August 26, 2013

Brain Eating Parasite

Posted in PARASITES tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 4:53 pm by PCOSLady

BRAIN EATING PARASITE
~
PCOS Lady:
The brain eating parasite i first heard of was seen in Africa like three to four years ago now! Dr Omar Amin owner of the Parasitology Center, www.ParasiteTesting.com in Arizona left the next morning after talking with me by cell phone… He was flying to Africa to study it… He told me the parasite gets in the body going right for the brain and killing them…
~ Dr Amin travels the world researching parasites…
~
That deadly parasite has reached the US!
~
I strongly urge you to get tested by this lab in Arizona!!!!!
~ They test for every “bad” parasite known in the world… www.parasitetesting.com
~
NOTE:
~ Lab Corp, Quest, etc… can only check for 40-50 types…
~ Military labs (2) only check for 200 types…
~ The NJ BioLab rep told me there are no “bad” parasites in the US and you can not get them in your mouth…
~
REALITY
~ “Bad” parasites are in the US! (spoiling food, food with yeast, soil, water, air)
~ “Bad” parasites do reside in your mouth (Morgellons~NCS, mercury poisoning, dental ~ gels, solvents, metal, etc…)
~ 200,000 types of “bad” parasites exist, including yeast!
~ 85 – 90% of the US have “bad” parasites they are unaware of!
~ Only http://www.ParasiteTesting.com lab checks for all known to man in the world!
~ Doctors are not really or extensively trained on parasites especially “bad” parasites!
~ Most all skin disorders are caused by “bad” parasites!
~ Most all medical conditions are caused by “bad”parasites!
* Google: (your symptom) parasite … Then read and learn the truth!

** ALL your symptoms count!!! **
(The symptoms that do not overlap in other medical conditions dictate what you may have)
~ Most all doctors listen to a few symptoms, one strikes them and they diagnose you THAT!
~ SCENARIO:: YOU had a list of more symptoms they never considered! YOU are usually misdiagnosed ~ undiagnosed then prescribed the wrong thing which may make you worse or do nothing while the “beast” in side you advances!
* Note: Most symptoms overlap each other in medical conditions!
BE AWARE AND KEEP A JOURNAL, EVEN CREATE A SPREADSHEET TO PROVE WHAT OVERLAPS SO THE ODD/DIFFERENT SYMPTOMS STAND OUT!
~
http://www.webmd.com/brain/brain-eating-amoeba
~
Brain-Eating Amoeba
~
FACTS
~
* 28 cases reported in the US between 2003 – 2012…
* Almost always fatal…
* Only 2 survivors since 1950…
~
SIGNS and SYMPTOMS ~ Onset symptoms of infection start about five days (range is from one to seven days) after exposure.
~
~ Initial symptoms include, but are not limited to, changes in taste and smell, headache, fever, nausea, vomiting, and stiff neck.
~ Secondary symptoms include confusion, hallucinations, lack of attention, ataxia, and seizures.
~ After the start of symptoms, the disease progresses rapidly over three to seven days, with death occurring from seven to fourteen days after exposure.
~
It doesn’t happen often. But most summers, several Americans — usually healthy, young people — suffer sudden, tragic deaths from brain-eating amoeba.
~
Amoebas are single-celled organisms. The so-called brain-eating amoeba is a species discovered in 1965. It’s formal name is Naegleria fowleri. Although first identified in Australia, this amoeba is believed to have evolved in the U.S.
~
There are several species of Naegleria but only the fowleri species causes human disease. There are several fowleri subtypes. All are believed equally dangerous.
~
PLACES TO FIND THEM!
~
Naegleria loves very warm water. It can survive in water as hot as 113 degrees Fahrenheit.

These amoebas can be found in warm places around the globe. N. fowleri is found in:
~
~ Warm lakes, ponds, and rock pits
~ Mud puddles
~ Warm, slow-flowing rivers, especially those with low water levels
~ Untreated swimming pools and spas
~ Untreated well water or untreated municipal water
~ Hot springs and other geothermal water sources
~ Thermally polluted water, such as runoff from power plants
~ Aquariums
~ Soil, including indoor dust
~
Naegleria can’t live in salt water. It can’t survive in properly treated swimming pools or in properly treated municipal water.

Most cases of N. fowleri disease occur in Southern or Southwestern states. Over half of all infections have been in Florida and Texas.

N. fowleri is microscopic: 8 micrometers to 15 micrometers in size, depending on its life stage and environment. By comparison, a hair is 40 to 50 micrometers wide.
~
SITES
~
Brain-Eating Amoeba (Naegleria Fowleri): Causes and Symptoms
http://www.webmd.com/brain/brain-eating-amoeba
~ http://www.webmd.com/brain/brain-eating-amoeba … WebMD explains what a brain-eating amoeba is …
~
Naegleria fowleri – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naegleria_fowleri
~ en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naegleria_fowleri … Naegleria fowleri / n ə ˈ ɡ l ɪər i ə /, popularly known as the ” brain-eating amoeba”, is a free-living excavate form of protist typically found in warm bodies …
~
Brain-eating parasite kills nearly all its victims – CBS News …
www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=50153682n
~ CBS News video: Brain-eating parasite kills nearly all its victims – An outpouring of support was given to a 12-year-old Florida boy who contracted a …
~
Girl with brain-eating parasite treated with experimental …
www.foxnews.com/…/08/01/girl-with-brain-eating-parasite
~ Fox News … LITTLE ROCK, Ark – A 12-year-old girl from Arkansas who contracted a brain-eating parasite during a trip to a water park has improved slightly after …
~
GOOGLE:
(your symptom) parasite
brain eating parasite symptoms
brain eating parasite from water
brain eating parasite in warm water
brain eating parasite florida
brain eating parasite indiana
brain eating parasite in virginia
brain eating parasite lake
brain eating parasite 2012

May 20, 2013

Heart Attack in Women

Posted in HEART DISEASE, WAKE UP FYI tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 4:28 pm by PCOSLady

www.LEF.org
~ * Extremely well worth joining!
~
* HEART ATTACK SYMPTOMS IN WOMEN *
~
~ Neck, shoulder, upper back or abdominal discomfort
~ Shortness of breath
~ Nausea or vomiting
~ Sweating
~ Light headedness or dizziness
~ Unusual fatigue
~
FACTS: IN WOMEN
2008 ~ Cardiovascular Disease Killed 419,730
2008 ~ Cancer killed 270,210
* 1 in 3 women in the US has some form of cardiovascular disease…
~
Women 35~40 need comprehensive blood tests yearly to identify proven heart attack/stroke risk factors and take corrective actions when any marker is out of range… Per LEF.com & LEF.org
~
Many women wait causing more damage… Not just in the main arteries but also in the smaller arteries that supply blood to the heart… A condition called small vessel heart disease or microvascular disease…
~
PCOS ladies have a high chance of having cardiovascular disease of some type with elevated glucose and triglycerides… Most may have high LDL as well… Your CRP is rarely checked to know if it is high…
~
MAGNESIUM
Having the proper level of magnesium in you reduces Sudden Death!
Coronary Artery Blockage:
*elevated factors*
~ glucose
~ triglycerides
~ c-reactive protein (CRP)
~ LDL
~
Magnesium helps maintain a healthy electrical balance required for normal heart rythm…
~
TESTS:
~
HEART
Cardiac CT ~ 3D scan is 98% accurate
~
SITES
~
http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/164163-overview
~ Medscape
~
GOOGLE:
magnesium
magnesium heart attack
heart attack in women
heart disease
PCOS heart disease
microvascular disease

February 28, 2013

Parasite Test Truth!

Posted in IBS, MORGELLONS~NCS, PARASITES, WAKE UP FYI tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 6:39 pm by PCOSLady

Parasite Test Truth!
~
PCOS Lady:
This woman’s experience is exactly what i am going through! Unnecessary tests from the wrong lab(s), wrong type tests ordered, wasted gas, wasted money to pay for those unnecessary tests, etc… I now have a out of pocket bill for $900 for tests and should have only spent $485 at the Parasitology Center in Arizona and been fully confident in their findings and trusted their treatments!
~ Now i have to prove to my insurance i need the proper testing done at the right lab!
~
All i needed were the proper scripts to the correct lab, www.ParasiteTesting.com in Arizona! After all they literally test for every known parasite to man in the world!
~
Many of you are experiencing “bad” parasites and do not know it…
You may accept them with excuses like:
~ I’m aging
~ My chemistry has changed inside …
~ I ate something wrong …
~ I can’t eat that food anymore… Bad parasites hate acidic foods like pineapple and vinegars!
~ I’m not feeling well, it will pass…
~ I barfed my meal, ok no big deal something did not agree with me…
~ OK, i have diarrhea a few days, it will pass…
~ My doctor says i have IBS, just an upset stomach, etc…
~ My tests came back normal…
~ It’s my time to start getting sick…
~
Yada, yada, yada the EXCUSES KEEP MOUNTING and all the while “YOU” are getting sicker inside… You finally may do something when you start calling out of work, need a doctor, need an operation, you see your looks start getting “ugly”, hair is falling out more, nails are brittle or discoloring just to prove a point here!
~
Ladies, menstrual problems most likely are “bad” parasites! I urge you to be tested before any surgery and expensive treatments, etc…
~ Consider being properly tested if you have had miscarriages as well…
~
I strongly urge you to read through my Parasite and Morgellon posts…
~ Read up on Celiac Disease, Aspartame symptoms too! They can be fatal…
~ After taking antibiotics have you done a yeast cleanse that year? Docs rarely tell you to!
~ The medical world and such do not want you knowing the truths!
~
I copied her piece on lab tests to bring specific attention to the facts that most labs are not equipped to test for “bad” parasites in “YOU“!!!!!
~
Parasites, A Modern Epidemic gives you her journal of getting healthy after bad parasites…
~ She tells of the interesting truths of what we go through to get tested for parasites at almost every lab!
~
http://hsu.com/parasite/modern.epidemic.htm
~
Parasites, A Modern Epidemic
by Garcia Thompson
~ ~ ~
Realize that although you may not feel ill or tired, there may still be parasites within your system. Parasitic infections are masters at hiding while feeding off the human body. So, how can you tell? You can try to take a medical test, but as Dr Andersen (a leading authority on parasitic infections) has said:
~
If you were tested by a doctor for parasites, chances are the results would come back negative. Does this mean you do not have parasites? Unfortunately, medical testing procedures only catch about 20% of the actual cases of parasites. Over a 1,000 species of parasites can live in your body and tests are available for approximately 40 to 50 types. This means, doctors are only testing for about 5% of the parasites and missing 80% of those. This brings the clinically found parasites down to 1%. Now, if I had a 1% chance of winning in the stock market, I don’t think I would invest. Only 1% of parasites are ever clinically found.
~
I went through a medical test that cost me $400, was sent to a “top lab” for the detection of parasites, and still was diagnosed as negative (yet after a few cleanses I have been flushing infections, toxins and parasites from my body daily.) So, although there is a chance the lab test will catch the infection, the likelihood is that it won’t. (the major problem is that the parasites must not only be on the “list” the lab looks for, but also must be laying eggs when the samples are taken.)

