercise at least 30 minutes each day. Eat a diet low in saturated and trans fats. Drink alcohol only in moderation–one drink a day for women and two for men at most. And try to reduce your carbohydrate intake to no more than 60 percent of total calories. A diet high in carbohydrates raises triglyceride levels.
~
7. Are there medications that can help?
Lifestyle changes are the primary treatment for hypertriglyceridemia. But there are medications that may help some people. If your doctor prescribes medicine for high triglyceride levels, it’s still very important to exercise and eat a healthy diet.
~
How Sugar Affects Triglycerides
~
From Every Day Health site – story is deleted
Triglycerides Health Center
~
High-Fructose Corn Syrup May Lead to High Triglycerides
~
Open your fridge or cupboard, and take a look at the labels on your food. Chances are you’ll see high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), a common form of added sugar. The U.S. food supply provides a whopping 53 pounds of HFCS per person each year. That adds up to a lot of empty calories. Now a new study from Princeton University suggests that it may also lead to higher triglycerides.
~
Is HFCS Bad News?
~
HFCS is made by processing corn syrup to create a blend of two simple sugars: fructose and glucose. The result is a cheap sweetener used in a wide array of sugary drinks and processed foods, such as regular sodas, energy drinks, sweetened fruit drinks, candies, desserts, canned fruits, jams, yogurt, condiments, soups, spaghetti sauce, crackers, cereals, and breads.
~
In the Princeton study, rats given HFCS gained more weight than those given sucrose (a.k.a. table sugar). This was true even when their calorie intake was the same. Over a period of months, rats fed HFCS also developed higher triglycerides and abnormal increases in abdominal fat. When such changes occur together in humans, they increase the risk for heart disease and type 2 diabetes.
~
The Effect on Triglycerides
~
Scientists are just starting to sort out how HFCS and triglycerides might be linked.
~
Fructose vs. Glucose
~
There has been little research done comparing the effects of HFCS with those of pure fructose or pure glucose. Pure fructose—found naturally in fruit—is broken down and used by the body differently from glucose.
~
Studies show that eating a lot of fructose may raise triglyceride levels after meals. If this eating pattern continues for weeks, it may lead to higher triglyceride levels at other times, too. The triglyceride-raising effect may be stronger in men and in women after menopause than in younger women. Compared to glucose, fructose also may decrease insulin sensitivity and increase belly fat—risk factors for heart disease and diabetes that often go hand-in-hand with elevated triglycerides.
~
HFCS vs. Sucrose
~
In real life, most sugar in the U.S. diet isn’t pure fructose or glucose. Instead, it’s HFCS or sucrose. The latter are both compounds made of fructose and glucose, but there are key differences between them. First, sucrose contains equal parts fructose and glucose. But HFCS contains unequal amounts and often is a bit heavier on the fructose side. Second, the fructose molecules in HFCS, unlike those in sucrose, are “free” and “unbound.” This means they’re easier for the body to use.
~
Theoretically, these differences could account for the different effects seen in rats fed HFCS or sucrose. Researchers think similar effects may occur in people as well. But more research in humans is needed before any firm conclusions can be drawn.
~
Short and Sweet Advice
~
What does this mean for you? To help manage not only your triglycerides but also your weight, it’s best to limit all added sugars. That’s any form of sugar put into a food or drink during processing, cooking, or serving. The American Heart Association says such sugars should add up to no more than 150 calories (about 9 teaspoons) per day for men or 100 calories (about 6 teaspoons) per day for women.
~
Reaching this goal isn’t easy; the average American currently gets more than two to three times that many calories per day from sugar. But every little bit helps.
~
Keep reading those food labels. If you see HFCS listed there, you might want to give your food or drink choice a second thought.

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