~
Dr Ross Andersen:
Quote: “Parasites are one of the most undiagnosed health challenges in the U.S.”
~ A statement based on his 20 years of experience with over 20,000 patients.
http://altered-states.net/barry/newsletter368/index.htm
~
Parasites are the Silent Invasion, what you should know about parasite infestation.
~
According to the World Health Organization, 3.5 billion people suffer from some type of parasitic infection. Not all of these people live in third world countries; many in the developed world have any number of parasitic infections, some of which are so highly contagious that extremely casual contact with something that has been handled by an infected person can infect another person.
~
All people suffer from parasites of one type or another during their lifetimes.
~ EG Bacteria are always at the root of bowel problems, such as pain, bloating and gassiness.
~
The Parasitology Center’s Dr Amin has found H. pylori in most IBS cases… They have a specific test for it…
~
GOOGLE:
Dr Omar Amin
Dr Andersen
Dr Ross Andersen
Dr Andersen parasidic infections
IBS H pylori
EG Bacteria

December 8, 2012

Morgellons (NCS) Symptoms

Posted in MORGELLONS~NCS tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 8:50 pm by PCOSLady

MORGELLONS & NCS SYMPTOMS
~ ~ ~
Morgellons, and Neuro-cutaneous Syndrome (NCS) as characterized by Amin (2001-2009)
~
http://www.parasitetesting.com/morgellons.cfm
~
Parasitology Center, Inc. has been working with Morgellons (hereafter referred to as Neuro-cutaneous Syndrome NCS) for over 15 years which Dr. Amin described from patients experiencing dermatological abnormalities (elevated itchy skin sores that may develop into mucoid lesions) and neurological symptoms (movement, pin prick or crawling sensations) caused by toxic exposures to a wide variety of environmental factors. Those factors include, but are not limited to, incompatible dental materials, toxic fumes in the work place, insecticides or allergenic sprays, household chemicals, implants, recreational drugs, e.g., crystal methamphetamine and/or cocaine, medications, creams, hot sulfur/mineral springs, and any other environmental exposures to which the patient is allergic.
~
SYMPTOMS (in brief)
~
SKIN:
~ open lesions
~ painful sores
~ itchy pimples
~ bumps
~ peeling skin
~ scalp sores
~ fungus
~ etc…
~
NERVOUS:
~ skin irritation
~ pin prick sensations
~ crawling sensations
~ burning sensations
~ movement sensations
~ red hot face
~ memory loss
~ brain fog
~ body tremors
~ vision problems
~ etc…
~
OTHER ORGAN SYSTEMS:
~ endocarditis
~ heart palpitations
~ high blood pressure
~ flu-like symptoms
~ intestinal abnormalities
~ intestinal abnormalities
~ parasites
~ kidney problems
~ respiratory disturbances
~ coughing
~ tight chest
~ swelling
~ joint pain
~ muscular pain
~ liver dysfunction
~ arthritic symptoms
~ etc…
~
ORAL ABNORMALITIES:
~ inflammed gun tissue
~ gray gum tissue
~ mucus secretions
~ dental decay
~ abscesses
~ gray teeth
~ painful roots
~ thrush around lips
~ etc…
~
SENSITIVITY TO:
~ metals
~ aspirin
~ penicillin
~ light
~ noise
~ mold
~ humidity
~ etc…
~
GENERAL:
~ fatigue
~ nausea
~ insomnia
~ compromised immune
~ psychological trauma
~ night fever/sweats
~ weight loss
~ etc…
~
PCOS Lady:
As you can see the symptoms overlap other medical conditions! You have to keep a list and frequency of all your symptoms…
Please realize your dentist could have started this in you at a very young age… Then other pollutants could have made it worse or visa versa…
~
~ Go to the site above, print out the questionnaire, then check off your symptoms…
~ Then fax it or email it to the Parasitology Center in Arizona…
~ Order the proper cultures and tests from them…
~ Get on the path to good health through a trusted lab…
~
SITES
~
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/01/13/mercury-detoxification-protocol.aspx?e_cid=20130113_SNL_Art_1
~ Dr Mercola … Revised Protocol for Detoxifying Your Body from Mercury Exposure … January 13, 2013
~ http://www.holisticdental.org/find_holistic_dentist … Find a holistic dentist …
~
GOOGLE:
morgellons
NCS
fillings ncs
fillings mercury symptoms
burning sensations

November 8, 2012

STRESS or ?

Posted in BACTERIAL, FUNGAL, PARASITES, STRESS tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 10:09 pm by PCOSLady

STRESS or ?
~
Doctors say its STRESS!
~
But:
It could be Stomach Cancer
~ Caused by the H Pyloria Bacteria or parasites!
~
Stomach Cancer Symptoms
~
* It eats you alive from inside!
~ feel full
~ nausea
~ lose weight
* symptoms get worse quick!
~
Doctors tell you its Stress! _____ NO!
~
PCOS Lady:
Symptoms count! I can’t stress it enough! I remind you again your doctor does not know it all nor care to most times! Research your symptoms for your own life’s health! Realize most doctors have no clue about parasites, bacterial or fungal infections, literally! Doctors treat symptoms mainly today, a bandaid to cover up what is growing in you i say!
~
A Dr Oz show, i did not note the day, sorry…
~
IBS ~ irritable bowel syndrome… Most of you have been diagnosed with it! A catch all for doctors because they have no idea what you have! Per Dr Omar Amin in a phone conversation with me a few years ago…
~
Foods that promote the bacteria are salty, fermented, processed and smoked…
~
H Pylori Bacteria
~ Half of the world has it!
~ It causes chronic inflammation in your stomach…
~ It leads to cancer…
* Get tested for it!
~
Braca Gene I & II ~ cancer suppressive genes
~ Breast and cancer genes…
* Get tested for it at some point!
~
Many people have their stomach removed with past family history on it…
~
Vitamin C fights cancer! (flavanoids)
~
Deepak Chopra’s Meditation Cleanse: Detox From Stress in …
http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/deepak-chopra-meditation-cleanse-detox-stress-21-days
~ DoctorOz.com … April 30, 2013 … Deepak Chopra’s Meditation Cleanse: Detox From Stress in 21 Days …
~
SITES
~
H. pylori infection – MayoClinic.com
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/h-pylori/DS00958
~ Mayo Clinic … May 24, 2011 – H. pylori infection occurs when a type of bacteria called Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infects your stomach, usually during childhood. A common cause of peptic ulcers, H. pylori infection is present in about half the people in the world. Most people don’t realize they have H. pylori infection, because they never get sick from it. If you develop signs and symptoms of a peptic ulcer, your doctor will probably test you for H. pylori infection, because it can be treated with antibiotics.
~
H. pylori bacteria linked to blood sugar control in adult type II diabetes
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/03/120314124650.htm
~ Science Daily … Mar 14, 2012 – … A new study by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center reveals that the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) bacteria is associated with elevated levels of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), an important biomarker for blood glucose levels and diabetes. The association was even stronger in obese individuals with a higher Body Mass Index (BMI)…. Worth reading!
~
Stomach Cancer Prevention, Cure, Curing Protocol, Remedies …
curezone.com/dis/1.asp?C0=806
~ Cure Zone … This Stomach Cancer Prevention and/or Curing Protocol is for people who are ready to take the full … You must learn as much as possible about parasites. And …
~
Parasites, Cancer, Genetics …Oh My | dailyRx
www.dailyrx.com/cholangiocarcinoma-genes-found-through-parasite…
~ Daily RX … May 15, 2012 – While parasites in raw fish increase the risk for bile duct cancer in Southeast Asia, it may not be the … Stomach Cancer Genes Identified during parasite research …
~
Hulda Clark’s books
http://www.relfe.com/hulda_clark.html
~ Hulda Clark … In 1993 Dr Hulda Clark, Ph.D. wrote an amazing book “The Cure for all Cancers”. In 1995 she wrote an equally amazing book, “The Cure for all Diseases”. In both books Hulda Clark claims that all diseases are caused by a parasite plus a pollutant. She also claims that it is relatively easily to kill the parasite and remove the pollutant. Her books have case histories which evidence to the truth of her findings.
~
~
Parasites and Cancer – The Budwig Center
www.budwigcenter.com/parasites.php
Learn more about parasites and cancer from the Budwig Center. … As one of the leading causes of cancer is from toxins such as parasites, fungus, bacteria we …
~
Duodenitis – Medical Disability Guidelines
www.mdguidelines.com/duodenitis
~ MD Guidelines … Gastritis; Pyloric ulcer disease · Stomach cancer; Stress disorder … of unknown origin (Crohn’s disease), or infection with a certain intestinal parasite (giardiasis).
~
More evidence to support the theory that GERD is caused by …
http://chriskresser.com/more-evidence-to-support-the-theory-that-gerd-is-caused-by-bacterial-overgrowth
~ Chris Kresser … Apr 2, 2010 – The authors found that 64% of IBS subjects studied also had GERD, whereas 34% of the GERD patients also had IBS. They also found that the prevalence of all functional symptoms (such as nausea, changes in bowel movement, headache, etc.) was higher in overlapping GERD and IBS subjects than the prevalence in GERD subjects without IBS or IBS subjects without GERD.
~
The major stressful life events and cancer: stress history and cancer.
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21461965
~ NCBI … Pub Med.gov … by F Tas – 2012 – Apr 3, 2011 – 80.6%, P = 0.03) had less stress. Patients with gastric cancer had more frequent debt (29.0%, P < 0.001) and lack of livelihood history (21.4%, …~
*
Abstract

The objective of this study was to analyze the extent of stressful life events’ etiology and to compare socio-demographic and medical characteristics of the presence and absence of stress in Turkish cancer patients. Patients with cancer who attended ambulatory patient care units answered the questionnaires. Medical information was reviewed from chart data. The study population comprised 465 women (60.5%) and 303 men (39.5%), in total 768 cases. The median age was 53 years, ranging between 18 and 94. Three-hundred and twenty patients (41.7%) had at least one type of stress since last year of the time of initial diagnosis. Among patients had stress, the median number of stress modalities presented was 1 (range 1-6). Death, lack of livelihood, quarrel, illness, and debt almost always consisted of stress types. History of stress within last year was found more in women (66.3% vs. 56.5%, P = 0.006) and overweight patients (57.5% vs. 47.2%, P = 0.005). Similarly, among cancer types, only patients with breast cancer (41.9% vs. 31.7%, P = 0.04) had lived more stressful situation. However, the married patients (72.2% vs. 80.6%, P = 0.03) had less stress. Patients with gastric cancer had more frequent debt (29.0%, P < 0.001) and lack of livelihood history (21.4%, P = 0.001). Additionally, in lung cancer patients, their rate of livelihood difficulty was highly less than average (2.4%, P = 0.003). We found that overweight patients had more illness history (68.9% vs. 51.6%, P = 0.004), patients who were not working had more death history (89.7% vs. 78%, P = 0.01), and female patients had more quarrel history (78.2% vs. 60.5%, P = 0.002). Likewise, history of debt in patients who is a member of large family (56.2% vs. 27.4%, P = 0.01) was more frequent. Additionally, the lack of livelihood was prominent in urban patients (92.8% vs. 78.6%, P = 0.002) and in patients with low income (48.5% vs. 66.7%, P = 0.004). The question of whether or not psychological factors originated from stressful life events have an influence on cancer initiation and progression is still unanswered after several decades of research. Future studies might benefit from better well-designed articulated hypotheses, prospective design, and large study populations to ensure adequate knowledge.
~
*
Huma Worm – Symptoms List
https://humaworm.com/symptoms.html
~ Huma Worm … Extensive symptoms list!
*
~
BOOKS
~
The Cure for all Cancers ~ by Hulda Clark 1993
The Cure for all Diseases ~ by Hulda Clark 1995
~
GOOGLE:
stomach cancer stress parasite
stomach cancer
H Pyloria Bacteria
intestinal parasites
stress
stress cancer
stress parasites
IBS
irritable bowel syndrome
ibs gerd
gerd
~

STRESS vs EFFECTS IN YOU

STRESS vs EFFECTS IN YOU

October 4, 2012

Toxic Shampoo

Posted in FYI tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 6:58 pm by PCOSLady

PCOS Lady:
I was just made aware of a toxic corrosive chemical put in Dove, Suave, etc… products by a friend… Who now uses Dr Bronner’s things…
~ I have used Suave shampoo for years, it does a nicer job than the expensive shampoos! Hmmm, now i wonder what all the toxins have done in me…
~
* READ the labels! *
~
I posted this article because it relates to estrogen, hormonal levels and more!
~
www.drbronner.com/
~ ~ Dr Bronner … Makers of the best selling Certified Organic and Fair Trade Personal Care…
~
http://www.facebook.com/mariasfarmcountrykitchen
~
http://www.mariasfarmcountrykitchen.com/toxic-shampoo-read-before-applying/?cm_mmc=TheDailyFixNL-_-1063224-_-10042012-_-toxic_shampoo_read_before_applying
~
Toxic Shampoo: Read before Applying
~
October 2, 2012
by guest blogger Isaac Eliaz, MD, MS, LAc, integrative medicine pioneer
~
When embracing a healthy lifestyle, there’s one thing we learn over and over: healthy living requires vigilance. This is true of food and exercise, and, especially, the products we buy.
~
Like so much in modern life, shampoos and hair care products often contain too many ingredients that were born on a chemist’s bench. These chemicals are absorbed through the skin and into the bloodstream, and from there they can wreak havoc on organs, tissues, and cells. Luckily, there are many reputable natural health companies that are aware of these dangers and use healthy cleansing agents in their body products instead.
~
Toxin Alert
~
But, unless you’re extremely careful, it’s pretty much impossible to avoid all exposure to harmful, health-robbing toxins. Here’s a list of common chemical offenders found in many shampoos:
~
~ Parabens: A common preservative used to eliminate bacteria and fungi in cosmetics, parabens have been linked to increased estrogen levels, which can lead to hormonal disorders and even cancer.
~ Quaternium-15: A preservative that releases formaldehyde and has been linked to cancer, specifically leukemia, quaternium-15 is also an allergen and can cause contact dermatitis.
~ Fragrance: We would need an entire book to list all the ingredients found in the various fragrances used in shampoos and skin products. These can cause allergic reactions, rashes, headaches and nausea. Some fragrance compounds have been linked to cancer.
~ Methylisothiazolinone: Often abbreviated on ingredients lists as MIT, this preservative is found in a wide variety of shampoos and has been linked to neurological damage, particularly in unborn children. MIT has also been linked to Alzheimer’s disease.
~ Sodium lauryl sulfate and sodium laureth sulfate: Abbreviated SLS and SLES, these surfactants make soaps foamy. They can also cause skin and eye irritation and have been linked to endocrine disruption, genetic mutations, and cancer.
~ 1,4-dioxane: Not an ingredient so much as a contaminant, however, it’s been found in 22 percent of the products in the Skin Deep Database from the Environmental Working Group. This is cause for concern. The Environmental Protection Agency classifies dioxane as a probable carcinogen.
~
What to Do
~
The first line of defense is prevention. Do whatever you can to keep these chemical compounds off your skin as much as possible. But again, these toxins are so common that it’s difficult to avoid them entirely. Luckily, there are a number of ways to protect your health in the presence of these harmful pollutants.
~
Eat protective nutrients. Many of the harmful chemicals in shampoos and body products have an oxidative effect, which can wreak havoc on cells, tissues, and organs by causing chronic inflammation and free radical damage. Antioxidants combat these effects, particularly vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin A and beta-carotene, alpha lipoic acid, N-acetyl-cysteine, and others. Fresh berries, nuts, cruciferous and colored vegetables, and numerous herbs and spices are also high in antioxidants.
~
Add botanical supplements. Calendula, honeysuckle, astragalus, and rehmannia root can help protect the skin from irritation and other damage. Calendula and honeysuckle are flowers and usually steeped in hot water to make tea. Astragalus and rehmannia are roots and are often ground into a powder and mixed with water, or put into a capsule or tablet form, along with other herbs. Calendula and honeysuckle are also commonly used topically to soothe irritated and inflamed skin. Using herbs both topically and orally can provide greater benefits.
~
Enlist detox helpers. Once harmful chemicals are in your body, you want to do what you can to get them out. A number of dietary supplements, botanicals, foods, and specific cleansing diets can help detoxify many of these pollutants.
~
Seven of the top natural ingredients that offer powerful yet gentle whole-body detoxification are:
~
~ Medicinal mushrooms: Reishi, agaricus, cordyceps, coriolus, maitake, and umbellatus, along with many other types, help to remove toxins from the body. Detoxifying mushrooms can be cooked in meals, taken as supplements, or mixed in powdered form in hot water for tea.
~ Dandelion (leaf and root): Dandelion root provides powerful support for cleansing the liver and the gallbladder—two key organs essential for detoxification. The leaves also help flush toxins from the bladder and digestive tract. Dandelion can be eaten raw or cooked, taken in supplement form, or drunk as a tea.
~ Milk thistle seed: The herb’s seeds contain silymarin, a natural compound that is shown to be a potent liver protector and detoxifier. Milk thistle seeds support gall bladder health, as well, while also providing antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits. Most often, milk thistle seed is taken as a supplement.
~ Garlic: Garlic contains many sulfur compounds and other active components to support detoxification, heavy metal removal, and overall immune health. It can be eaten raw or cooked, or taken in supplement form. Some people juice a small amount and mix it with other vegetable juices.
~ Modified citrus pectin and modified alginates formula: These two ingredients are shown to safely remove heavy metals and toxins from the digestive and circulatory systems, without affecting essential minerals. They are taken as a supplement.
~ Cilantro: A flavorful herb, cilantro binds to and helps remove heavy metals and toxins from the body. It also provides powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits. The leaves and stems can be eaten raw in salads and salsas, juiced raw, or taken as a supplement.
~ Burdock root: This antioxidant, anti-inflammatory herb supports healthy liver detoxification and helps cleanse the circulation of toxins. It can be eaten raw in salads, cooked, or juiced; alternately, you can use it in tea or take it in supplement form.
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Gentle seasonal detoxification is an important practice to adopt. Toxins multiply in our bodies from countless sources, not just shampoo and skin-care products.
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Good information translates into good choices. Pay close attention to ingredient lists, research anything that troubles you, and, from there, you can adopt the best strategies to reduce these harmful effects. Simply “rinse and repeat”—this time using healthy cleansers made from plant-based ingredients.
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Author:
Isaac Eliaz, MD, MS, LAc, integrates Western medicine with his extensive knowledge of traditional Chinese, Tibetan, Ayurvedic, homeopathic, and complementary medical systems. With more than 25 years of clinical experience and research, Dr. Eliaz has a unique holistic approach to the relationship between health and disease, immune enhancement, detoxification, and cancer prevention and treatment. For more information about his work, visit dreliaz.org.
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SITES
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“Inert” Ingredients in Roundup Pesticide Contain Dioxane! | Farm Wars
farmwars.info/?p=5943
Apr 29, 2011 – POEA contaminated with dioxane is more highly toxic than glyphosate. … the inert ingredient of a weedkiller (AKA defoliant) is agent orange.
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GOOGLE:
dioxane
dioxane agent orange
dioxin

October 2, 2012

Vasovagal

Posted in FATIGUE, VASOVAGAL-Fainting tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 6:58 pm by PCOSLady

VASOVAGAL
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VASOVAGAL SYNCOPE – VVS
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PCOS Lady:
Many people are experiencing wanting to faint… That feeling in time is progressing to actually passing out! Many doctors are not looking further than minor diagnosing of fatigue things… Leaving symptoms to progress extremely fast in cases!
~ 2 friends i know have passed out… Both in their early 50’s… One woman passed out at work(she declined any info)… The other a man and his story is posted in a post here… Almost Fatal Crash …. https://pcoslady.wordpress.com/category/fatigue-2/
~ He now is working with a cardiologist that is putting him on a rotating table to measure his results…
~ I watched his symptoms progress extremely fast over 4 months! He and his friend are very lucky to be alive after the crash!
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http://ibs.about.com/gi/o.htm?zi=1/XJ&zTi=1&sdn=ibs&cdn=health&tm=36&f=00&su=p726.8.342.ip_&tt=2&bt=1&bts=1&zu=http%3A//www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/syncope/syncope.htm
~ NINDS: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke …
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What is Syncope?
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Syncope is a medical term used to describe a temporary loss of consciousness due to the sudden decline of blood flow to the brain. Syncope is commonly called fainting or “passing out.” If an individual is about to faint, he or she will feel dizzy, lightheaded, or nauseous and their field of vision may “white out” or “black out.” The skin may be cold and clammy. The person drops to the floor as he or she loses consciousness. After fainting, an individual may be unconscious for a minute or two, but will revive and slowly return to normal. Syncope can occur in otherwise healthy people and affects all age groups, but occurs more often in the elderly.
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There are several types of syncope. Vasovagal syncope usually has an easily identified triggering event such as emotional stress, trauma, pain, the sight of blood, or prolonged standing. Carotid sinus syncope happens because of constriction of the carotid artery in the neck and can occur after turning the head, while shaving, or when wearing a tight collar. Situational syncope happens during urination, defecation, coughing, or as a result of gastrointestinal stimulation. Syncope can also be a symptom of heart disease or abnormalities that create an uneven heart rate or rhythm that temporarily affect blood volume and its distribution in the body. Syncope isn’t normally a primary sign of a neurological disorder, but it may indicate an increased risk for neurologic disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), diabetic neuropathy, and other types of neuropathy. Certain classes of drugs are associated with an increased risk of syncope, including diuretics, calcium antagonists, ACE inhibitors, nitrates, antipsychotics, antihistamines, levodopa, narcotics, and alcohol.
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About.com
~ http://ibs.about.com/od/symptomsofib1/a/IBS-And-The-Vasovagal-Reflex.htm
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VASOVAGAL
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Vasovagal Reflex
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Why do some IBS sufferers have these symptoms? The most likely explanation is the body’s own vasovagal reflex. The reflex stems from our vagus nerve, which is a nerve that travels from our brains to our colons, and contributes to a wide variety of physical functions, including swallowing, speaking, heart rate and digestion.
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The vasovagal reflex is a sudden triggering of the vagus nerve. This may occur in response to a variety of factors, including:
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~ Fear
~ Emotional stress
~ Gastrointestinal illness
~ Pain
~ Sight of blood
~ Standing for a long time
~ Standing up quickly
~ Trauma
~ or another one for you! (everyone is different on thresh holds)
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The reflex results in an abrupt dropping of blood pressure and a sudden reduction in heart rate. At its worst, the reflex will result in fainting, as blood flow shifts away from the head and down into the legs. Fainting that is triggered by the vasovagal reflex is called vasovagal syncope.
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WARNING SIGNS
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At the appearance of warning signs such as;
~ lightheadedness
~ nausea
~ cold and clammy skin
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Counter-pressure maneuvers that involve gripping fingers into a fist, tensing the arms, and crossing the legs or squeezing the thighs together can be used to ward off a fainting spell. If fainting spells occur often without a triggering event, syncope may be a sign of an underlying heart disease.
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YOU may experience the scenario listed below like my male friend does every time now…
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PASSING OUT ~ WARNING SIGNS
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~ nausea
~ profusely sweating
~ lightheadedness
~ weak
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AMBULANCE CALLED … (“KEY” scenario)
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~ real low heart rate
~ real low blood pressure
~ you are deemed A-Fib by EMT people
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HOSPITAL ER … (“KEY” scenario)
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~ heart rate OK
~ blood pressure OK
~ no sign of being A-Fib minutes later!
~ no evidence of a problem…
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NOTE:
This scenario happens with no trail of evidence to track… Even a heart monitor may not pick up on it! Triggers cause the episodes, but may not cause them every time!
~ YOU must keep a journal on your episodes… List the triggers, the feelings, your symptoms, the time of day, how long out, how you felt after, etc… IT all shows your caring cardiologist a pattern…
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SITES
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http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=89547
Vasovagal Syncope
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Medical Author: Benjamin C. Wedro, MD, FAAEM
Medical Editor: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD
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Vasovagal syncope is a common cause of fainting. The vagus nerve is overstimulated and causes the body’s blood vessels to dilate and the heart to slow down. This anti-adrenaline effect decreases the ability of the heart to pump blood upward to the brain against gravity. Without blood flow, the brain turns off. In Victorian England, when this happened because young ladies’ sensibilities were easily offended, this was called a swoon.
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Fortunately, the body is able to correct this temporary problem and return normalcy to the circulatory system in a matter of seconds. Unfortunately, that time delay allows the faint to happen, and while the faint itself is not a big deal, the potential complications may be. Falling is tough as you get older, kids bounce but adults tend to break. Imagine fainting while driving a car or swimming in a lake. While the grizzled veterans of the medical community laugh at the “routine faint” and then welcome the new students into their fraternity, blacking-out is not something to be taken lightly.
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People faint at the sight of blood. Parents faint when their kids get immunized. Older people faint in church. Many types of emotional and physical stressors can stimulate the vagus nerve to do damage. But on occasion, the cause of the faint is not vasovagal syncope but something more serious. Encouraging the person to seek medical care or calling 911 may save a life. While it may be an inconvenience or sometimes an embarrassment to a patient, being unconscious is not normal. It may be easily explained…but it’s not normal.
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GOOGLE:
syncope
vasovagal
vasovagal syncope
vagus nerve
fainting auto accidents
vasovagal research
vasovagal clinical trials

August 21, 2012

DR OMAR AMIN

Posted in DR OMAR AMIN, PARASITES tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 9:06 pm by PCOSLady

PCOS Lady:
I have spoken several times with this man in the past… He has enlightened me to what parasites are about!
I trust him and his lab completely…
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Here are Dr Omar Amin’s credentials for you to compare to the doctor(s) you or your doctor want you to be seen by and treated by…
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The Parasitology Lab will tell you what prescriptions you need to kill the parasites found in you!
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http://www.epu-eg.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=152&Itemid=57

Dr Omar M. Amin…
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Respected: Dr Amin, centre, is a world-renowned researcher of diseases
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Welcome to the Parasitology Center specializing in the diagnosis and management
of parasites in humans by world renown Parasitologist Dr. Omar M. Amin
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Site: http://www.parasitetesting.com/
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Institute of Parasitic Disease Parasitology Center, Inc.
PO Box 28372 903 S. Rural Rd. #101-318
Tempe, AZ 85285 Tempe, AZ 85281
Phone: 480-767-2522
Fax: 480-767-5855
E-mail: omaramin@aol.com
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Most parasites in humans are cosmopolitan. The following are the most common symptoms of parasites in humans:

DIARRHEA, CONSTIPATION, IRRITABLE BOWEL, CRAMPS, GAS, BLOATING, BLEEDING, APPETITE CHANGES, MALABSORPTION, MUCUS, RECTAL ITCHING, GUT LEAKAGE, POOR DIGESTION, FATIGUE, NAUSEA, SKIN RASH, DRY COUGH, BRAIN FOG, LYMPH BLOCKAGE, ALLERGIES, MUSCLE PAIN, JOINT PAIN, MEMORY LOSS, DERMATITIS, HEADACHES, AND INSOMNIA.
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Dr. Omar Amin
Resume of Dr. Omar M. Amin

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Web address: www.parasitetesting.com
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http://www.epu-eg.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=152&Itemid=57

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Education
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Ph. D. Zoology & Parasitology, Arizona State University (ASU), Tempe, 1968.
M. Sc. Medical Entomology, Cairo University, Egypt, 1963.
B. Sc. Agricultural Sciences (Zoology & Botany), Cairo University, 1959.
Other courses of Study
Center for Disease Control (CDC), Atlanta, training courses:
Identification and biology of arthropods of public health importance.
Arthropod borne encephalitis.
Communicable disease control, new techniques and developments.
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Employment and Experience
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1992- : Director, Institute of Parasitic Diseases (IPD) & Parasitology Center, Inc. (PCI), AZ
1971-92: Professor of Parasitology, Allied Health, and Biology, University of Wisconsin, WI.
1969-70: Visiting Fellow, Virology Sect., Center for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA. Research on Rocky Mountain spotted fever/tick vectors.
1967-69: Biology instructor and Post-doctoral Research Assoc. (bio-ecology of ticks) Old Dominion Univ. (ODU), Norfolk, VA.
1966-67: Faculty Assoc. (TA) Zoology and agriculture, ASU, Tempe, AZ.
1960-64: Research Asst., Dept of Medical Zoology, US Naval Medical Research Unit #3 (NAMRU-3), Cairo, with Harry Hoogstraal. Bio-ecology of arthropod disease vectors in Africa; field & lab research.
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Teaching Experience:
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Introductory Courses
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General Zoology and Biology
Bioscience (cellular & physiological orientation)
Organismal Biology (oranismal-syst. & population adapt.)
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Upper division Courses
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Epidemiology (Environmantal Hygiene & Biology program)
Vertebrate Zoology (Biology program)
Seminar & Independent Study (Biology program)
Ecology: Science of Survival (Environmental Science program)
Insects and Disease (modular; University-wide program)
Evolution (modular; University-wide program)
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Parasitology Courses
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Parasitology (Medical Technology & Environmaental Hygiene programs
Human (Clinical) Parasitology (for hospital & medical personnel)
Concepts in Medical Entomology (Biology program)
Field Parasitology (research class, biology program)
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Research interests and experience:
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Nationally and internationally recognized authority in Parasitology, (Protozoology, Helminthology and Arthropod Ectoparasitology) with over 140 Major publications; considerable worldwide field/research and teaching experience.
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Scholarships and Grants:
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Foreign Senior Exchange Scholar (USIS), conduct workshops on Epidemiology & Parasitic Diseases of wildlife/man, Univ. of Bahrain, Persian Gulf, 1989.
Fulbright Scholar, Health Minstry, Bahrain, malaria epid./control, 1986-87.
Sabbatical, University of Wisonsin, 1986-87.
Univ. of Wisconsin grants, 1974, 1988-90, and annual research allocations.
Sea grant College (Wisconsin), US Dept. of Commerce, 1967, 77, 84; Great Lakes parasitology research.
Regional grants from local industry and government agencies almost annually.
University of Wisconsin Alumni Research Fund Grant, 1972.
Sigma-Xi Grant in Aid of Research, 1969, work on RMSF at ODU, Norfolk, VA.
US Army Grant DA-49-193-MD-2439, 1968, for tick studies at ODU.
Arizona State University Tuition scholarships, 1965-67; Foreign Graduate Student Scholarship, 1965-66; Graduate Teaching Asst. Scholarship, 1967.
University Service (University of Wisconsin); not inclusive
Medical Technology Administrative Committee; Executive (Bio.) Committee
Industrial and Environmental Hygiene Administrative Committee;
Chair, Dept. of Biological Sciences; Campus Concerns Comm.; Faculty Senate;
Faculty Rights and Responsibilities Committee; Academic Policies Committee;
Natural Scientific Areas Committee; Animal Welfare and Facilities Committee;
Curriculum committees; International Studies Steering Committeee;
Foreign Student Advisor (among other student organizations’ activities);
Communication Arts Auditorium and Gallery Committee.
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Active Membership in Professional Societies:
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American Society of Parasitologists (and the Rocky Mountain affiliate)
British Society of Parasitology
Entomological Society of America
Helminthological Society of Washington
American Microscopial Society
American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
American Society for Microbiology
Arizona Homeopathic & Integrative Medical Assoc.
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Foreign Languages with reading, writing, and speaking knowledge:
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Arabic and French.
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Foreign Languages with reading knowledge:
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Spanish, German, Russian
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Publications by Dr. Omar M. Amin
1. Amin, O. M. 1966. The fleas (Siphonaptera) of Egypt: Distribution and seasonal dynamics of fleas infesting dogs in the Nile Valley and Delta of Egypt J. Med. Entomol. 3: 293-298.
2. Amin, O. M. 1968. Helminth fauna of Suckers (Castomidae) of the Gila River System, Arizona. Dissert. Abstr. 28: 3521.
3. Amin, O. M. 1968. Deformed individuals of two species of suckers, Catsomus insignus and C. clarki from the Gila River System, Arizona. Copeia 4: 862-863.
4. Amin, O. M. 1969. Helminth fauna of suckers (Castomidae) of the Gila River System, Arizona. I. Nematobothrium texomensis, McIntosh and Self, 1955 (Trematoda) and Glaridarcris confuses Hunter, 1929 (Cestoda) from buffalofish. Am. Midland Nat. 82: 429-443.
5. Amin, O. M. 1969. Helminth fauna of suckers (Castomidae) of the Gila River System, Arizona. II. Five parasites from Castomus spp. Am. Midland Nat. 82: 429-443.
6. Amin, O. M. Amin O. M. 1969. Growth of the dog tick Dermacentor variabilis Say (Acarina: Ixodidae): I. Growth pattern. J. Med. Entomol. 6(3: 305-316.
7. Amin, O. M. 1969 Growth of the dog tick Dermacentor variabilis Say (Acarina: Ixodidae): II. The effect of starvation and host species on its growth and fecundity. J. Med. Entomol. 6: 321-326.
8. Amin, O. M. and D. E. Sonenshine. 1970. Development of the American dog tick Dermacentor variabilis following partial feeding by immatures. Ann. Entomol. Soc. Am. 63: 128-133.
9. Amin, O. M. 1970. The circadian rhythm of dropping of engorged larvae and nymphs of the American dog tick Dermacentor variabilis Say (Acarina: Ixodidae). J. Med. Entomol. 7: 251-255.
10. Amin, O. M. 1973. A preliminary survey of vertebrate ectoparasites in southeastern Wisconsin. J. Med. Entomol. 10: 110-111.
11. Amin, O. M., J. S. Balsano, and K. A. Pfalzgraf. 1973. Lernaea cyprinacea Linn. (Coppepoda: Crustacea) from Root River, Wisconsin fishes. Am. Midland Nat. 89: 484-487.
12. Amin, O. M. and M. H. Madbouly. 1973. Distribution and seasonal dynamics of a tick, a louse fly, and a louse infecting dogs in the Nile Valley and Delta of Egypt. J. Med. Entomol. 10: 118-128.
13. Amin, O. M. 1973. Experimental transmission of Rocky Mountain spotted fever rickettsiae. Ga. Acad. Sci. Bull. 31: 118-128.
14. Amin, O. M. 1974. Intestinal helminthes of the white sucker, Castomus commersoni (Lacepede), in SE Wisconsin. Proc. Helminthol Soc. Wash. 41: 81-88.
15. Amin, O. M. 1974. Comb variations in the rabbit flea, Cediopsylla simplex (Baker). J. Med. Entomol. 11: 227-230.
16. Amin, O. M. and A. G. Hageman. 1974. Mosquitoes and tabanids in southeast Wisconsin. Mosquito News 34: 170-177.
17. Amin, O. M. and W. H. Thompson. 1974. Arboviral antibody survey of wild mammals in southeastern Wisconsin. Trans. Wis. Acad. Sci., Arts, Lett. 602: 303-310.
18. Amin, O. M. 1974. Distribution and ecological observations of wild mammals in southeastern Wisconsin. Trans. Wis. Acad. Sci., Arts, Lett. 62: 311-326.
19. Amin, O. M., T. r. Wells, and H. L. Gately. 1974. Comb variations in the cat flea Ctenocephalides f. felis (bouche). Ann Entomol. Soc. Am.67: 831-834.
20. Amin, O. M. 1975. Intestinal helminthes of some southeastern Wisconsin fishes. Proc. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 42: 43-46.
21. Amin, O. M. 1975. Acanthocephalus parksidei sp. n. (Acanthocephala: Echinorhynchidae) from Wisconsin fishes. J. Parasitol. 61: 301-306.
22. Amin, O. M. 1975. Variability in Acanthocephalus parksidei Amin, 1974 (Acanthocephala: Echinorhynchidae). J. Parasitol. 61: 307-317.
23. Amin, O. M. 1975. Host and seasonal associations of Acanthocephalus parksidei Amin, 1974 (Acanthocephala: Echinorhynchidae) in Wisconsin fishes. J. Parasitol. 61: 318-329.
24. Amin, O. M. 1976. Host associations and seasonal occurrence of fleas from southeastern Wisconsin mammals with observations on morphologic variations. J. Med. Entomol. 13: 179-192.
25. Amin, O. M. 1976. Lice, mites, and ticks of southeastern Wisconsin mammals. Great Lakes Entomol. 9: 195-198.
26. Amin, O. M. and J. M. Burrows. 1977. Host and seasonal associations of Echinorhynchus salmonis (Acanthocephala: Echinorhynchidae) in Lake Michigan fishes. J. Fish. Res. Board Can. 34: 325-331.
27. Amin, O. M. and R. G. Sewell. 1977. Comb variations in the squirrel and chipmunk fleas, Orchopeas h. howardii (Baker) and Megabothris acerbus (Jordan) (Siphonaptera), with notes on the significance of pronotal comb patterns. Am. Midland Nat. 98: 207-212.
28. Amin, O. M. 1977. Helminth parasites of some southeastern Lake Michigan fishes. Proc. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 44: 210-217.
29. Amin, O. M. and J. S. Mackiewicz. 1977. Proreocephalus buplanensis Mayes, 1976 (Cestoda: Proteocephalidae) from Semotilus atromaculatus in Wisconsin. Proc. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 44: 228-229.
30. Amin, O. M. 1977. (Book review). Regulation of parasite populations. G. w. Esch (ed.) Acad. Press, Inc., New York, 1977, 253p. Trans. Am. Fish. Soc. 106: 655-656.
31. Amin, O. M. 1977. Distribution of fish parasites from two southeast Wisconsin streams. Trans. Wis. Acad. Sci., Arts, Lett. 65: 225-230.
32. Amin, O. M. 1978. Intestinal helminthes of some Nile fishes near Cairo, Egypt with redescriptions of Camallanus kirandensis Baylis 1928 (Nematoda) and Bothriocephalus aegyptiacus Rysavy and Moravec 1975. (Cestoda) J. Parasitol. 64: 93-101.
33. Amin, O. M. 1978. Effect of host spawning on Echinorhynchus salmonis Muller, 1784. (Acanthocephala: Echinorhynchidae) maturation and localization. J. Fish Dis. 1: 195-197.
34. Amin, O. M. 1978. Notes on Dina lineata (O. F. Muller) Hirudinea: Erpobdellidae) from the gut of some Nile fishes in Egypt. Proc. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 45: 272-275.
35. Amin, O. M. 1978. On the crustacean hosts of larval acanthocephalan and cestode parasites in southwestern Lake Michigan. J. Parasitol. 64(5): 842-845.
36. Amin, O. M. 1979. Lymphicystis disease in Wisconsin fishes. J. Fish. Dis. 2: 207-217.
37. Amin, O. M., L. A. Burns, and M. J. Redlin. 1980. The ecology of Acanthocephalus parksedei Amin, 1975 (Acanthocephala: Echinorhynchidae) in its isopod intermediate host. Proc. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 74 : 37-46.
38. Amin, O. M. and F. G. Nwokike. 1980. Prevalence of pinworm and whipworm infestations in institutionalized mental patients in Wisconsin, 1966-1976. Wis. Med. J. 79: 31-32.
39. Amin, O. M. and M. J. Redlin. 1980. The effect of host species on growth and variability of Echinorhynchus salmonis Muller, 1784 (Acanthocephala: Echinorhynchidae), with special reference to the status of the genus. Syst. Parasitol. 2: 9-20.
40. Amin, O. M. 1980. Helminth and arthropod parasites of some domestic animals in Wisconsin. Trans. Wis. Acad. Sci., Arts, Lett. 68: 106-110 (Publ. May, 1982).
41. Amin, O. M. 1980. Fessisentis tichiganensis sp. nov. (Acanthocephala: Fessisentidae) from Wisconsin fishes, with a key to species. J. Parasitol. 66: 1039-1045.
42. Amin, O. M. 1981. Leeches (Hirudinea) from Wisconsin, and a description of the spermatophore of Placobdella ornata. Trans. Am. Microsc. Soc. 100: 42-51.
43. Amin, O. M. 1981. On the crustacean ectoparasites of fishes from southeast Wisconsin. Trans. Am. Microsc. Soc. 100: 142-150.
44. Amin, O. M. 1981. The seasonal distribution of Echinorhynchus salmonis (Acanthocephala: Echinorhynchidae) among rainbow smelt, Osmerus mordax Mitchell, in Lake Michigan. J. Fish. Biol. 19: 467-474.
45. Amin, O. M. 1982. Acanthocephala. In Synopsis and classification of living organisms, S. P. Parker, ed. McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York, pp. 467-474.
46. Amin, O. M. and D. G. Meyer. 1982. Paracreptotrematina limi gen. et sp. nov. (Digenea: Allocreadiidae) from the mudminnow, Umbra limi. Proc. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 49: 185-188.
47. Amin, O. M. 1982. Adult trematodes (Digenea) from lake fishes of southeastern Wisconsin, with a key to species of the genus Crepidostomum Braun, 1900 in North America. Proc. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 49: 196-206.
48. Amin, O. M. 1982. Two larval trematodes (Strigeoidea) of fishes in south eastern Wisconsin. Proc. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 49: 207-213.
49. Amin, O. M. 1982. Description of larval Acanthocephalus parksedei Amin, 1975 (Acanthocephala: Echinorhynchidae) from its isopod intermediate host. Proc. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 49: 235-245.
50. Amin, O. M. 1982. The significance of pronotal comb patterns in flea-host lodging adaptations. Wiadomosci Parazytol. 28: 93-94 (in English and Polish, publ. 1983).
51. Amin, O. M. 1983. Labarotory Manual for Organismal Biology, Zoology. Univ. Wis. Parkside Press, 103p.
52. Amin, O. M. and M. E. Wagner. 1983. Further notes on the function of pronotal combs in fleas (Siphonaptera). Ann. Entomol. Soc. Am. 76: 232-234.
53. Amin, O. M. and E. H. Williams, Jr. 1983. Acanthocephalus alabamensis sp. n. (Acanthocephala: Echinorhynchidae) from Alabama fishes. J. Parasitol. 69: 764-768.
54. Amin, O. M. 1984. Camallanid and other nematode parasites of lake fishes in southeastern Wisconsin. Proc. Helminthol, Soc. Was. 51(1): 78-84.
55. Amin, O. M., F. H. Nahhas, F. Al-Yamani, and R. Abu-Hakima. 1984. On three acanthocephalan species from some Arabian Gulf fishes off the coast of Kuwait. J. Parasitol. 70: 168-170.
56. Amin, O. M. 1984. Variability and redescription of Acanthocephalus dirus (Van Cleave, 1931) Van Cleave and Townsend, 1936 (Acanthocephala: Echinorhynchidae) from freshwater fishes in North America. Proc. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 51: 225-237.
57. Amin, O. M. and D. G. Huffman. 1984. Interspecific variability in the genus Acanthocephalus (Acanthocephala: Echinorhynchidae) from North American freshwater fishes, with a key to species. Proc. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 51: 238-240.
58. Amin, O. M. 1985. Hosts and geographical distribution of Acanthocephalus (Acanthocephala: Echinorhynchidae) from North American freshwater fishes, with a discussion of species relationships. Proc. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 51: 210-220.
59. Amin, O. M. 1985. The relationship between the size of some salmonid fishes and the intensity of their acanthocephalan infections. Can. J. Zool. 63: 924-927.
60. Amin, O. M. 1985. Classification. In Biology of the Acanthocephala. D. W. T. Crompton and B. B. Nickol, eds. Cambridge Univ. Press, 27-72.
61. Amin, O. M. 1985. Acanthocephala from lake fishes in Wisconsin: Neoechinorhynchus roberbaueri n. sp. from Erimyzon sucetta (Lacepede), with a key to species of genus Neoechinorhynchus Hamann, 1892 from North American freshwater fishes. J. Parasitol. 71: 312-318.
62. Amin, O. M. 1986. Caryophyllaiedae (Cestoda) from lake fishes in Wisconsin with a description of Isoglaridacris multivitellaria sp. n. from Erimyzon sucetta (Catostomidae). Proc. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 53: 48-58.
63. Amin, O. M. 1986. Acanthocephala from lake fishes in Wisconsin: Host and seasonal distribution of species of the genus Neoechinohynchus Hamann, 1987. J. Parasitol. 72: 111-118.
64. Amin, O. M. and J. C. Vignieri, 1986. Acanthocephala from lake fishes in Wisconsin: Numerical and structural-functional relationships of the giant nuclei in Neoechinorhynchus cylindratus (Neoechinorhynchidae). J. Parasitol. 72: 88-94.
65. Amin, O. M. and J. C. Vignieri, 1986. Acanthocephala from lake fishes in Wisconsin: The giant nuclei pattern in Neoechinorhynchus robertbaueri and N. prolixoides (Neoechinorhynchidae). Proc. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 53: 184-194.
66. Amin, O. M. 1986. Acanthocephala from lake fishes in Wisconsin: Morphometric growth of Neoechinorhynchus cylindratus (Neoechinorhynchidae) and taxonomic implications. Trans. Am. Microsc. Soc. 105: 375-380.
67. Amin, O. M. 1986. On the species and populations of the genus Acanthocephalus from North American freshwater fishes: cladistic analysis. Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash. 94: 574-579.
68. Amin, O. M. 1987. Acanthocephala from lake fishes in Wisconsin: Ecology and host relationships of Pomphorhynchus bulbocolli (Pomphorhynchidae). J. Parasitol. 73 : 278-289.
69. Amin, O. M. 1987. Acanthocephala from lake fishes in Wisconsin: Morphometric growth of Pomphorhynchus bulbocolli (Pomphorhynchidae). J. Parasitol. 73: 806-810.
70. Amin, O. M. 1987. Key to families and subfamilies of Acanthocephala, with the erection of a new class (Polyacanthocephala) and a new order (Polyacanthorhyndiae). J. Parasitol. 73: 1216-1219.
71. Amin, O. M. 1988. Pathogenic micro-organisms and helminthes in sewage products, Arabian Gulf, Country of Bahrain. Am. J. Publ. Hlth. 78: 314-315.
72. Amin, O. M. 1988. Acanthocephala from lake fishes in Wisconsin: on the ecology of Leptorhynchoides thecatus (Rhadinorhynchidae). Proc. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 55: 252-255.
73. Amin, O. M. 1989. Abnormalities in some helminth parasites of fish. Trans. Am. Microsc. Soc. 108: 27-39.
74. Amin, O. M. and D. Larsen. 1989. Acanthocephala from lake fishes in Wisconsin: a biochemical profile of Neoechinorhynchus cylindratus (Neoechinorhynchidae). Trans. Am. Microsc. Soc. 108: 309-315.
75. Amin, O. M. 1989. The status of malaria in Bahrain, Arabian Gulf. J. Univ. Kuwait (Sci.). 16: 135-141.
76. Amin, O. M. 1990. (Book review). Guide to the parasites of fishes of Canada. Part III. Acanthocephala (by H. P. Arai) and Cnidaria (by M. N. Arai). Can. Spec. Publ. Fish. Aqua. Sci. 107, 95 p. J. Parasitol. 76 : 310-311.
77. Amin, O. M. 1990. Cestoda from lake fishes in Wisconsin: The ecology and pathology of Proteocephalus ambloplitis plerocercoids in their fish intermediate hosts. J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 57: 113-119.
78. Amin, O. M. and M. Cowen. 1990. Cestoda from lake fishes in Wisconsin: the ecology and pathology of Proteocephalus ambloplitis and Haplobothrium globuliformis in bass and bowfin. J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 57: 120-131.
79. Amin, O. M. 1990. Cestoda from lake fishes in Wisconsin: Occurrence of Proteocephalus in Esox and other fish species. J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 57: 132-139.
80. Amin, O. M., O. N. Bauer, and E. G. Sidorov. 1991. The description of Paralongicollum nemacheili n. gen., n. sp. (Acanthocephala: Pomphorhynchidae) from freshwater fishes in Kazakh S. S. R. J. Parasitol. 77: 26-31.
81. Amin, O. M. and H. A. Heckmann. 1991. Description of Polymorphus splindlatus n. sp. (Acanthocephala: Polymorphidae) from the heron, Nycticorax nycticorax in Peru. J. Parasitol. 77: 201-205.
82. Amin, O. M. 1991. Helminth parasites from some Tichigan lake fishes in southeast Wisconsin. J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 58: 255-260.
83. Amin, O. M. 1992. Redescription of Hebesoma violentum Van Cleave, 1928 (Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae). J. Parasitol. 78: 30-33.
84. Amin, O. M. and R. A. Heckmann. 1992. Description and pathology of Neoechinorhynchus idahoensis n. sp. (Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae) in Catostomus coumbianus from Idaho. J. Parasitol. 78: 34-39.
85. Amin, O. M. 1992. Cestoda from lake fishes in Wisconsin: The ecology and interspecific relationships of bothriocephalid cestodes in walleye, Stizostedion vitreum J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 59: 76-82.
86. Amin, O. M. and M. Gunset. 1992. The pattern of giant nuclei in Neoechinorhynhus rutili (Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae). Trans. Am. Microsc. Soc. 111: 65-69.
87. Amin, O. M. and M. A. Boraini. 1992. Cestoda from lake fishes in Wisconsin: The morphological identity of Proteocephalus ambloplitis. Trans. Am. Microsc. Soc. 111: 193-198.
88. Amin, O. M., F. H. Whitaker, K. M. Klueber, and J. Hoffpauir. 1993. Ultrastructural changes in the body wall of Neoechinorhynchus cylindratus(Acanthocephala) associated with reproductive activity. Trans. Am. Microsc. Soc. 112: 208-216.
89. Jun, L., L. Shang-Jun. O. M. Amin, and Z. Yumei. 1993. Blood-feeding of the gerbil flea Nosopsyllus laeviceps kuzenkovi (Yagubyants) vector of plague in Inner Mongolia, China. Med. Vet. Entomol. 7: 54-58.
90. Amin, O. M., L. Jun, L. Shangjun, Z. Yumei, and S. Lianzhi. 1993. Development and longevity of Nosopsyllus laeviceps kuzenkovi (Siphonaptera) from Inner Mongolia under laboratory conditions. J. Parasitol. 79: 193-197.
91. Amin, O. M., C. A. Dickey, and A. R. Spallato. 1993. The impact of chemical rehabilitation on the parasitic fauna of fish in a Wisconsin lake. Trans. Wis. Acad. Sci, Arts, Lett. 81:1-5.
92. Amin, O. M. 1992. Review of the genus Polymorphus Luhe, 1911 (Acanthocephala: Polymorphidae), with the synonymization of Hexaglandula Petrochenko, 1950 and Subcorynosoma Hoklova, 1967, and a key to the species. Qatar Univ. Sci. J. 12:115-123 (publ. 1993).
93. Amin, O. M. and F. M. Nahhas. 1994. Acanthocephala of marine fishes, with descriptions of Filisoma longcementglandatus n. sp., Neorhadinorhynchus macrospinosus n. sp. (Cavisomidae), and gravid females of Rhadinorhynchus johnstoni (Rhadinorhynchidae); with keys to species of the genera Filisoma and Neorhadinorhynchus. J. Parasitol. 80: 768-774.
94. Amin, O. M., C. l. Kramer, and S. J. Upton. 1995. Macracanthorhynchus ingens (Acanthocephala: Oligacanthorhynchidae) from a dog, Canis familiaris, In Kansas. Texas J. Sci.
95. Amin, O. M. and B. S. Dezfuli. 1995. Taxonomic notes on Polyacanthorhynchus kenyensis (Acanthocephala: Polyacanthorhynchidae) from Lake Naivasha, Kenya. J. Parasitol. 81: 69-76.
96. Amin, O. M., R. A. Heckmann, R. Mesa, and E. Mesa. 1994. Description and host relationships of cystacanths of Polymorphus spindlatus (Acanthocephala: Polymorphidae) from their paratenic fish hosts in Peru. J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 62: 249-253.
97. Amin, O. M. 1994. Relationships in Parasitology. Explore Part I. 5: 5-8.
98. Amin, O. M. 1995. Relationships in Parasitology. Part II. 6:19-22.
99. Amin, O. M., C. L. Kramer and S. J. Upton. 1995. First report of the acanthocephalan Macracanthocephalus ingens from the domestic dog Canis familiaris in Kansas. Texas J. Sci. 47: 69-72.
100. Amin, O. M. and M. D. Dailey. 1996. Redescription of Dollfusentis heteracanthus (Acanthocephala: Illiosentidae) from bonefish, Albula vulpes, in the West Indies. J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 63: 31-34.
101. Amin, O. M. and O. Sey. 1996. Acanthocephala from Arabian Gulf fishes off Kuwait, with descriptions of Neoechinorhynchus dimorphospinus sp. n. (Neoechinorhynchidae), Tegorhynchus holospinus sp. n. (Illiosentidae), Micraacanthorhynchina kuwaitensis sp. n. (Rhadinorhynchidae), and Slendrorhynchus breviclaviproboscis gen. n., sp. n. (Diplosentidae); and key to species of the genus Micracanthorhynchina. J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 63: 201-210.
102. Amin, O. M., R. A. Heckmann, V. Inchausty and R. Vasquez. 1996. Immature Polyacanthorhynchus rhopalorhynchus (Acanthocephala: Polyacanthorhynchidae) in venton, Hoplias malabaricus (Pisces) from Moca Vie River, Bolivia, with notes on its apical organ and histopathology. J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 63: 115-119.
103. Amin, O. M. and R. M. Pitts. 1996. Moniliformis clarki (Acanthocephala: Moniliformidae) from the pocket gopher, Geomys bursarius missouriensis, in Missouri. J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 63: 144-145.
104. Amin, O. M. and W. L. Minckley. 1996. Parasites of some fish introduced into an Arizona Reservoir, with notes on introductions. J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 63: 193-200.
105. Amin, O. M. 1996. Parasite infections of humans, diagnosis and pathology. A 5-part video tape series. Center Improv. Human Funct., Intern. Wichita, KS.
106. Amin, O. M. 1996. Facial cutaneous dermatitis associated with arthropod presence. Explore 7: 62-64.
107. Amin, O. M. and A. Canaris. 1997. Description of Neolacunisoma geraldschmidti gen. n., sp. n., (Acanthocephala: Centrorhynchidae) from South African Shorebirds. J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 64: 275-280.
108. Amin, O. M. 1997. Prevalence and host relationships of intestinal protozoan infections during the summer of 1996. Explore 8: 29-34.
109. Amin, O. M. and M. Dailey. 1998. Description of Mediorhynchus papillosus (Acanthocephala: Gigantorhynchidae) from a Colorado, USA, population, with a discussion of morphology and geographical variability. J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 65: 189-200.
110. Amin, O. M. and W. L. Bullock. 1998. Neoechinorhynchus rostratum sp. n. (Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae) from the eel, Anguilla rostrata, in estuarine waters of northeastern North America. J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 65: 169-173.
111. Amin, O. M. and K. O. Amin 1998. Herbal Remedies for parasitic infections. Explore 8: 1-59.
112. Amin, O. M. 1998. Marine Flora and Fauna of the Eastern United States: Acanthocephala. NOAA Tech. Rep. NMFS, U. S. Dept. Comm. 28pp.
113. Amin, O. M. 1998. Seasonal prevalence and host relationships of Cyclospora cayetanensis in North America during 1996. Parasitol. Intern. 47: 53-58.
114. Amin, O. M. and L. Margolis. 1998. Redescription of Bolbosoma capitatum (Acanthocephala: Polymorphidae) from false killer whale off Vancouver Island, with taxonomic reconsideration of the species and a synonymy of B. physeteris. J. Helminthol Soc. Wash. 65: 179-188.
115. Amin, O. M., C. Wongsawad, T. Marayong, P. Saehoong, S. Suwattanacoupt and O. Sey. 1998. Spaerechinorhynchus macropisthospinus sp. n. (Acanthocephala: Plagiorhynchidae) from lizards, frogs, and fish in Thailand. J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 65: 174-178.
116. Amin, O. M. 1999. Understanding parasites. Explore 9: 11-13.
117. Amin, O. M. 1999. Detecting microbes. In Optimal Digestion, T. W. Nickols and N. Faass, eds. Avon Books, Inc. N. Y. 145-152.
118. Amin, O. M. and S. S. Hendrix. 1999. Acanthocephala of cichlids (Pisces) in Lake Malawi, Africa, with a description of Acanthogyrus (Acanthosentis) malwawiensis sp. n. (Quadrigyridae) from Labeo cylindricus Peters, 1852 (Cyprindae). J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 66: 47-55.
119. Amin, O. M., A. G. Canaris and M. Kinsella. 1999. A taxonomic reconsideration of the genus Plagiorhynchus s. lat. (Acanthocephala: Plagiorhynchidae), with descriptions of South African Plagiorhynchus (Prosthorhynchus) cylindratus from shore birds and P. (P.). malayensis, and a key to the species of the subgenus Prosthorhynchus. J. Helminthol. Soc. Wash. 66: 123-132.
120. Amin, O. M. 2000. Evaluation of a new system for the fixation, concentration, and staining of intestinal parasites in fecal specimens, with critical observations on the trichrome stain. J. Microbiol. Meth. 39: 127-132.
121. Amin, O. M., W. S. Eidelman, W. Domke, J. Bailey and G. Pfeifer. 2000. An unusual case of anisakiasis in California, U. S. A. Comp. Parasitol. 67: 71-75.
122. Amin, O. M., R. A. Heckmann, N. V. Ha, P. V. Luc and P. N. Doanh. 2000. Revision of the genus Pallisentis (Acanthocephala: Quadrigyridae) with the erection of three new subgenera, the description of Pallisentis (Brevitritospinus) vietnamensis subgen. et. sp. n., a key to species of Pallisentis, and the description of a new quadrigyrid genus, Pararaosentis gen. n. Comp. Parasitol. 67: 40-50
123. Amin, O. M. 2000. Acanthocephala in the Neotropical region. In Matazoan parasites in the neotropics. A systematic and ecological perspective, G. Salgado-Maldonado, A. N. G. Aldrete and V. M. Vidal-Martinez, eds. Inst. Biol., UNAM, Mexico, 167-174.
124. Amin, O. M., R. S. S. Al Sady, F. T. Mhaisen and S. F. Bassat. 2001. Neoechinorhynchus iraqensis sp. n. (Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae) from the freshwater mullet, Liza abu (Heckel), in Iraq. Comp. Parasitol. 68: 108-111.
125. Amin, O. M. 2001. Neuro-cutaneous Syndrome (NCS): a new disorder. Explore 10: 55-56.
126. Amin, O. M. 2001. Neoechinorhynchus didelphis sp. n. (Acanthocephala: Neoechinrohynchidae) from the redfin pickerel, Esox americanus, in Georgia, U. S. A. Comp. Parasitol. 68: 103-107.
127. Amin, O. M. 2002. Seasonal prevalence of intestinal parasites in the United States during 2000. Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. 66: 799-803.
128. Amin, O. M., M. F. A. Saoud and K. S. R. Alkuwari. 2002. Neoechinorhynchus qatarensis sp. n. (Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae) from the blue-barred flame parrot fish, Scarus ghobban Forsskal, 1775, in Qatari waters of the Arabian Gulf. Parasitol. Intern. 51: 171-176.
129. Amin, O. M. 2002. Revision of Neoechinorhynchus Stiles and Hassall, 1905 (Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae) with keys to 88 species in two subgenera. Syst. Parasitol. 53; 1-18.
130. Amin, O. M., S. M. A. Abdullah and F. T. Mhaisen. 2003. Description of Pomphorhynchus spindletruncatus sp. n. (Acanthocephala: Pomphorhynchidae) from freshwater fishes in northern Iraq, with the erection of a new Pomphorhynchid genus, Pyriproboscis gen. n., and keys to genera of Pomphorhynchidae and species of Pomphorhynchus. Syst. Parasitol. 54:229-235.
131. Amin, O. M. and H. Taraschewski. 2003. Description of subadult Pallisentis (Pallisentis) rexus (Acanthocephala: Quadrigyridae) from the vertebrate intermediate host in Thailand with an examination of the species identity. Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash. 116: 215-221 .
132. Amin, O. M. 2003. Evaluation of Trichrome-PLUS stain, a new permanent
stain and procedure for intestinal parasites in fecal specimens. Explore 12: 4-9.
133. Amin, O. M. 2003. Ancient Egyptian medicine. Explore 12: 7-15.
134. Amin, O. M. 2003. On the diagnosis and management of neurocutaneous
syndrome (NCS), a toxicity disorder from dental sealants. Explore 12: 1-5.
135. Amin, O. M., S..M. A. Abdullah and F. T. Mhaisen. 2003. Neoechinorhynchu (Neoechinorhynchus) zabensis sp. n.(Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae) from freshwater fish in northern Iraq. Folia Parasitol. 50: 293-297.
136. Amin, O. M. 2004. Toxicity from dental sealants causing neurocutaneous syndrome (NCS), a dermatological and neurological disorder. J. Holist. Dent. Assoc. 2004: 1-15.
137. Amin, O. M., R. A. Heckmann and N. V. Ha. 2004. On the immature stages of Pallisentis (Pallisentis) celatus (Acanthocephala: Quadrigyridae) from occasional hosts in Vietnam.
138. Amin, O. M., K. Nagasawa and M. J. Grygier. 2004. Seasonal and host distribution of fish acanthocephalans from the Lake Biwa Basin, Japan.
139. Amin, O. M. 2004. Occurrence of the subgenus Acanthosentis Verma & Datta,1929 (Acanthocephala; Quadrigyridae) in Japan, with the description of Acanthogyrus (Acanthosentis) alternatspinus sp. n. and A. (A.) parareceptaclis sp.n. from Lake Biwa drainage fishes and a key species of the subgenus. Syst.Parasitol. 60: 125-137.
140. Amin, O. M. 2004. On the course of neurocutaneous syndrome (NCS) and its pseudo-diagnosis by medical professionals. Explore 13: 4-9.
141. Amin, O. M. 2004. On the diagnosis and management of neurocutaneous syndrome, a toxicity disorder from dental sealants. CA Dent. Assoc. J. 32: 657-663.
142. Amin, O. M., R. A. Heckmann and N. V. Ha. 2004. On the immature stages of Pallisentis (Pallisentis) celatus (Acanthocephala: Quadrigyridae) from occasional Fish hosts in Vietnam. Raffles Bull. Zool. 52: 593-598.
143. Amin, O. M. 2005. Detecting microbes. In Optimal Digestive Health, T. W. Nichols & N. Faass, Eds., Healing Arts Press, Rochester, Vemont. 130-137.
144. Amin, O. M. 2005. Trends in annual, seasonal, geographical and host distribution, and symptomology of Blastocystis hominis infections in the United States. Explore 14: 11-19.
145. Amin, O. M. and K. W. Christison. 2005. Neoechinorhynchus (Neoechinorhynchus) dorsovaginatus n. sp. (Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae) from the dusky kob Agyrosomus japonicus (Sciaenidae) on the southern coast of South Africa. Syst. Parasitol. 61: 173-179.
146. Amin, O. M. 2005. Dental products causing Neuro-cutaneous Syndrome (NCS) symptoms in NCS patients. Explore 14: 57-64.
147. Amin, O. M. 2005. The epidemiology of Blastocystis hominis in the United States. Res. J. Parasitol. 1: 1-11
148. Amin, O. M. 2006. An overview of Neuro-Cutaneous Syndrome (NCS) with a special reference to symptomology. Explore 15: 41-49.
149. Amin, O. M. 2006. On the diagnosis and management of Neurocutaneous Syndrome (NCS), a toxicity desorder from dental sealants.Townsend Letter # 276: 85-90.
150. Amin, O. M. 2006. Prevalence, distribution and host relationships of Cryptosporidium parvum (Protozoa), infections in the United States, 2003-2005. Explore, in press.
151. Amin, O. M., R. Heckmann and M. D. Standing. 2007. The structural-functional relationship of the para-receptacle structure in Acanthocephala. Comp. Parasitol., in press.
152. Heckmann, R., O. M. Amin and M. D. Standing. 2007. Chemical analysis of metals in acanthocephalans utilizing Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDXA) in conjunction with scanning electron microscope (SEM). Comp. Parasitol., in press.
153. Amin, O. M., N. V. Ha and R. Heckmann. 2007. New and already known acanthocephalans from amphibians, reptiles and mammals in Vietnam, with descriptions of two new genera and four new species and keys to species of Pseudoacanthocephalus Petrochenko, 1956 (Echinorhynchidae) and Sphaerechinorhynchus Johnston & Deland, 1929 (Plagiorhynchidae). Syst Parasitol., in press.
154. Amin, O. M., J. Blais, C. V. Oosterhout and J. Cable. 2007. On Acanthogyrus (Acanthosentis) tilapiae (Acanthocephala: Quadrigyridae) from cichlids (Pisces) in Lake Malawi, Africa. Comp. Parasitol., subm.
155. Amin, O. M. 2007. On the the epidemiology of Cryptosporidium parvun (Protozoa) infections in the United States. Res. J. Parasitol., subm.
156. Amin, O. M., N. V. Ha and R. Heckmann. 2007. On five new species of acanthocephala from birds in Vietnam including Pyrirhynchus heterospinus n. gen., n. sp. (Paraheteracnthocephalidae n. fam.) from sand piper, Tringa hypoleucos. Syst. Parasitol., in preparation.

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